Subject Area: Ethnography

Anthropological Perspective on Prostitution the World’s Oldest Profession
 Whelehan, Patricia
2001 0-7734-7604-0 248 pages
This work is essentially an ethnography, written and researched by an anthropologist. As such, the use of participant observation, in-depth interviews and a holistic, relativistic, culture-based approach provide a perspective not usually found in the literature on prostitution. The daily, nonwork lives of prostitutes are explored, showing their commonness, humanity and connections with the ‘straight’ world as ordinary people. By getting deep, rich data through the use of participant observation and ethnographic approach, it serves to address myths, and challenge stereotypes about sexuality, women, and prostitution.

Price: $179.95


Anthropological Study of Raigarh: a Sikh Village in Punjab
 Arora, Daljeet
2008 0-7734-4796-2 308 pages
This work argues for the importance of studying rural India that is witnessing significant economic, political and social changes. Dr. Arora demonstrates for a village in Punjab, a north-west province of India, its complex embedded nature within regional, national and at times international network of relationships.
The author suggests that while Punjab gained considerably with changes in agricultural practices, little attention has been paid on ‘unintended consequences’ of change in relationships of production in the province and the role ‘social actors’ have played in developing adaptation strategies.

Price: $219.95


Band Mobility and Leadership Among the Western Toba Hunter-Gatherers of Gran Chaco in Argentina
 Mendoza, Marcela
2002 0-7734-7080-8 248 pages
Mendoza presents an ethnographic description of the Western Toba, an indigenous population of around 1,200 living in Formosa Province, Argentina. Drawing upon extensive fieldwork, she analyzes the past and present organization of their society, focusing on how it has been affected by changes in the seasonal movements of bands. She argues that despite widespread cultural change among these people, their egalitarian concept of leadership still persists.

Price: $179.95


Gypsy- American: An Ethnogeographic Study
 Nemeth, David J.
2002 0-7734-7217-7 312 pages
This study contributes to scholarship in several innovative ways. It is an ethnogeography, a regional ethnography, that focuses on an ambiguously-defined ethnic group in the United States – Rom Gypsies – whose survival strategies and stratagems appear to center ideally on the secrecy and mobility of its members. Gypsy scholars are continually frustrated in their search for truth because Gypsies, specially in America, remain ill-defined, incommensurable and impossible to map with any accuracy. The near absence of Gypsy-American landscapes and associated culture regions presents a challenge to traditional ethnography. This book contributes an unprecedented scholarly investigation of a Gypsy-American inscape as an alternative approach to the landscape study. The inscape is a vital activity space that produces and reproduces a Gypsy-American ethnos. The study focuses primarily on the activities of Thomas Nicholas, a self-ascribed Rom Gypsy-American, and his family, and offers extraordinary insight into the Gypsy-American ethnos. The book also addresses complex issues in Gypsy studies social science scholarship, provides a critique of its mission and accomplishments, and offers a unique window into the lives of some typical Gypsy scholars whose relentless pursuit of Gypsies involves considerable personal and professional risks.

Price: $219.95


Italians in Rochester, New York 1940-1960
 Salamone, Frank A.
2008 0-7734-5230-3 188 pages
This work examines the experience of Italians as Italian-Americans in Rochester, New York, following World War II. Overall, the work explores the meaning of ethnicity and sheds light on anthropological, sociological, and historical theories of ethnicity and its use to advance the goals of a people. This book contains eight black and white photographs.

Price: $159.95


Ordinal Position and Role Development of the Firstborn American Indian Daughter Within Her Family of Origin
 Silvey, Le Anne E.
2004 0-7734-6400-X 216 pages
This book is based on an exploratory study whose purpose was to explore the variables that influenced and contributed to the role development of firstborn middle-aged American Indian daughters within their families of origin. It is the first research of its kind that explores the role development of the firstborn American Indian daughter within the context of her family of origin that was conducted by, for, and on behalf of, American Indian women. While there is a dearth of literature written about American Indian women, what has been written has been by Anglo men, based on studies of men, and whose findings are generally superimposed on women. This research is groundbreaking in that it gives voice to the middle-aged firstborn American Indian daughters studied within the context of ecological theory and in combination with self-in-relation and feminist theoretical perspectives.

This ethnographic study illuminates the everyday lives of the firstborn daughters whose role development was shaped and influenced by the experiences of their parents and grandparents, steeped in forced assimilation by U.S. government policies, who were removed from their own parents and sent to boarding schools. These ethnographic presentations of the women’s lives and families are moving the study of American Indians in new directions of viewing cultural history from an intimate feminist point of view. This book contributes to the historic writings of the American Indian cultural experience in America, as well as provides a new foundational insight into the role development of firstborn American Indian daughters within the context of their families, for deeper understanding by scholars and practice interventions for helping professionals across disciplines.

Price: $179.95