Subject Area: Italy & Italian Studies

Alexandreida in Rima: The Life and Deeds of Alexander the Great in an Anonymous Italian Renaissance Poem
2004 0-7734-6446-8
This work is a critical edition of an Italian poetic version of the legend of Alexander the Great. The Alexandreida in rima was written in the 15th century, and was primarily derived from a 12th century Latin prose version of a Greek romance. Although a versifier of limited abilities, the anonymous Italian compiler perceived that he had, literally, a fabulous tale to tell, and he worked diligently to transform it into ottava rima, the popular poetic form of the time. His poem brought to the Italian public one of the richest legends of all time, and it met with such success that it was reprinted 16 times between the 16th and 18th centuries. This work will make accessible to scholars a popular epic whose hero was honored as one of the Nine Worthies of the early modern period.

American Constitution as a Symbol and Reality for Italy
1989 0-88946-095-7
Thematically organized around the American Constitution, this collection of essays focuses on: (1) Italian influences on American thinkers during the Revolutionary years; and (2) Italian reactions to the Constitution and its republican order.

Annotated and Illustrated Version of Giorgio Vasari’s History of Italian and Northern Prints From His Lives of the Artists (1550 and 1568) Volume One
2002 0-7734-7187-1
Giorgio Vasari, friend of Michelangelo and the first art historian, in the second edition of his Lives of the Artists, mentioned almost 500 different prints from the 15th and 16th centuries, from both Italy and the North. Even with a number of editions of Vasari’s Lives now in print, this section of his text on prints is not readily available, and it has never been annotated. This volume identifies his numerous references and discusses the implications of his choices. The illustrations show works not found in the standard illustrated compendiums, such as Bartsch and Hollstein. Others depict works that Vasari recommended but that have slipped from our modern conventions of what ideas a print should convey, and how it should convey them. There are 194 illustrations. Two Volume set: Volume 1: Text 0-7734-7187-1 342pp. 2002 Volume 2: Reproductions 0-7734-7005-0 400pp. 2002 This is an oversize (8 1/2x 11) set. Due to the size and the large number of illustrations, each volume is priced at $189.95/£109.95

Annotated and Illustrated Version of Giorgio Vasari’s History of Italian and Northern Prints From His Lives of the Artists (1550 and 1568) Volume Two
2002 0-7734-7005-0
Giorgio Vasari, friend of Michelangelo and the first art historian, in the second edition of his Lives of the Artists, mentioned almost 500 different prints from the 15th and 16th centuries, from both Italy and the North. Even with a number of editions of Vasari’s Lives now in print, this section of his text on prints is not readily available, and it has never been annotated. This volume identifies his numerous references and discusses the implications of his choices. The illustrations show works not found in the standard illustrated compendiums, such as Bartsch and Hollstein. Others depict works that Vasari recommended but that have slipped from our modern conventions of what ideas a print should convey, and how it should convey them. There are 194 illustrations. Two Volume set: Volume 1: Text 0-7734-7187-1 342pp. 2002 Volume 2: Reproductions 0-7734-7005-0 400pp. 2002 This is an oversize (8 1/2x 11) set. Due to the size and the large number of illustrations, each volume is priced at $189.95/£109.95

Anthology of Renaissance Plays in Translation
2002 0-7734-6905-2
A selection of Renaissance Italian, Spanish and Portuguese plays in translation, each accompanied by an introduction to the author and his works and their cultural milieu.

Ariosto's the Supposes, Machiavelli's the Mandrake, Intronati's the Deceived Three Italian Renaissance Comedies
1996 0-7734-8821-9
This volume offers newly-translated texts of three established classics of Italian Renaissance comedy, with scholarly introductions and bibliographies for each: Ariosto's seminal second play, The Supposes; Machiavelli's Mandrake; and the composition of the Sienese Intronati, The Deceived. The works are linked by documentable bond of influence, and also represent a solid chapter in the history of theatrical staging, since there are traces of evidence of idealised cityscape perspective sets for early performances of both The Supposes and The Deceived. These plays embody distinctive traditions and contributions to the genesis of European comedy.

Aspiration Toward a Lost Natural Harmony in the Work of Three Italian Writers Leopardi, Verga, and Moravia
1990 0-7734-9706-4
Traces, in the works of three Italian writes belonging to different periods and backgrounds, a common aspiration to a lost harmony. This perennial aspiration has found expression in many forms. It is the vital nature of this quest, one often deemed by them to be hopeless, that gives the work of these writers its dynamism and sometimes tragic tension.

Carlo Goldoni and Eighteenth-Century Theatre
1997 0-7734-8465-5
Papers in this volume examines the work of Carlo Goldoni in relation to the output of other theatre writers across Europe in the Age of Enlightenment, and also reconsiders Goldoni's work in the light of new questions raised by recent critical discussions.

Checkpoint - Poems of Death and Old Age a Bilingual Edition of Posto Di Blocco
1991 0-7734-9630-0
Libero Bigiaretti's Checkpoint, is a translation of poetry in Italian into English making the latest work by Italian author Libero Bigaretti available to the North American public. Bigiaretti searches for where the other has become the absolute denial of the reality of the self. What is singular is his perspective of a man who looks at life with the consciousness that his work is done. Bigaretti writes humorously from that narrow strip of no-man’s land between the memory of a meaningful life and the contemplation of death. The book contains an introduction, notes, original text, and translation. Libero Bigiaretti's Checkpoint, is a translation of poetry in Italian into English making the latest work by Italian author Libero Bigaretti available to the North American public. Bigiaretti searches for where the other has become the absolute denial of the reality of the self. What is singular is his perspective of a man who looks at life with the consciousness that his work is done. Bigaretti writes humorously from that narrow strip of no-man’s land between the memory of a meaningful life and the contemplation of death. The book contains an introduction, notes, original text, and translation. Fourteen illustrations by the author are also included.

Christian Inscription at Pompeii
1995 0-7734-8899-5


Commedia Dell'arte From the Renaissance to Dario Fo
1989 0-88946-080-9


Complete Lyric Poems of Dante Alighieri
1997 0-7734-8694-1
Contemporary 'standard' editions of Dante's lyrics do not contain all the poems in the definitive Barbi edition. This translation follows Barbi's format and contains all 118 poems of the definitive text. It follows what is arguably the central issue of Dante's aesthetic: championing vernacular poetry. As Dante relied on his vernacular, these translations rely on the common language of today's speech, free verse, and open form, to give English readers an experience of Dante that is as contemporary to us as his poetic moment was to him. The original Italian appears on facing pages. As with all Mellen books, this book is available at a special text price when ordered for text use.

Complete Lyric Poems of Dante Alighieri
1997 0-7734-8694-1
Contemporary 'standard' editions of Dante's lyrics do not contain all the poems in the definitive Barbi edition. This translation follows Barbi's format and contains all 118 poems of the definitive text. It follows what is arguably the central issue of Dante's aesthetic: championing vernacular poetry. As Dante relied on his vernacular, these translations rely on the common language of today's speech, free verse, and open form, to give English readers an experience of Dante that is as contemporary to us as his poetic moment was to him. The original Italian appears on facing pages. As with all Mellen books, this book is available at a special text price when ordered for text use.

Critical Edition of Giovanni Kreglianovich’s Tragedy Orazio (1797)
2003 0-7734-6740-8


Critical Translation From the Italian of Vincenzo Manfredini’s “difesa Della Musica Moderna/in Defence of Modern Music (1788) ”
2002 0-7734-7087-5


Cultural Heritage of the Italian Renaissance Essays in Honour of T. G. Griffith
1993 0-7734-9396-4
These essays address unifying themes such as the acquisition of knowledge (Fracastoro's theories on the cognitive process); textual criticism (the editing of the works of Livy and Alberti); the academic and social value of humanist studies (the views of Dante and Lombardelli); literary imitation (of the classics and the Bible in Piccolomini, humanists' imitation of each other in the case of Petrarch and Boccaccio); and the reflection of social reality in literature (freedom versus duty in Ariosto and Quarini, marriage and the law in Renaissance comedy, the role of women in the chivalric epic, in comedy and in the novellas of Masuccio, political expediency in Machiavelli and in treatises on the courtier from Castiglione on). An indication of the breadth of the impact of the movement is given by studies which describe its effect on the literary tradition of Wales and on writers of the Enlightenment like Parini.

Dante Alighieri, Il Fiore (the Flower)
2004 0-7734-6526-X
Rediscovered in a manuscript of the Roman de la Rose in 1881, the Fiore comprises a cycle of 232 sonnets tracing the adventures, misfortunes, and triumph of the lover in his pursuit of the rose, all this representing a version of the archetypal text of Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, and preserving in full the brilliance of the original in its ample recourse to irony and parody. The ‘internal signature’ of the poem straightaway gave rise to speculation as to the possibility of the poem’s belonging to Dante. The present edition, which reproduces the now received text of Gianfranco Contini, offers in parallel to this a diplomatic transcription of the sole MS in which the poem survives (Montpellier, Bibliothèque universitaire H438), as well as a lively English translation and three sets of critical and historical apparatus (ecdotic, literary and historical, and interpretative). The detailed introduction provides an account of the historical and linguistic aspects of the text as well as a discussion of its meaning and significance responsive to developments in the sphere of Rose criticism proper. There is a full, up-to-date bibliography, glossary, table of references from the Fiore to the canonical Dante, and specialised rhetorical and technical index.

Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri A Poetic Translation in Iambic Pentameter and Terza Rima
1994 0-7734-9385-9
This is the only translation in the 400-year history of Dante translations into English that is perfectly rhymed. When read metrically, the translation falls into perfect iambic pentameter, and when read naturally, it flows in a meter very similar to Dante's original. This translation avoids the archaisms and awkward syntax of other rhymed translations and is more literally accurate.

Ethics of Retribution in the Decameron and the Late Medieval Italian Novella Beyond the Circle
1993 0-7734-9835-4
This study deals with the depiction of ethically correct punishment in four late medieval Italian novella collections: Boccaccio's Decameron, Fiorentino's Pecorone, Sacchetti's Trecentonovelle, and Sercambi's Novelliere. It analyzes the function of ethics in dozens of short tales which can be profitably studied not only by scholars of Italian and other literatures, but also by students of medieval and Renaissance history, sociology, and philosophy.

Experience of Exile Described by Italian Writers: From Cicero Through Dante and Machiavelli Down to Carlo Levi
2014 0-7734-4507-2
This book identifies the historical and social context of the experience of exile and the degree to which the condition of being exiled influenced literary production of those forced to undergo it.
A fascinating study examining how the legal governmental policy of “exile” can act as a catalyst in the transformation of the person ‘exiled’ from martyr to hero and how the exile process becomes the social –historical instrument that inspires the creative writing of great Italian masterpieces in poetry, rhetoric and philosophy.

Ferdinando by Annibale Ruccello; beautiful Maria by Roberto Cavosi: Voices From the Postwar Generation. a Translation From Italian Into English
2015 1-4955-0380-1
D.D. Carnicelli translated Ferdinando (from Neapolitan); Jane House, Beautiful Maria.This book is part of the multivolume Mellen collection of contemporary Italian drama, which comprises fourteen plays, of which thirteen are first translations. The collection, covering 1950 to 2001, includes introductions to the playwrights, production photographs, a general bibliography of works in English on Italian drama of the period, and bibliographies specific to the playwrights in each book. Jack D. Street wrote the general introduction to the collection. Foreword by Marvin Carlson.


Fictive Mediation and Mediated Fiction in the Novels of Giovanni Verga
2005 0-7734-6107-8
This is a fascinating study on the many ways that immediacy and mediation function in the novels of the nineteenth-century Italian novelist Giovanni Verga (1840-1922). Against the backdrop of an understanding of nineteenth-century realism, the author demonstrates how mediation and “the immediacy impression” function as rhetorical devices in Verga’s writings, and in I Malavoglia in particular. Girard, Bakhtin, and Serres provide important conversation partners for her throughout. The author has translated all of the Italian passages into English and has provided thorough annotation both in the form of endnotes and footnotes. This work makes important contributions to the study of Giovanni Verga and nineteenth-century realism.

G.b. Giraldi's Altile - The Birth of a New Dramatic Genre in Renaissance Ferrara
1992 0-7734-9445-6
This study comprises a critical edition of the complete text of Giraldi's Altile. (The play has been published only once before the present edition, in 1583, ten years after the author's death.) This edition also contains its narrative source, Giraldi's novella (Hecatommithi, II,3). Shows how Giraldi telescoped his unwieldy novella into the formal neo-classical structure of Renaissance tragedy, reinterpreting or even ignoring the precepts of Aristotle when they conflicted with his experience as a practical dramatist writing for the duke and court of Ferrara. He greatly developed the characters of his leading personages, adding an important new character-type to the cast: the first scheming and treacherous subordinate of modern tragedy. The study stresses the importance of the elements of suspense, pathos and maraviglia, and the pains Giraldi took to provide his audience with a lavish, well-staged spectacle. It also emphasizes the fact that the play was intended to convey a series of clearly-defined moral messages.

Gender and Genealogy in Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata
1993 0-7734-9392-1
Using feminist, psychoanalytic, and deconstructionist approaches to Torquato Tasso's 1581 Gerusalemme Liberata (Jerusalem Delivered), this book argues that Tasso explored alternate modes of writing and reading by reflecting on the genealogical tales of his non-Christian women characters, Clorinda, Erminia, and Armida. They permit Tasso to explore what it might mean to ask an alternate series of questions about one's relation to the father. By examining the interpretive and ethical questions that rise from the problematic genealogies of Tasso's orphan daughters, we arrive at a better understanding of the relation between the poem's dominant ideology, on one hand, and the stories that it seeks to suspend and displace on the other.

Giordano Bruno's the Candle-Bearer an Enigmatic Renaissance Play
1997 0-7734-8661-5
This comparative study of Giordano Bruno's Candelaio examines a large number of theatrical authors, from the classical tradition as well as from Italian vernacular and dialect. It takes into account Bruno's recognized sources as well as unknown authors, philosophers as well as poets, playwrights as well as 'poligrafi della penna'. The study concludes that it is the polemic attack on pedantry - in the special sense attributed to it by Bruno - which constitutes the central impulse of Candelaio: a polemic against intellectual obscurantism and degenerated morals. This meaning explains and justifies, emblematically, the title itself: Candelaio is the bearer of the light of truth. Thus, by its very name, the play declares its function, to clarify and enlighten - and claims the ethical significance, as a human and social document, which makes it worth reading.

Giovanni Gentile, The Philosopher of Fascism- Cultural Leadership in Fascist and Anti-Semitic Italy
2017 1-4955-0583-9


Gli Eudemoni- An Italian Renaissance Comedy
1999 0-7734-8191-5
This is the first reliable version of Giraldi's sole comedy, Gli Eudemoni (The Lucky Ones), completed in 1549. The five Acts of the play proper are preceded by a prologue, showing that, in all probability, it was intended for public performance; but there is some doubt as to whether the author ever in fact mounted a production of it. Illustrates the theories on comedy enunciated by the author in the contemporary Discorso intorno al comporre delle comedie e delle tragedie, first published in 1554.

Governess by Vitaliano Brancati: A Post-Pirandello Sicilian Dramatist. A Translation From Italian Into English
2015 1-4955-0366-6
Translation by Jane House. This book is part of the multivolume Mellen collection of contemporary Italian drama, which comprises fourteen plays, of which thirteen are first translations. The collection, covering 1950 to 2001, includes introductions to the playwrights, production photographs, a general bibliography of works in English on Italian drama of the period, and bibliographies specific to the playwrights in each book. Jack D. Street wrote the general introduction to the collection. Foreword by Marvin Carlson.


History of Odessa, the Last Italian Black Sea Colony
2004 0-7734-6272-4
The study reconstructs the Italian protohistory of Odessa, founded in 1794 by the immigrants from Genoa and Naples, Venice and Palermo. For the first time and upon the lengthy and elaborate archival research in Italy and Ukraine, the Odessa of Alexander Pushkin and Anna Akhmatova, battleship Potemkin and Eisenstein, Babel and Kandinsky enters European historiography as a world of the dynasties of De Ribas and Frapoliies, Rossies and Bubbas, Bernadazzies and Riznich, Molinaries, Iorini et al.. Having revised the narratives of the tzarist, Soviet, pre- perestroika and post- Communist past, the monograph not only reclaims the first Italian settlers, but examines the process of forging Europeanness, a cultural identity, beyond the traditional East and West, nation and people. European culture has been notably influenced by Italian civilization, and Odessa is one of the important manifestations of this phenomenon. The book places this 18th century Italian migration to the Black Sea into various contexts- the ancient porto-franco, the12th-14th century Crimea, the persecution of Jesuits and Jews, Risorgimento and Romantic Europe. It challenges the post-modern concept of colonialism by presenting the colonial Other through history and philosophy, semiotics and architecture, history of art and musicology. This history of Odessa not only reveals the neglected European past but imagines the future of the European continent, explaining the role of migration and mechanism of cultural transport.

Ideology of the Decameron
1995 0-7734-9400-6
This work studies the roles of ideology in the production of literature by linguistic and structural analyses of Boccaccio's Decameron. The repeated discursive structure of each novella is analysed to show Boccaccio's understanding of causality. Narrative outcomes are surveyed to show the treatment of characters according to gender, social class, and place of origin. Historical references are compared to their sources to show Boccaccio's political and narrative concerns. This comprehensive analysis produces a new explanation of Boccaccio's beliefs. The final chapters show that when combined with Boccaccio's aesthetic program and applied to his sources, these ideological beliefs generate the text.

Il Mito E L'llegoria Nella Narrativa Di Paola Masino
2004 0-7734-6435-2
In Italian.

This book is on Paola Masino who wrote prolifically during the Fascist dictatorship. She belonged to the European and international intelligentsia of the time and her work was widely read and reviewed. Her short stories were published in the most prestigious Italian literary magazines and her first novel Monte Ignoso was awarded the 1931 Viareggio Literary Prize.

Paola Masino’s narrative explores the realm of myths, allegories, dreams and hallucinations in order to break down the boundaries between rationality and irrationality and to expose the fundamental contradictions and limitations of reality. Life and death, the alienation and the tragedy of modern man, the changing realities of the traditional nuclear family, as well as the exploration of women self-representation and identity, are the dominant themes in her narrative. Masino’s discourse challenges patriarchal authority and the representation of models of femininity by putting into question the ideology of the woman-mother/caretaker of family and angel of domesticity promoted by the Fascist regime. Masino’s work was never censured by the regime. However, because of her strong experimental writing - from surrealism to magic realism, from the absurd to the grotesque – her narrative was qualified as “defeatist,” and she was personally criticized for “writing like a man.”

Paola Masino’s official literary production stopped shortly after WWII when Massimo Bontempelli, her life companion, fell ill. A well-known member of the Academy of Italy, Bontempelli died in 1960 and Masino dedicated the rest of her life to the publication and organization of his literary legacy. There is no doubt that Masino’s contributions have been overshadowed by Bontempelli’s stature and preeminence. However, Paola Masino is truly an avant-garde writer whose talent, complex style and independent voice fully contribute to the literature of twentieth-century Italy.

Italian Renaissance Festivals and their European Influence
1992 0-7734-9608-4
Essays from a specialist seminar held at University of Warwick, April 1990, under the auspices of Graduate school of Renaissance Studies. The essays examine festival occasions taking place between 1560 and 1660, and draw attention to some of the more vigorous developments of the form of political theater, not only in Italy but also Denmark, France, England, and the German-speaking states.

Italian Theater of the Grotesque
2003 0-7734-6738-6
This anthology fills a lacuna in the investigation of European avant-garde theater, from Alfred Jarry’s Ubu Roi to the New Theater of the Absurd. The introduction justifies the place of the Italian Theater of the Grotesque, and the text remedies the lack of access to its plays by translating the ones included in the anthology into English. Of the seven representative plays, five have never been translated into English before.

Italian Travel Writings
2011 0-7734-3943-9
Analysis and examination of the travel fiction of Lucette Desvignes, for the first time in English, that uses the author’s own experiences, as well as the Lucette’s characters, to show how she changed the genre.

Italian Women’s Narratives of Their Experiences During World War II
2003 0-7734-6880-3
This book provides an in-depth cultural study that will interest scholars in anthropology, women’s studies, and history. In particular it presents a study of Orsognese women’s narratives of their experience in World War II, presenting a detailed account of the author’s ethnographic field practice showing that the patterns that emerge from the narratives are an integral part of the contemporary Orsognese social context. It examines these as concepts of sociability, relatedness, and community, based on principles of social interaction the Orsognese women manifested in their social practice.

Italy and the Economic and Monetary Union
2006 0-7734-5768-2
This book analyzes Italy’s policy toward European monetary integration from the creation of the European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957 to the final stage of Economic and Monetary Union in 1999 and the first five years thereafter. It is argued that “ideas,” in the form of “policy paradigms,” are crucial in framing member states’ trajectories in the European Union (EU) and they are therefore core components of the process of Europeanization. Policy paradigms need to be contextualized by considering the evolution of domestic institutions.

According to the foreign policy paradigm that prevailed in Italy from the Second World War until the late 1990s, “Europe” has been of paramount priority, which has been associated with its political, economic and cultural modernization. The economic policy paradigm, instead, has shifted from Keynesian economics in the 1960s and 1970s to the monetarist-inspired, stability-oriented paradigm of the 1980s and 1990s. The pro-European foreign policy paradigm explains why Italian policymakers decided to join all the European monetary initiatives, whereas the economic paradigm, which, for most of the time, was far apart from the stability-oriented paradigm embedded in European monetary regimes, explains Italy’s difficult adaptation. The book concludes by pointing out that the foreign policy paradigm has begun to shift since the late 1990s.

La Rappresentazione Del Paesaggio Nella Letteratura E Nel Cinema Dell'italia Contemporanea / the Representation of Landscape in Contemporary Italian Literature and Cinema
2013 0-7734-4550-1
This book shows how landscape, place, and territory play a crucial role in all forms of aesthetic communication. Whether real, mythological, fantastic, allegorical, or symbolic, they are essential constituents of the verbal and visual construction of an artwork. The authors show how space determines narrative plots and shapes emotional, rational, and social tendencies of any aesthetic expression. The analysis has shifted from the principles of mimesis to recent critical attention given to specific perspectives in different cultural lenses. This volume, edited by two enterprising scholars especially interested in mapping new trends in Italian literature and cinema, is a brilliant collection of theoretical and analytical essays. These writings explore the issues of aesthetics from a plurality of angles related to the literary and cinematic treatment of space.

Letteratura Come Fantasticazione: in Conversazione Con Gianni Celati
2009 0-7734-3900-5
This volume examines the role of Gianni Celati in shaping Italian fiction and culture since the 1960s as a leading narrator, writer, scholar, translator and filmmaker. In Italian

Life and Career of Lippo Di Dalmasio, a Bolognese Painter of the Late Fourteenth Century: with Illustrations and a Catalogue of His Works
2010 0-7734-3684-7
This book provides an historical and critical framework for the paintings of Lippo di Dalmasio. The catalogue presents 37 items in total, including many new attributions and some previously unpublished works. This is accompanied by all known documents on the artist. This book contains eight color photographs and thirty-five black and white photographs.

Life of Cardinal Innocenzo del Monte. A Scandal in Scarlet
1997 0-7734-8581-3
This book gathers for the first time virtually all that is known about the last of the unreformed and unregenerate cardinals of the sixteenth century, Innocenzo Ciocchi del Monte, the adopted cardinal-nephew of Pope Julius III. At the same time, it contains a wealth of material, some of it never explored before, on the del Monte family in general, and Julius III in particular. It also explores in detail the dynastic connections of the del Monte and illuminates some of the leading parts played by the family in the case of the divorce of Henry VIII, the rise of the Jesuits, and in the perils of the Order of St. John in that time.

Lord Charlemont's History of Italian Poetry From Dante to Metastasio a Critical Edition From the Autograph Manuscript Vol. 1
2000 0-7734-7782-9
Lord Charlemont conceived of his three-volume history of Italian poetry as a contribution to the reputation in the English-speaking world of the Italian literary tradition, by means of a substantial annotated anthology of texts, with his translations in parallel. Over 300 pages of his 1600 page manuscript are dedicated to Dante, easily the most detailed treatment in English before the work of professional scholars in the nineteenth century. Charlemont was a will-known scholarly figure of the Johnsonian period. This critical edition presents Charlemonts facing page translations of each authors work.

Lord Charlemont’s History of Italian Poetry From Dante to Metastasio a Critical Edition From the Autograph Manuscript Vol. 1
2000 0-7734-7780-2
Lord Charlemont conceived of his three-volume history of Italian poetry as a contribution to the reputation in the English-speaking world of the Italian literary tradition, by means of a substantial annotated anthology of texts, with his translations in parallel. Over 300 pages of his 1600 page manuscript are dedicated to Dante, easily the most detailed treatment in English before the work of professional scholars in the nineteenth century. Charlemont was a will-known scholarly figure of the Johnsonian period. This critical edition presents Charlemont’s facing page translations of each author’s work.

Lord Charlemont’s History of Italian Poetry From Dante to Metastasio a Critical Edition From the Autograph Manuscript Vol. 3
2000 0-7734-7784-5
Lord Charlemont conceived of his three-volume history of Italian poetry as a contribution to the reputation in the English-speaking world of the Italian literary tradition, by means of a substantial annotated anthology of texts, with his translations in parallel. Over 300 pages of his 1600 page manuscript are dedicated to Dante, easily the most detailed treatment in English before the work of professional scholars in the nineteenth century. Charlemont was a will-known scholarly figure of the Johnsonian period. This critical edition presents Charlemont’s facing page translations of each author’s work.

Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936) - His Plays in Sicilian Volume 1: Sicilian Limes; Think It Over, Giacuminu; the Cap with the Jingle Bells; Liolà; the Jar; the Vise
1998 0-7734-8337-3
English translation of Pirandello's original Sicilian plays, retaining the names of the original characters, their dialogue, with all the peculiarities and characteristics of the Sicilian tongue and the nature and flavor of their mores, thus underscoring the fact that Sicily and Sicilians are different ethnically, culturally and linguistically from continental Italians. Volume 1 also contains the Preface, a complete list of Pirandello's plays, and an introduction setting Pirandello's life and Sicilian plays in context.

Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936) - His Plays in Sicilian Volume 2: The Balance; Cappiddazzu Pays for Everything; the License; the Cyclops; Glaucus; with Kid Gloves
1998 0-7734-8339-X
English translation of Pirandello's original Sicilian plays, retaining the names of the original characters, their dialogue, with all the peculiarities and characteristics of the Sicilian tongue and the nature and flavor of their mores, thus underscoring the fact that Sicily and Sicilians are different ethnically, culturally and linguistically from continental Italians. Volume 1 also contains the Preface, a complete list of Pirandello's plays, and an introduction setting Pirandello's life and Sicilian plays in context.

Luigi Pirandello the Theatre of Paradox
1997 0-7734-8746-8
The purpose of these essays is to enable readers to broaden an deepen their knowledge of Luigi Pirandello and his influence on the drama of the twentieth century. the essays have been grouped loosely under four headings: issues of theory, issues of genre, issues of gender, and issues of language and theatre. Essays include:

Marcello Giovanetti a Poet of the Early Roman Baroque
1990 0-88946-146-5
Focuses on the inventive range of Giovanetti's poetic imagery, which has never been studied, and on its art-historical ramifications.

Marcia Su Roma E Dintorni/the March on Rome and Thereabouts an Autobiographical Account by a Leading Sardinian Republican Politician of Resistance to Fascism in Sardinia From 1918-1930
1993 0-7734-9558-4
The thrust of these symposium papers engaged the development of perspective in early modern England, an evolution in thought and practice that crossed disciplinary lines to be felt in the art, literature, and history of England. Individual papers explore perspectives on representation (e.g., history in fiction and fiction in history); development of frames for historical and literary narratives and their impact on point of view; implications of coordinate developments in painting and narrative, such as simultaneous introduction of fixed-point perspective and third person narrative; and the relationship between fact and fiction as they were defined in early modern England. The essays alter current perspectives on the origins of the early modern period, connecting new insights into intellectual developments to their embodiment in the art, literature, and history of the period.

Medieval Optics and Theories of Light in the Works of Dante
2000 0-7734-7808-6
This study investigates Dante’s knowledge of several traditions of the extensive medieval literature on light and optics and examines how he assimilates and reworks related imagery, themes, and motifs in his writing. “Gilson’s account demonstrates the extent to which in Dante’s mind art and science are closely akin. Equally, he provides a valuable survey of the debates which were current in Dante’s time in the field of optics (as well as revealing the deficiencies of most recent studies of the issue). The book is written with great clarity and considerable subtlety in the analysis of Dante’s text. It draws together material from a wide range of medieval sources and is likely to be of interest as much to the student of medieval philosophy as to readers of the Commedia.” – Dr. R. Kirkpatrick

Monastic Art in Lorenzo Monaco's Florence
2006 0-7734-5968-5
Locked inside the walls of a severely cloistered monastery, monks from the Camaldolese house of Santa Maria degli Angeli had access to some of the most innovative paintings produced in Florence between 1350 and 1425. Leading painters of the day, like Nardo di Cione and Lorenzo Monaco, filled manuscripts and decorated altars with richly ornamented pictures that related directly to liturgical passages recited – and theological positions embraced – by members of the institution. In a city marked by wealthy and sophisticated ecclesiastical communities, the one at Santa Maria degli Angeli had few peers.

Dependent on the benefices of a powerful network of patronage, the monks in Santa Mara degli Angeli counted among their staunchest allies families associated with the most important political alliances in Florence, and by 1378 the monastery was considered by many to be closely linked to the city’s most potent families. Monks executed a variety of tasks and obligations which took place throughout the year. Among these was a lengthy and solemn procession, held on specific feast days, that took the community to every altar and altarpiece in the monastic complex. The route they took and the images they saw caused each participant to see his collection of images in sequence, and thus encouraged him to consider the altarpieces in his environment both individually and collectively. The culmination of this procession came to be the extraordinary high altarpiece produced by Lorenzo Monaco in 1413, the Coronation of the Virgin, which summarized both the entire program of monastic imagery in Santa Maria degli Angeli and the importance of individual patronage in Europe’s most progressive and potent city-state. This work examines and explains the appearance, function, and uses of painting in one of the day’s most important cultural centers.

Because of the size of the book and the large number of photographs, this book is priced at $179.95.

Mystery of the Sicilian Sub-Dialect, Sanfratellan, Transformed in the Twelfth Century by the Normans, the ProvenÇals and the Gallo-Italians
2002 0-7734-7034-4
This is a philological study of Sanfratellan, whose origin has baffled scholars for centuries. It demonstrates, through language analysis, that when the Normans invaded Sicily in the 11th century, they left in San Fratello a large contingent of Frenchmen from the south of France. These soldier-settlers spoke Provençal, which over the years melded with the town’s proto-Sicilian to form an amalgam which now sounds as French as it does Sicilian. It is understood only by Sanfratellans and not by any other Sicilians. This study is one of the most outstanding contributions to Italian dialectology of the 20th century; yet it reads like an exciting historical whodunit. It will be of interest to language scholars and historians as well as anyone interested in Italy and its past.

Napoleon and Pozzo Di Borgo in Corsica and After, 1764-1821
1996 0-7734-8853-7
This is the first scholarly study of the intertwined careers in Corsica of Napoleon and his rival, Pozzo di Borgo,and of the feud that followed. It is based on essential and rare primary archival sources. This is the first account of Pozzo di Borgo as the Bonapartes' family lawyer. It provides fresh information on the Bonaparte family's lawsuits. It is based on exhaustive scrutiny of the private Pozzi Di Borgo family papers, particularly the Memoirs of C. A. Pozzo di Borgo, as well as contemporary documents from the Archives Nationales, the Bibliothèque Nationale, the Public Record Office, the British Library, the National Library of Scotland, the Corsican Departmental Archives, (and particularly the papers of the Royal Jurisdiction of Ajaccio), and Princeton University Library. What emerges is a portrait of the young Napoleon different from the conventional one, suggesting that he was much less important in Corsica than often portrayed. The outstanding importance of Pozzo di Borgo in Corsican politics and in the expulsion of the Bonapartes from Corsica is clearly established. The last chapter, drawing on the widest ever range of sources, revises the established account of the epochal struggle between Napoleon and Pozzo from 1796 to Napoleon's death, situating it in the context of international relations.

Napoleonic Imperialism and the Savoyard Monarchy 1773-1821 State Building in Piedmont
1997 0-7734-8609-7
Ancien régime Piedmont is a little-studied area, and so there exists a geographical and conceptual imbalance in the historiography of the Napoleonic era which this work addresses. It concentrates on the character and shape of mainstream political life in an area representative of the much of the territory controlled by the Napoleonic régime. It illustrates that the major problems of law and order and political polarization which beset the Revolutionary period did not disappear under Napoleon. They preoccupied his government as much as those of his predecessors. These problems, rather than ideological questions of national unity - were the chief concern of his Italian subjects, and so the question of law and order stands at the center of this work. Chapter headings include: the Absolutist Heritage; Crisis of the Ancien Régime; Patriots in Piedmontese Society; French Policy After Annexation; Resistance & Repression; Defence of Society; Resentment & Ralliement; Restoration & Reaction.

Nine Sicilian Plays by Luigi Capuana: Translated From Sicilian Into English by Santi Buscemi
2016 1-4955-0427-1
The father of Italian dialect theater Luigi Capuana (1839-1915) embraced the literary movement verismo (Italian realism). His major plays, with their emphasis on naturalism and objectivity over symbolism, have now been beautifully translated for an English readership and audience.

Nineteenth Century in Odessa
2007 0-7734-5361-X
This new study, drawing its inspiration from A History of Odessa, the Last Italian Black Sea Colony (The Edwin Mellen Press, 2004) and based on new archival findings, focuses solely on the eternal cultural legacy of the Italian founders of this unique port, shaped by nearly a century of Italian presence. The work reveals how Odessa Italians constructed a cultural bridge between Eastern and Western Europe via Odessa Italian Opera. The work demonstrates how the exploration of the New Russia by the Odessa Italians helped the Russian Empire to make a leap into modernity, giving them a touch of the Renaissance that the country had skipped, and bringing the Enlightenment that the Empire had seen briefly. This new contribution to European cultural history will be of interest to scholars of European, Italian, Russian and Ukrainian history, art historians and musicologists, as well as students of migration and multiculturalism. This book contains 10 color photographs and 20 black and white photographs.

Petrarch’s Influence on the Iconography of the Carrara Palace in Padua
2008 0-7734-5236-2
This book examines Petrarch’s relationship with Francesco il Vecchio da Carrara, lord of Padua, who was the poet’s host during his final years (1367-74), and for whom he started to rewrite his great work of Roman history, the De Viris Illustribus. The exemplary purpose of this text was extended in the form of a major fresco cycle in the Sala Virorum Illustrium of the Carrara palace in Padua, the Reggia. This book contains 10 black and white photographs.

Piave, Boito, Pirandello - From Romantic Realism to Modernism
2000 0-7734-7703-9
This study is the first to forge a direct link between the Italian theatre of the post-romantic period, the adaptation of Shakespeare’s Othello by Boito and the theatre of the absurd of Pirandello. It traces the significance of the fusion of genre through the symbolic images appertaining to light-darkness, beauty/ugliness, youth/age. It demonstrates the rediscovery of Evil and its application to psychological manipulation as seen in the poetry of the writers of Scapigliatura Milanese, of the late 19th-century. Emphasis is placed on the externalization of the inner conflict, with the psychological victim assuming the roles of manipulated monster and controlled marionette. Finally, the work is the first to consider in juxtaposition the place of Jester (Piave, Rigoletto) and Puppet (Pirandello, Il berretto a sonagli), and how they provide a link between he tragically comical and the absurd.

Pier Paolo Pasolini and the Theatre of the Word
1989 0-7734-2002-9
This study examines, from a variety of critical perspectives, Pasolini's complex, paradoxical, and eclectic drama. This book offers the most comprehensive study of Pasolini's theatre to date in any language.

Pirandello Studies/l'attualita De Pirandello. Selected Essays From the Harvard Symposium
1991 0-7734-9709-9


Poetics and Literature of the Sicilian Diaspora Studies in Oral History and Story Telling
1993 0-7734-2226-9
This study incorporates over forty oral histories of Sicilian emigrants to North Italy, Germany, South Africa, and America, collected upon their return in 1988 to their hometown of Trappeto, a village of about 3,000 inhabitants in Palermo Province. The documents are analyzed as subjective/objective, or inter-subjective sources for understanding of a people's emigration. The multi-disciplinary approach includes anthropological, folkloric, poetico-literary, historical and sociological aspects. It reveals a still-vital Sicilian culture. As contribution to the work of conservation, the Trappetese oral histories are transcribed verbatim, translated faithfully, and printed in the final chapter.

Politics of Opera in Turn-Of-The-Century Italy as Seen Through the Letters Alfredo Catalani
1992 0-7734-9230-5
Catalani's letters contain a fascinating eyewitness account of the process of creating opera in turn-of-the-century Italy. They show what he and his contemporaries, among them Puccini, Mascagni, Leoncavallo, and Giordano, went through to obtain a libretto, arrange a premiere, and encourage subsequent productions of a new score. And, since there is no English-language biography of Catalani, this volume also provides readers not versed in Italian an opportunity to learn about the composer of La Wally and Loreley.

Reception of Giacomo Leopardi in the Nineteenth Century: Italy’s Greatest Poet After Dante?
2008 0-7734-4972-8
This work studies new aspects of the reception of Giacomo Leopardi within the context of Risorgimento culture and European nineteenth-century culture."

Reconsideration of Aldo Palazzeschi’s Poetry (1905-1974) Revisiting the Saltimbanco
1998 0-7734-8270-9
Reconsiders the entire corpus of Aldo Palazzeschi’s poetry by examining text produced over seventy years.

Reference Grammar of Medieval Italian according to Dante, with a dual edition of the Vita Nova
1998 0-7734-7727-6
This study reconstructs the grammar of medieval Italian, as used by Dante in his Vita Nova. It is divided into three parts: I – The Grammar; II – A listing of the medieval lexicon in the Vita; and III – a facing page translation of the medieval Italian and English translation of the Vita. This is a work long-needed by Romance language, Italian scholars, and Danteists.

Royal Poorhouse in 18th Century Turin, Italy
2001 0-7734-7364-5


Scenery, Set and Staging in the Italian Renaissance Studies in the Practice of Theatre
1996 0-7734-8814-6
Papers collected in this volume were given at the Arts Centre, Aberystwyth, in March, 1993, at a conference organised to coincide with the English premiere of the first English-language staging of Pietro Aretino's Talanta. Grants had been obtained to construct the Roman perspective set described with such enthusiasm by contemporaries such as Vasari and Aretino himself for the Venice staging of the play in 1542. According to current research, the set has been seen as one of the earliest attempts to reproduce a real place on a stage with topographical accuracy. This set had been reconstructed full-size on the Aberystwyth stage according to the suggested source, and the play had been translated, adapted with new music and modern choreography. Experts on Renaissance theatre practice and in particular on aspects of staging and set-design gathered for this conference. Contains many photographs and drawings.

Selene
1996 0-7734-8745-X
Selene is quintessential court theater, written by a courtier, performed before courtiers, and depicting events at a fictitious court. This volume proposes that after 1546, when he entered the service of the Duke of Ferrara as Secretary, Giraldi the playwright had more practical and pressing concerns than the pursuit of literary fame. Charged with the organization of dramatic entertainment, his prime obligation was to devise lively theatrical spectacles for the enjoyment and edification of his peers at court, and he used the theater as an instrument of moral and religious persuasion and as a vehicle for dynastic propaganda. In 1546 Giampaolo Manfrone had been convicted of two assassination attempts against Duke Ercole; it was politically apt, therefore, that Giraldi's choice of plot for the cautionary drama Selene should have been the downfall of a power-hungry noble intent upon murdering his sovereign. The introduction discusses personal experiences and cultural influences at work in Selene. Chapter I examines Giraldi's exposé of court life written for the guidance of an aspiring young courtier and based on his knowledge of the Ferrarese court. Chapter II illustrates his close rapport, as dramatist, with the Duke. Chapter III sets the play in the context of the burgeoning contemporary literature concerning the excellence of women. The Notes to the play comment on its ideological content, resolve syntactical problems, and clarify the movements of the actors on stage. The Glossary lists all word-forms found in the text not represented in modern Italian.

Sense Perception in Dante's Commedia
1996 0-7734-8795-6
This work traces the literary tradition of metaphysical 'light' from archaic times, and discusses the medieval ideas on sense perceptions and contrasts the differences between Aristotelian and Platonist ideas about perception. There is a cautionary exposition of the 'Three Dantes' found in the poem: the historical Dante Alighieri, the Dante-poeta, and Dante-personaggio. Indentification is made of the binary rather than the usually accepted triadic structure of Dante's poem: the dichotomies such as ignorance/knowledge, unity/variety, contrapasso, frequeny of turning, and the assistance which the binary structure gives to the subject of Freewill. Christian applications of Freewill and Divine Will in the poem are reflected against the thought of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Boethius, and Aquinas. After recognizing the dark tone of the Inferno and the increased illumination of the Purgatorio, the Divine Light of the Paradiso is related to Patristic thought, particularly from the Cappadocian Fathers. Medieval beliefs on illumination and imagination are examined, particularly from the thought of Robert Grosseteste and on to Ficino. Conclusions drawn range from ancient through to Dante's medieval masterpiece and look ahead to later literary uses of metaphysical light linked with insight, such as Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Tasso's Gerusalemme Liberata, and Milton's Paradise Lost.

Sicily - A Literary and Cultural History
2003 0-7734-3461-5
This is a volume on the ancient and esoteric history of Sicily. The reader can see through the eyes of the author-turned-poet how Sicily evolved and how its children became mature adults. It tells of the poetic contribution that its people have given to the world.

Social Awareness and Political Awakening Among the Peasants and Fishermen of Sicily as Reflected in Giovanni Verga's novelle
2005 0-7734-6133-7


Sociological and Economic Change in the Peasant Society of Troina, Sicily
1992 0-7734-9469-3
A study conducted in 1963-64 in a small village in the Sicilian interior focused on how people could improve their living standard through cooperation. In 1988-89, two persons who worked on the original study returned to the same village. Troina has 2,000 fewer inhabitants, no factory exists, and unemployment is still high. However, new houses have been built, cars are to be seen everywhere. Miseria (extreme poverty) is a thing of the past. Despite this, locals still consider the future with insecurity, and the younger generations see no alternative to emigration. The present study explores this contradiction.

Study of the Theology and the Imagery of Dante's Divina Commedia Sensory Perception, Reason and Free Will
1991 0-7734-9650-5
Dante interprets for the modern world the Aristotelian via media between Platonism and pre-Socratic sensism that teaches the interdependency of the body and soul in the recognition and interpretation of physical, intellectual, and moral truth. Philosophical and religious dogma, secular and sacred verities must be perceived through the physical senses before they can be comprehended by the rational mind. This is an analysis of Dante's presentation of the poet's experiences during the extraordinary journey that is narrated in the Divina Commedia.

Text, Translation, and Critical Interpretation of Joan Rois De Corella's Tragedia De Caldesa, a Fifteenth-Century Spanish Tragedy of Gender Reversal
2012 0-7734-2625-6
This monograph on Joan Roís de Corella (1435-1497) offers to the English-speaking world the discovery of a prominent literary figure, worth of recognition as a leading exponent of the Renaissance in the Catalan domain. Peter Cocozzella intends to bring into focus Corella’s distinctive contribution as embodied in a work that bears the title of Tragèdia de Caldesa (‘Tragedy of Caldesa’). Contrary to the trend of criticism that flatly denies the stage-worthy qualities of this magnificent text, Cocozzella proposes that Corella’s masterpiece constitutes a full-fledged theatricalization of a form of tragedy that stems not from Aristotelian principles but, rather, from the description formulated by Isidore of Seville. Corella delves into a radically conflictive interaction of male and female characters. Arguably, his Tragèdia trans-values the Ovidian myth of Narcissus into the ambiance of the Hispanic “erotic hell” and reveals that the theme of emasculation in literature goes back at least to the fifteenth century.

Theatrical Works of Giovacchino Forzano - Drama for Mussolini’s Italy
2000 0-7734-7726-8
This monograph is the first major study of Giovacchino Forzano’s theatrical works in either English or Italian. Forzano’s success as a writer and practitioner working in the popular theater in Italy has usually been ascribed to his well-known artistic relationship with Mussolini, but this study goes beyond that. By a detailed analysis of his major plays and contemporary reactions to them, the study shows how Forzano was able successfully to reflect the interests and concerns of contemporary, largely middle-class audiences. It show how he was able to exploit his skills as a dramatist to articulate and exploit contemporary emotions, the study includes the annotated text of a play, Racconti d’autunno, d’inverno e primavera (1937), here published for the first time. It is an interesting example of propagandistic drama whose aim was to celebrate the triumphs of the fascist regime.

Three Renaissance Comedies
1991 0-7734-9450-2
This volume collects three Italian Renaissance comedies not readily available to the English-speaking reader and director: Ariosto's Lena (never before translated into English); Ruzante's Posh Talk (also never translated from the Paduan and Bergamask dialects); and Aretino's Talanta. Of contrasting styles, they share some characteristics, which mirror the advance of all Italian literature from humanism to the Counter-reformation, from Bembo to Sperone Speroni and from rudimentary or symbolic staging to a comparatively sophisticated realism in the treatment of stage space. With illustrations.

Tourism and the History of Taormina, Sicily, 1750-1950
2001 0-7734-7678-4
In the making of a tourist resort, the strangers and their presence are only half the matter; the other half is the local people and their reactions. This study examines what the Taorminese did to develop their resources, the image and myth of Taormina, reconstructing its history from the local people’s point of view. The social organization of the community, its urban statute and sentiment, its first contact with outsiders, its history and monuments, its popular culture and sense of identiy are carefully investigated.

Tragedies of G.-B. Giraldi Cinthio the Transformation of Narrative Source Into Stage Play
1997 0-7734-8636-4
This study examines the creative processes by which Giraldi transforms his narrative source, usually a novella from his own Hecatommithi, into a five act drama, conforming, more or less, to the conventions of 'regular' classical tragedy. Giraldi, devising these entertainments for the court of his patron, Ercole II, Duke of Ferrara, begins each play by designing an appropriate stage set of the Serlian type (the perspective of a city), to be built and painted by professional artists under his direction; he than adds to the plot new personages, drawn from court life or reflecting topical problems, and places these in situations of tension, with moments of surprise and occasional outbursts of violence. This study demonstrates these points by giving a summary of the relevant novella, followed by a scene by scene synopsis of the play. The detailed synopses will allow all students of drama to appreciate the nature of Giraldi's court entertainments by drawing attention to the non-literary aspects of his dramaturgy, to décor, movement and spectacle. With illustrations.

Transforming Street Urchins Into Adult Sailors on the Training Ship
2014 0-7734-4247-2
This newly discovered educational experiment documents the extraordinary work of Giulia Civita Franceschi in her mission to transform the street urchins of Naples (1913-1928) into living models of dignified conscientious citizens by redeeming them from juvenile delinquency, crime and prison through maritime training on the ship “Caracciolo”.

Translation From
2012 0-7734-4078-X
The present study is divided into three parts, the first of which is an in-depth introduction by Carlo Fanelli to the authors and problems of 16th century Renaissance Italian dialect comedy and the relevance of a playwright such as Angelo Beolco (RUZANTE). Particular attention is paid to the comedy from the point of view of the social problems presented by veterans or deserters after long and socially disastrous wars. The second part is a short introduction to the manuscript history of RUZANTE’s dialect comedy El Parlamento prior its printing by Stefano Alessi at Venice in 1551. The Verona Codex 36 is datable to 1524, the Marciana (Venice) IT.XI,66 (in worse conditions as a manuscript) is of a later period (1526-1542), the first probably used by the playwright to prepare the comedy for staging: Verona Codex 36 is here presented in the third part with suggested modifications and a possible theatrical translation into modern English. Parts 2 and 3 are by John B Trumper.

Translation From Italian Into English of Ugo Foscolo's le Grazie (the Graces): Tempio Eretto E Poema Scolpito in Parole: 'le Grazie' Di Ugo Foscolo. Nuova Versione Inglese Annotata Con Introduzione E Note
2013 0-7734-3057-1
The present work provides an entirely unique translation of nineteenth century Italian writer Ugo Foscolo’s universally unknown, yet aesthetically superb poem “The Graces.” Originally written in Neoclassical Italian, Foscolo’s poem embraces all which is “harmonious” and “beautiful”?in ancient Greek and Roman art and poetry as well as in Neoclassical aesthetics. Those qualities mentioned above which renowned poets such as Homer, Catullus, Virgil and others have savored in their writings, and find full artistic expression in “The Graces," which, assuming the identity of a temple or a sculpture, celebrates the creation of poetry itself. It is the sweetness and the euphony of the Graces' gentle affections, welcomed into even the hearts of poets like Dante, Lord Byron, and John Keats, which placate or rather "subdue" mankind's violent, feral nature and arouse in man a love for poeticizing. Dr. Needham’s translation in English not only retains the authentic flavor of Foscolo’s Italian poem and all that Neoclassicalism embodies, but also includes insightful criticism concerning other English translations of the poem. There are also unique commentaries on certain verses in the text which allude to themes of sensuality and eroticism seen in the rococo works of French painters such as Fragonard and Watteau contrasted with themes of purity and modesty noted in the works of French artist Jacques-Louis David and Antonio Canova. It is precisely to this inspiring nineteenth century Italian sculptor that Ugo Foscolo dedicates his poetic opus.

Two Parallel Realities of Alberti and Cennini - The Power of Writing and the Visual Arts in the Italian Quattrocento
2004 0-7734-6501-4
By challenging the traditional assumption that the historian’s expertise may allow for a superior understanding of the artwork, this study has wide-ranging implications that will make it relevant to many fields. The book examines the art treatises of Cennino Cennini and Leon Battista Alberti. In the official interpretation Alberti’s On Painting is the most important events for the development of Renaissance artistic style. Instead Cennini is repeatedly considered a representative of a medieval school of painting, the earliest artist-writer on the borderline with the medieval period; thus, the prevailing historical picture is one of progressive evolution, from the elementary conception of Cennini, mostly preoccupied with technical problems, to Alberti’s superior theoretical understanding of the painting process. The official interpretation of Cennini and Alberti exemplifies in essence the confusion between art practice and art theory which has been amplified and perpetuated from the Renaissance to the present. In fact, while the importance of Alberti’s writing for Renaissance art is overblown, the official interpretation of Cennini’s work contains serious flaws. It represents a clear case in which the excess of theoretical projection has obscured factors of the utmost importance for the understanding of Renaissance art practice. This work demonstrates that Cennini’s historical position has been misinterpreted and that his treatise, the Libro dell’arte, belongs to the same period in which Alberti wrote his On Painting. It also suggests that the progressive expansion of theoretical speculation has hindered our ability to perceive Renaissance art in a historically-informed, period-appropriate way.

Venetian State Theater and the Games of Siena, 1595-1605 the Grimani Banquet Plays
1994 0-7734-9424-3
This study examines for the first time the thirty-eight anonymous plays performed at the state banquets that Doge Marino Grimani was required by law to offer four times a year for the leading senators and magistrates of the Venetian Republic. Explores the patronage, audience, site, performers, and music of the first performances, and places their ideological content in the context of the Venice of 1600. It finds that their most unusual feature is a ludic use of rhetoric which betrays the influence of the Sienese veglia games. These games, which called for wit, verbal skill, and variety of response, had recently penetrated Venice by means of Girolamo Bargagli's Dialogo de' Giuochi. They inspired the creation of a new theatrical form. A stylistic analysis of the Grimani plays suggests that all but one are the work of a single author, most likely Enea Piccolomini, a figure hitherto unknown to scholarship, and to whom one of the plays has traditionally been attributed.

Woman Writer in Late Nineteenth-Century Italy Gender and the Formation of Literary Identity
1992 0-7734-9530-4
Essays in this collection examine the processes underlying the formation of literary identity in four of the most important and widely-read Italian women novelists of the late 19th century, all of whom were in varying degrees involved in the ongoing debate on the changing role of women in Italian society at that time : Neera, Matilde Serao, the Marchesa Colombi, and Sibilla Aleramo. This study concentrates on the novelty and complexity of their enterprise as women writing in the specific social, cultural and literary context of late 19th-century Italy, and continues the project of reconstructing and mapping the place of women writers in the English and Continental traditions. A concluding chapter examines Luigi Pirandello's Suo Marita (1911), a relatively little-known novel portraying a woman writer in turn-of-the-century Italy from the perspective of a male writer.

Women and Feminine Images in Giacomo Leopardi, 1798-1837 Bicentenary Essays
1999 0-7734-7929-5
This is the first comprehensive study in English on the role of female characters and feminine imagery in Leopardi. It offers a multi-faceted approach, places his views on women in context, examines thematic concerns, formal practices and ideological positioning of the time, and focuses on the impact of contemporary women writers such as Madame de Stael and Madame de Lambert on Leopardi’s philosophical writings and literary theory. It brings together biographical, philosophical and literary aspects of Leopardi’s works in relation to the notion, influence and depiction of women and feminine images. With illustrations “All the basic questions of Leopardian criticism are clearly and persuasively reviewed. Press and Williams have produced a perceptive work on Leopardi’s poetry tout court, its genesis in the culture of the Enlightenment, and its literary sources with particular reference to Madame de Stael. . . . the book contains the fullest study of this subject in recent years and will be compulsory reading for anyone interested in it. Most importantly, the book does not look at Leopardi from a narrow feminist or post-feminist standpoint. . . . There is . . . much close textual analysis of the major cants to endear Williams and Press to generations of students.” – Italian Studies “. . . very thoroughly researched and clearly and interestingly written. . . . an original contribution to scholarship. . . .the book will attract the attention of Leopardi scholars internationally. While the authors eschew the more strident forms of feminism fashionable in academic circles, they sensitively explore the role of women in Leopardi’s life and works and the pervasive presence of female figures in his poetry. Particularly pleasing is the way in which Williams and Press situate Leopardi in both an Italian and a European tradition.” – Brian Moloney

Writers and Performers in Italian Drama From the Time of Dante to Pirandello
1991 0-7734-9717-X
These essays cover much of the span of Italian drama, from its origins, via the Renaissance and the 19th century, to Pirandello and versions for radio and theatre of Svevo's best-known novel. Contributors raise interesting questions concerning the nature of drama and how and where it can be identified.