Subject Area: History-British

Anglo-Saxon Propaganda in the Bayeux Tapestry
 Clermont-Ferrand, Meredith
2004 0-7734-6385-2 208 pages
This study details the secret, subversive and sustaining Anglo-Saxon messages encoded in a work of art that purportedly celebrates the Norman French conquest of England. This is a pioneering perspective that no other scholar has brought to the Tapestry.

Price: $179.95


Changes in Educational Policies in Britain, 1800-1920: How Gender Inequalities Reshaped the Teaching Profession
 Corr, Helen
2009 0-7734-4913-2 304 pages
Historically, education in Scotland lies at the heart of national pride and has been widely acclaimed as a more democratic and meritocratic system in terms of wider access to schools and universities when compared with England. One of the main paradoxes which this book unpacks is the that under the Scottish public co-education structure, schoolmasters did overall benefit more favorably within this distinctive tradition whereas the treatment of women teachers as an occupational group in relative terms was more ideologically undemocratic and patriarchal in relation to their female counterparts under the English system. This book sets out on a historical journey and embarks on the reconstruction of policy formation on gender and occupational segregation in the elementary (now called primary) school teaching and it shows that there was nothing ‘natural’ about that process.

Price: $219.95


Diaries and Letters of Robert Bernays, 1932-1939. An Insider's Account of the House of Commons
 Bernays, Robert
1996 0-7734-8864-2 450 pages
Bernays was elected to the House of Commons in 1931, at the age of 29. This archive material consists of weekly letters and diary entries. These provide unvarnished portraits of the 'big guns' of the government and social milieu: Ramsey MacDonald (whom he called a 'nincompoop'), Baldwin, Anthony Eden, Hoare, Churchill, Chamberlain. He covers the Abdication crisis in full, and strain of the coming war and Chamberlain's policy of appeasing Hitler. Just about every leading personality and issue of the day is discussed. The personal side is also included. His social life included frequent visits at Lady Astor's Cliveden, and he knew Bernard Shaw, Sidney and Beatrice Webb, Noel Coward, Diana Cooper, Lord Halifax, etc. He was a frequent guest of the society hostesses Sybil Colefax, Lady Londonderry, and Lady Cunard. There is an 'I am a camera' feel to the material. His abilities as witness and observer give the material its edge and make it an invaluable source of information for scholars and political historians.

Price: $259.95


Diary of George Bubb Dodington, Baron of Melcombe Regis ( 1691 - 1762 )
 Rogal, Samuel J.
2016 1-4955-0480-8 425 pages
This work presents a sharply focused view into aspects of the eighteenth-century English political scene rarely studied. Two clear perspectives of Dodington emerge. First there is the relentless political job-seeker offering his services in exchange for building his own political base. Second, there is the experienced and knowledgeable politician who is capable of dispensing practical and useful advice on matters foreign and domestic.


Price: $259.95


George III. National Reform, and North America
 Bullion, John J.
2012 0-7734-4079-8 584 pages
The book is a collection of Professor John L. Bullion’s published and unpublished essays on King George III’s impact on the origins and development of the American Revolution. They comprise the most extensive investigation and assessment of George’s relationship to his mother, the Dowager Princess of Wales Augusta, and her enduring influence upon his character and approach to politics. The essays also examine in detail his friendship with the Earl of Bute, both as a young protégé with his mentor and as a king with his minister. They are the most complete and compelling account of George’s early years in his preparation for “the true essential business of a king.” They establish how his development and studies contributed to the imperial crisis and the loss of most of Britain’s North American empire. In addition, Bullion’s careful examination of policy dilemmas reveal the difficulties Britain’s leaders faced. Bute’s central role in the making of peace with the French and Spanish and in planning for Britain’s security, finances, and commerce during the postwar period are covered extensively. These essays fully show how and why the disastrous decisions on colonial policies in the early 1760’s were made. Other chapters shed new light on the king’s reactions to the armed struggle in America during 1775-1783 and the aftermath of defeat. The book closes with a poignant and hitherto unpublished account of the old monarch’s turn away from reform. By illustrating so vividly the mistakes and tragedies of his reign, this book will significantly alter historians’ understanding of George III, his family, his “dearest friend” Bute, and the politicians who acted with America’s last king.

Price: $319.95


Globe Theatre Project
 Conkie, Rob
2006 0-7734-5724-0 296 pages
Analyzes performances at the reconstructed Globe Theatre in London between 1996 and 2004 through a focus on the new Globe’s most defining characteristic: authenticity. In that this concept of authenticity reverberates so urgently with debates about identity – from national to personal, heritage-centered to technologically-mediated – the book addresses both the question of why authenticity has become so crucial in late twentieth and early twenty-first century Britain and it further considers what productions of the ‘authentic Shakespeare’ at the new Globe have to say about contemporary identities.

Price: $199.95


LEARNING AND CULTURE IN LATE ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND AND THE INFLUENCE OF RAMSEY ABBEY ON THE MAJOR ENGLISH MONASTIC SCHOOLS Vol. 1
 Hart, Cyril
2002 0-7734-6886-2 692 pages
This massive 3-volume work describes the origin, flowering and decline of one particular monastic school during the fifty years which followed the reception into England of the Benedictine reformation which had swept Northern Europe during the middle years of the tenth century. Ramsey was endowed and established in 964, with a magnificent library, school and scriptorium. It was backed by powerful patrons, and Byrhtferth, its schoolmaster, was entrusted to cultivate in England the new learning that had become the driving force of the Continental reform. Starting with Bede’s historical and scientific works, he resuscitated the national vernacular chronicles and assembled for the first time materials for both regional and national chronicles in Latin. He also produced a number of saints’ lives. Abbo of Fleury, the most renowned Continental scholar of his day, visited Ramsey from 985 to 987, bringing with him many computistical and scientific tracts and teaching in its school. Ramsey was also at the forefront of an artistic revival, introducing important new features into book illumination. This radical and intensive study of the School of Ramsey brings all this together for the first time, shedding fresh light on the intellectual climate in late Anglo-Saxon England, with special attention to its indebtedness to Continental scholarship. The first volume is concerned mainly with the new curriculum in monastic schools and Byrhtferth’s important historical works. The second volume (divided into two books) includes a wide-ranging survey of the development of mathematical, medical and scientific studies in England before the Norman Conquest. Many basic texts are edited and translated in a series of appendices, and illustrated by 100 line drawings. Each volume has its own introduction and extensive bibliography and is fully indexed.

Price: $359.95


LEARNING AND CULTURE IN LATE ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND AND THE INFLUENCE OF RAMSEY ABBEY ON THE MAJOR ENGLISH MONASTIC SCHOOLS Vol. 2, Book 1
 Hart, Cyril
2002 0-7734-6888-9 376 pages
This massive 3-volume work describes the origin, flowering and decline of one particular monastic school during the fifty years which followed the reception into England of the Benedictine reformation which had swept Northern Europe during the middle years of the tenth century. Ramsey was endowed and established in 964, with a magnificent library, school and scriptorium. It was backed by powerful patrons, and Byrhtferth, its schoolmaster, was entrusted to cultivate in England the new learning that had become the driving force of the Continental reform. Starting with Bede’s historical and scientific works, he resuscitated the national vernacular chronicles and assembled for the first time materials for both regional and national chronicles in Latin. He also produced a number of saints’ lives. Abbo of Fleury, the most renowned Continental scholar of his day, visited Ramsey from 985 to 987, bringing with him many computistical and scientific tracts and teaching in its school. Ramsey was also at the forefront of an artistic revival, introducing important new features into book illumination. This radical and intensive study of the School of Ramsey brings all this together for the first time, shedding fresh light on the intellectual climate in late Anglo-Saxon England, with special attention to its indebtedness to Continental scholarship. The first volume is concerned mainly with the new curriculum in monastic schools and Byrhtferth’s important historical works. The second volume (divided into two books) includes a wide-ranging survey of the development of mathematical, medical and scientific studies in England before the Norman Conquest. Many basic texts are edited and translated in a series of appendices, and illustrated by 100 line drawings. Each volume has its own introduction and extensive bibliography and is fully indexed.

Price: $239.95


LEARNING AND CULTURE IN LATE ANGLO-SAXON ENGLAND AND THE INFLUENCE OF RAMSEY ABBEY ON THE MAJOR ENGLISH MONASTIC SCHOOLS Vol. 2, Book 2
 Hart, Cyril
2002 0-7734-6890-0 320 pages
This massive 3-volume work describes the origin, flowering and decline of one particular monastic school during the fifty years which followed the reception into England of the Benedictine reformation which had swept Northern Europe during the middle years of the tenth century. Ramsey was endowed and established in 964, with a magnificent library, school and scriptorium. It was backed by powerful patrons, and Byrhtferth, its schoolmaster, was entrusted to cultivate in England the new learning that had become the driving force of the Continental reform. Starting with Bede’s historical and scientific works, he resuscitated the national vernacular chronicles and assembled for the first time materials for both regional and national chronicles in Latin. He also produced a number of saints’ lives. Abbo of Fleury, the most renowned Continental scholar of his day, visited Ramsey from 985 to 987, bringing with him many computistical and scientific tracts and teaching in its school. Ramsey was also at the forefront of an artistic revival, introducing important new features into book illumination. This radical and intensive study of the School of Ramsey brings all this together for the first time, shedding fresh light on the intellectual climate in late Anglo-Saxon England, with special attention to its indebtedness to Continental scholarship. The first volume is concerned mainly with the new curriculum in monastic schools and Byrhtferth’s important historical works. The second volume (divided into two books) includes a wide-ranging survey of the development of mathematical, medical and scientific studies in England before the Norman Conquest. Many basic texts are edited and translated in a series of appendices, and illustrated by 100 line drawings. Each volume has its own introduction and extensive bibliography and is fully indexed.

Price: $219.95


Male Pretense: A Gender Study of Sir Philip Sidney's Life and Texts
 Bachinger, Katrina
1995 0-7734-1270-0 164 pages
The life and works of Sir Philip Sidney, the highly innovative Elizabethan author and statesman, become remarkably relevant to us today when they are viewed, as they are in this book, as explorations of the pleomorphism of gender. Sidney's revealing correspondence with his tutor Hubert Languet displays a friendship that seems to have developed into a homoerotic attachment or Greek love and thereby problematized Sidney's own gender. That personal gender problematic explains, as this book demonstrates, why Sidney's early masque The Lady of May can be read simultaneously as a textualisation of the instability of gender difference and of Sidney's relationship to his Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I. After tracing the same themes through Sidney's Old Arcadia, it focuses on his sonnet sequence Astrophil and Stella. There it returns to his problematic homoerotic attachment to Languet, finding in it a new answer to the age-old riddle of those famous love poems.

Price: $159.95


Riot and Resistance in County Norfolk, 1646-1650
 Hendrix, Scott E.
2012 0-7734-3915-3 176 pages
This text offers new insight into the political unrest in East Britain between 1646 and 1650. New information is provided regarding the “Winter Insurrection” of 1650. New analysis connects these events to future uprisings in Britain and the United States.

Price: $159.95


Shakespeare and Public Execution
 Mitchell, Charles
2004 0-7734-6553-7 172 pages
Demonstrates how Shakespeare utilized a strategy of manipulating the language and conventions of public execution in his plays. Paying special attention to the poetics of hangings at Tyburn, the most dominant place of execution, Shakespeare’s subversion of this well-known (and uneasy) discourse between the public and the state is illuminated by close readings of The Comedy of Errors, Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. It uses audience-reception theory and new historicism, as well as non-dramatic texts (popular literature and ballads) to demonstrate the knowledge and experiences of execution that the audiences of Shakespeare’s time took with them to the theatre. With illustrations.

Price: $159.95


Shakespeare and Public Execution - NYRB Softcover price
 Mitchell, Charles
2004 1-4955-0928-1 172 pages
Demonstrates how Shakespeare utilized a strategy of manipulating the language and conventions of public execution in his plays. Paying special attention to the poetics of hangings at Tyburn, the most dominant place of execution, Shakespeare’s subversion of this well-known (and uneasy) discourse between the public and the state is illuminated by close readings of The Comedy of Errors, Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. It uses audience-reception theory and new historicism, as well as non-dramatic texts (popular literature and ballads) to demonstrate the knowledge and experiences of execution that the audiences of Shakespeare’s time took with them to the theatre. With illustrations.

Price: $29.95


The Harford Family (1372-1900) by Alice Harford: A New Edition with Scholarly Annotations and an Introduction by Samuel J. Rogal
 Rogal, Samuel J.
2022 1-4955-0996-6 352 pages
"To write the history of a large family whose various roots and branches extend over more than six centuries emerges, in this mind's eye, as an Herculean task that few persons would dare to consider and a lesser number to undertake, even with the technological advantages bestowed on twenty-first-century research. Consider, then, the disadvantages thrust upon the researcher of the late nineteenth or early twentieth centuries, even if he or she lay claim to membership of that family: nothing resembling the computer or internet; limited telephone service; travel by train to cities and towns; by horse-drawn vehicles to isolated provincial villages; poring over published narratives and descriptions that might have or have not been accurate; searching parish records; hours bent over and down to read and note the aged etchings upon gravestones and church memorial plaques; conversations with persons whose memories and recollections might not always had been clear or had been clouded by time; sifting the anecdotal from the factual; placing hundreds of names upon scores of genealogical charts and tables; transferring hundreds of handwritten notes to typewritten pages. Alice Harford must have done all or most of the above to produce, in 1909, her Annals of the Harford Family." -From the Editor's Introduction

Price: $239.95


Thorney Annals 963-1412 A. D. An Edition and Translation
 Hart, Cyril
1997 0-7734-8535-X 80 pages
Thorney Abbey lies in the Cambridgeshire Fenlands. It was founded in 971 and survived until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1540, and ranked as one of the most important religious houses in the Eastern fenlands. The early annals are all in a hand datable to 1110, and were therefore entered retrospectively, but for the next three centuries the annals appear to have been added contemporaneously year by year. In this first complete edition, Latin text and English translation on opposing pages, and a full introduction, critical notes and indexes are provided. Individual annals recorded events of both local and national importance. Besides the succession of abbots and bishops, they covered such topics as the price of wheat, floods, fires, epidemics, and royal successions. Occasional entries cover a range of unexpected subjects sch as the sinking of the White Ship, the beheading of Piers Gaveston, the suppression of the Templars, the writings and trial of John Wycliffe, and the Black Death.

Price: $79.95


Unemployment and Employment Policies Concerning Women in Britain 1900-1951
 Laybourn, Keith
2002 0-7734-7085-9 262 pages
This study addresses the three major aspects of Britain's discriminatory approach to women's employment laws which were domestic service, broad unemployment and the links between voluntary bodies and the British state

Price: $199.95


Victorian Ambivalence About Queen Elizabeth I: The Political History of a Royal Reputation
 Potter, Jr., Clifton W.
2010 0-7734-3722-3 380 pages
This work examines the gender politics of Victorian Britain through an analysis of nineteenth-century representations of Queen Elizabeth I. The book includes a study of how women regarded powerful females.

Price: $239.95


Was Shakespeare a Jew? Uncovering the Marrano Influences in His Life and Writing
 Muller, Ghislain
2011 0-7734-3939-0 376 pages
This biography of Shakespeare presents a new perspective on the debate surrounding the real identity of William Shakespeare. Muller suggests that Shakespeare took care to hide his Jewish origins and that Elizabethan authorities, who were aware of this fact, attempted to eliminate any trace of his Jewish origins by making him an Anglo-Saxon hero. Using official documents that have not been employed by other scholars, Muller brings forth evidence that Shakespeare’s father was a Jew living in an England where Jews had been banned since the time of Edward I and the Act of Expulsion in 1290. Muller demonstrates that Shakespeare was brought up in the Jewish faith and that many of his closest connections were from Jewish circles. In addition, Shakespeare’s coat of arms, his retirement to Stratford, and his last will and testament, are further used as evidence that Shakespeare was a Jew. Anyone interested in the works of William Shakespeare, his life, and his true identity, will enjoy this well-researched and written book.

Price: $239.95