Subject Area: Social Justice/Social Theory

Aesthetics of Contemporary Spanish American Social Protest Poetry
1990 0-88946-591-6
Explores Latin social conditions and the poets' world, the aesthetics of protest, aesthetic exhaustion and iconoclastic poetry, the aestheticization of the imagery of violence, Spanish-American prison poetry, the cultural poetics of social protest, and United States Third World Hispanic poetry (the Puerto Rican and Nuyorican, as in "New York Puerto Rican," cultural aesthetic).

Agrarian Modernisation in Honduras
2002 0-7734-7283-5


American Peace and Justice Movement From the Early Twentieth Century to the Present
2016 1-4955-0421-2
This study gives us a different perspective of how 20th Century American history looks when we examine it through the lens of the organized peace movements that occurred, their history, leadership, organizational base and their long tradition of concern for social justice which has led to significant political and social reform in America.

An Ethnology of Four Non-Governmental Development Organizations Oxfam America, Grassroots International, Accion International, and Cultural Survival Inc
1998 0-7734-8361-6
A detailed study of the ways in which 4 non-governmental organizations are carving out new approaches to international development. Points to significant areas of reform and underscores the complexity and diversity of the development idea.

Bristol Riots of 1831 and Social Reform in Britain
1991 0-88946-224-0
Examines the riots in England of 1831, with special focus on the workers attempting to arrest the decline in wages and jobs through strikes and riotous behaviour. Clarifies specific social, economic, and political structures which created the possibility of such events.

Brookwood Labor College and the Struggle for Peace and Social Justice in America
1993 0-7734-9163-5
This is the only single volume history on Brookwood's contributions to peace and social reform in early twentieth-century America. It is based on extensive use of the Brookwood Labor College Papers and numerous other primary source collections. The college was led by America's most famous 20th-century pacifist, Abraham J. Muste. It trained not only capable labor organizers but also established the progressive organization, conference for Progressive Labor Action. The college's workers' education program stressed industrial justice and world peace as the key to a better society.

Business and Society in a Changing World Order
1993 0-7734-9267-4
This volume presents current theory and empirical research on ethical and social issues in business. The twelve chapters originally appeared among the papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the International Association for Business and Society in Leuven, Belgium. These papers were selected for their overall excellence, and many of them deal with international and European concerns.

C. L. Lewis and the Social Theory of Conceptualistic Pragmatism the Individual and the Good Social Order
1992 0-77349800-1
The purpose of this book is to provide a detailed examination of the social theory present within the ethics of C. L. Lewis. To date, no one has devoted sustained attention to Lewis' conception of the good social order. This volume utilizes previously unpublished manuscript materials. It presents his ideas from within the framework of his pragmatic philosophy as a whole, growing out of its positions on knowledge and value. Lewis' philosophy emerges from this study as a consistent and cohesive whole possessing a profoundly pragmatic core. This volume is a complement and supplement to the literature currently available on this important American pragmatist.

Carter Administration, Human Rights and the Agony of Cambodia
1993 0-7734-9367-0
The first specialized case study of the Carter administration's response to the tragic developments in Cambodia. Examines the complex interplay of factors that shaped American policy, including the inability to impose economic and diplomatic sanctions on the regime in Phnom Penh, a distaste felt by the American people for immersion into another Indochina "quagmire", and the administration's desire to move forward in its quest for normalization of relations with the People's Republic of China, which was the chief patron of the Khmer Rouge.

Catholic Concept of Genuine and Just Peace as a Basic Collective Human Right
1991 0-88946-239-9
The first systematic study on this subject in the world legal, philosophical, and political literature. Based on documentary materials and literature, this study is intended to serve as a practical handbook for university and college professors, students, journalists, and other persons involved professionally in the problem of peace and human rights.

Challenges of Women’s Activism and Human Rights in Africa
2000 0-7734-7885-X
This study contains essays written by activists and scholars from a wide range of fields who have conducted research or been involved on a grassroots level in an effort to advance women’s human rights.

Coffee Farmers Revolt in Southern Mexico in the 1980s and 1990s
2002 0-7734-7197-9
This study examines the struggles of small coffee farmers for control over their livelihoods in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico. The Zapatista rebellion of 1994, and this movement’s ongoing demands for justice focused the world’s attention on the plight of Mexico’s indigenous poor.

Council and Context in Leonardo Boff's Ecclesiology the Rebirth of the Church Among the Poor
1996 0-7734-8784-0
This study contains a broad analysis of Brazilian theologian Leonardo Boff's ecclesiology and shows its roots, both in the conciliar theology in the aftermath of Vatican II, in the tradition of Franciscan spirituality, and above all in the experiences of the Basic Christian Communities. In Brazil, the Basic Christian Communities have become a popular movement and a new way of being a church. Leonardo Boff interprets this experience as a rebirth of the church among the poor, as a critique of the traditional Church and a model for renewal. The volume analyzes the conflict between Boff and the Vatican over his book Church: Charism and Power, for which the Vatican's Congregation of Faith, under the leadership of Cardinal Ratzinger, punished Boff with a year of "silencio obsequioso".

Essays in Calvinist Social Theory: What Do Religion, Politics and Science Contribute to the Good Society
2016 1-4955-0498-0
This book collects essays that apply Calvinist political theology to a wide range of social issues. Calvinism’s impact upon society is so great that it has frequently been accused of being the cause of all the problems of modernity: the destruction of organic community, the domination of technology, the universalization of rationality, and a cost-benefit economic approach to all problems in life.

History of the American Peace Movement From Colonial Times to the Present
2008 0-7734-5092-0
Drawing upon a wide array of primary and secondary sources, this study explores the efforts of peace activists and organizations in their efforts to remake American society. More than an examination of the antiwar movement in United States history, the work is an extensive survey of the struggle for peace and justice. This book contains twenty-six black and white photographs.

Holy War
2007 0-7734-5548-5
Though the wise know that history will inevitably repeat itself, mankind keeps on making the same mistakes. It is never an easy task to write about war and religion, and Dr. Jacques G. Ruelland has managed to do so clearly and without prejudice. Through his exposé of the holy wars, this philosopher-historian traces a not-so-holy picture of civilization by analyzing the semantics of “sacredness” inherent to monotheistic religions. With the compassionate eye of the humanist, he helps us understand the origins of the justifications of wars waged in the name of the Almighty. Will we ever learn to eradicate this ancient practice? Not really, the historian believes, unless humanity can succeed in redefining the very notion of peace by assigning a new mission to science which would, ultimately, be dedicated to its real and ever-lasting pursuit.

Human Rights in Africa
2005 0-7734-6018-7
The last decades of the 20th century witnessed a massive wave of human rights activities, which was positively received by both the general public and the ruling elites of several societies. Many African governments recognized the human rights groups, although the latter were often placed under tight security surveillance, or incorporated into government-controlled structures at the expense of their original or autonomous roles. In political terms, this ghosting process comprises the usurpation of the modern democratic government and civil society by authoritative exclusionary policies. As occurred in many cases, the ghosting policies preempt the democratic context of popular activities by replacing them with state’s agenda to maintain only the authoritative structure and the security functioning of the state. This subservient relationship is clearly evident in the replacement of democratic regimes by military coup in the Sudan, as well as in most African nations, since independence to the present time. The hands of colonialism – and now globalization – are clearly reflected in human rights issues in Africa: governments known for inefficient, rude, and chaotic bureaucratic structures; selfish leaders who stir ethnic and religious conflict for personal gain; rapid, undirected urbanization; the exodus of intellectuals and experts; poor educational and health care systems; avaricious multinational corporations that control capital and technology pivotal to development; and staggering external debt. This book addresses the issues of human rights in Africa and confronts these challenges.

Human Rights of African Prisoners
2006 0-7734-6008-X
African countries suffer from a serious lack in civil rights and public freedoms more than industrial countries do. This lacking, by itself, explains the low levels of reform so far attained in the criminal justice system, in general, and prisons, in particular. In many cases, the state authorities recognized formally some of the internationally-recognized fundamental rights and public freedoms via constitutional or statutory law. Some of this recognition appeared in the prison regulations of a few African nations. The authority’s negation of the right to organize trade unions, professional associations, political parties, or non-governmental human rights organizations, nonetheless, violated grossly the human rights of citizens, especially the powerless groups of prisoners, women and juveniles. Added to the urgent need to fulfill the States Parties’ obligation to the United Nations’ humanitarian law and the standard minimum rules for the treatment of offenders, the African penal institutions must be reformed by democratic methods to allow the public at large, as well as policy makers, to implement the best ways possible to reform the criminal justice, crime prevention, and the prison inmates. A full implementation of such programs, however, would be possibly enforceable only within a political and administrative system of rule that would be highly committed to the human rights of citizens, regardless of their penal status, especially the right to life, the civil and political rights, and the other economic, social, and cultural rights.

Idea of Human Dignity in Korea
2007 0-7734-5324-5
This study explores the idea of human dignity in the Human Dignity Clause stipulated in the Constitution of South Korea, maintaining that to indigenize the imported idea of human dignity in Korean society, the idea must not only be translated into terms resonant with Korean culture but must also be implemented in the institutions of Korean society. This study will contribute toward an exploration of a more integrative understanding of the notion of human dignity as the basis for human rights, both in the Western conception, derived from Cicero’s formula, “dignitas hominis”, which was expanded in the Christian idea of the dignity of “God-like person-in-community”, as compared with similar kinds of discourse in Korean intellectual history, namely the idea of the supreme and relational worth of a “Heaven-like (han?l kat’?n) person-in-Han-community”. This work will contribute to an interdisciplinary understanding of the question of human dignity and should appeal to scholars in law, sociology, philosophy, ethics, theology, and comparative religious studies.

Irony of Apartheid the Struggle for National Independence of Afrikaner Calvinism Against British Imperialism
1981 0-88946-904-0


Jacques Maritain (1882-1973) Christian Democrat and the Quest for a New Commonwealth
1993 0-7734-9219-4
This study examines Maritain's definition of the common good and personal rights, and his analysis of Christian democracy. Also considers his endorsement of lay participation in Church and political affairs, his effort to expand human rights internationally, his insistence on social justice for members of the working class, and his promotion of religious and racial toleration. His vision for a new Christian commonwealth has gained increasing significance because of the current opportunity for restructuring European affairs.

Jesus and the Economic Questions of His Day
1986 0-88946-608-4
A study of the social conditions of first-century Palestine that explores the economic context of the historical Jesus, focusing on: issues of production and economic distribution; the "Jesus tradition" from an economic perspective; comparative material from biblical and Hellenistic authors; Jesus' occupation and the settings a carpenter might have encountered in finding work; the social contracts that could have resulted in Jesus' becoming a broker or bridge between social classes; and reflections on the economic values in the words and ministry of Jesus.

Jesus, Born of a Slave. The Social and Economic Origins of Jesus' Message
1998 0-7734-2440-7
This book is an exploration of Jesus' social origins and location in the society of his time and place. The hypothesis proposed is that Jesus was of slave status because he was born of a woman who was a slave. Contends that his career outside his household of origin was as a "freedman" with continuing obligations to his former owner. This hypothesis explains much that is otherwise obscure in the early Christian writings concerning Jesus, and facilitates reconstruction of his life and crucifixion. The book applies adaptations of methodologies used by the Jesus Seminars of the Westar Institute, of which the writer was a Fellow, to determine the historicity of teaching ascribed to Jesus. Table of Contents: Introduction; Jesus as a Slave - Historical Plausibility; In the Form of a Slave; Slave or Son? John's Gospel; Slave Experience in Jesus' Teaching; From Slave to Slave/Child of God - the Synoptic Gospels and the Acts; An Outlaw Slave and the Jewish Law - the Synoptic Gospels; A Fugitive Slave and His Community in the Synoptic Gospels; Condemnation and Death of an Upstart Slave; Family and Birth Traditions; Conclusions and Reflections; Bibliography and Index

Monotheism Applied to Social Issues in the Koran
2006 0-7734-6029-2
Note: As accommodation to widespread usage, the word Qur’an has been transliterated to Koran in the title. The precise transliteration, however, is Qur’an, and that usage is followed in this book.

This is a study of epistemological meaning of the Oneness of God and its implications on the worldview of unity of divine knowledge. On the basis of this cardinal epistemology the ontological deduction and evidential (ontic) description and explanation of unified world-systems are presented. The result is a new and challenging, path breaking work of analytical depth with extensive comparative study on the theme of unity of learning systems that are driven by the episteme of oneness of God as the premise of unity of divine knowledge explaining all world-systems. From this kind of original derivation of ideas many social and natural scientific questions are examined. Applications of such investigations and their analytical explanations in comparative views are suggested. The magnum opus will prove to be an indispensable companion of serious researchers and scholars in the area of original thinking on the epistemology of science and God.

Political Theory of Darwinism: Zoon Politikon and the Evolutionary Case for Social Democracy
2008 0-7734-5140-4
This study explores the theoretical impact the evolutionary sciences, in general, and holistic Darwinism in particular, have for any one political ideology that seeks to ground itself within a scientific view of human nature. The text demonstrates how several Marxian ideological principles are quite at odds with the view of human nature espoused by holistic Darwinism, broadly conceived. The author tentatively suggests that it is Social Democracy, as opposed to Marxism or liberal-democratic capitalism, which is the most adaptive political ideology in the twenty-first century.

Protection of Freedom of Expression in Africa: Problems of Application and Interpretation of Article 9 of the African Charter on Human and People’s Rights
2015 1-4955-0305-9
This groundbreaking research is concerned about the impact of African governments’ criminal penalties for defamatory statements and policies restricting the legitimate exercise of the right to freedom of expression. This book examines how the intolerant culture in African politics is used to deprive citizens and the media of these human rights.


Revolution by Reason and Other Essays
1997 0-7734-8429-9
This book examines the ideas of the late Sir Oswald Mosley: British politician and philosopher who became the youngest Member of Parliament and the only Minister ever to resign from office over the question of unemployment. Mosley spent a lifetime advocating systems based on enterprise, initiative and incentive as the best way to create wealth. But he always stressed the necessity for social controls to ensure the bounds of fairness were not breached, and he opposed large-scale international trade. This latter, he believed, led always to mass unemployment in the West as financiers switched investment to cheap-labor Third World countries in order to undercut the markets of advanced nations. For six decades Mosley argued for alternative policies. British Cabinet Minister Richard Crossman wrote: 'Mosley was spurned by Whitehall, Fleet Street . . . and Westminster simply and solely because he was right.' This book of Mosley's essays contains ideas that challenge the accepted wisdom of contemporary economic thought and form the basis of new systems for the future.

Social Capital and Institutions of Poverty Reduction in Africa
2012 0-7734-4086-0
There have been many books written about the issue of poverty in Africa. Most of them look at failed policies and criticize what does not work. This text looks at what does work, and outlines how to implement these effective policies. The question of credibility and strategic behaviors in institutions of poverty reduction is an area that needs to be addressed adequately and the author attempts to deal with it in a pragmatic way.

In the academic literature on designating effective institutions of poverty alleviation programs and policies in sub-Saharan Africa, it is rare to find direct assessments of the success of particular social policies and programs. In country after country, one is much more likely to see research on the failure of poverty reduction programs. Very often, contributors to the literature gravitate towards the presentation of raw numbers and figurers indicating that these policies and programs have failed and thus call for the discontinuation of such policies. Curiously, the most straightforward questions that many people outside of the development circle seem to want answered – such as, on what criteria are these conclusions reached, or what particular policies and programs have made a dent in poverty, are less popular in the discipline. This study focuses on the preconditions for success in poverty reduction programs. It proposes a framework which incorporates a mixture of social and political, as well as economic relationships, which these programs embody. Using evidence from original surveys of two micro-finance programs in Southern Nigeria, this policy evaluation study attempts from the standpoint of institutional and social capital theories to accomplish two goals: first, to fill the gaps in the literature by developing an evaluation framework emphasizing institutional design features and a strong network of relationships which lower costs for beneficiaries and providers; and second, to provide critical input for the policy task of designing effective institutions of poverty reduction programs.

Social Dimensions in the Novels of Barbara Pym, 1949-1963
2007 0-7734-5387-3
This study considers the six novels written by English novelist, Barbara Pym (1913-1980), between 1949 and 1963, which demonstrate the response of a specific class of people, represented by her heroines, to the dramatic social, cultural and demographic changes that took place in Britain at the time. Treating Pym’s 1950s novels as social-historical sources, this work attempts to analyze the way in which her portrayals of society, like those of so many other English writers, served both as a testimonies and critiques of the times in which she lived. The focal point of Pym’s novels was the interaction between the individual and the community: the Church, the parish or the work place. Therefore, this book attempts to reconstruct the social world of the female protagonists, moving from the public to the private domain, thereby opening up Pym’s novels to a new generation of readers.

Strategies to Overcome Oppression and Discrimination for Marginalized Groups
2001 0-7734-7334-3
Provides a comprehensive portrayal of the most vulnerable and disenfranchised groups in society. The book explores racial and ethnic minorities, children, gays and lesbians, women, people with disabilities, religious minorities, poverty, the elderly, and death and dying. The study integrates and dissects the complexity associated with understanding underlying causes and conditions that hinder populations at risk from attaining mainstream access. The text provides multiformity in strategies that can assist social workers in altering social outcomes, promoting a pivotal active emphasis on advocacy, empowerment, and social change.

Street Children in Sierra Leone Who Forgive Those Who Physically and Sexually Abuse Them: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis
2009 0-7734-4955-8
The study examines multidimensional issues relating to cruelty and forgiveness, specifically following the ten-year civil war in Sierra Leone. It discussed some experiences of children in Biblical times, and connections between the work of street children personnel and practical theology.

Sudan Law and International Human Rights Norms
2002 0-7734-6991-5


Tension Between Women's Rights and Religions
2006 0-7734-5579-5
This study considers the extent to which localizing the integration of rights, cultures and religion: 1) challenges the universality and secularization of the rights discourse and practice globally; 2) bridges the disparity between the rhetoric and implementation of women’s-human rights in global and local contexts; and 3) embodies an Asian-Malaysian feminist standpoint epistemology that has the potential to reconcile the impasse of universal versus cultural relativism of rights. The narratives of 25 women and two men interviewed as faith-rights-based activists encapsulate ways of knowing and doing women’s-human rights in epitomizing what it means to radicalize rights and religion in spiritualizing politics and practicing spirituality. This study shows how critical relativism as a moral and political imperative more effectively advances and not impedes women’s rights as human rights within local and global contexts. In doing so, this study offers a solution to the impasse of universalism versus relativism of rights in the rhetoric and practice of women’s human rights. This multi-disciplinary study will be insightful to scholars in Women’s Studies, Religious Studies and Development Studies. It would also appeal to women’s human rights activists in serving as an advocacy tool in weaving rights and religions within local and global contexts.

Terrorism, Justice, and Social Values
1991 0-88946-739-0
Papers selected from the International Philosophy Conference at Guadalajara, Mexico, and others sponsored by the North American Society for Social Philosophy present issues related to terrorism and social values, for class reading and discussion. Social Philosophy Today No. 4

Theological and Ethics Writings of Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904)
2002 0-7734-7180-4
Frances Power Cobbe is best known to scholars of 19th century Britain for her participation in such causes as workhouse reform, education for poor children, women’s rights, and anti-vivisection. Her social activism was founded on strongly-held religious beliefs and she wrote prolifically on religion for fifty years. This book examines Cobbe’s writings on religion, ethics, and morality, and traces the development of her thought over the course of her life. Cobbe’s Theism, critique of Christianity, and her interest in the tension between science and religion moved her from the safe Victorian female realm of devotion and piety to the contentious male realm of philosophical exchange. Her voluminous writings offer a valuable case study for the intersection of women’s history, the history of religion, and intellectual history.

War, Terrorism, Genocide, and the Quest for Peace - Contemporary Problems in Political Ethics
2003 0-7734-6556-1
This collection brings together a number of papers that throw light on and engage timely and important ethical issues facing humanity in the 21st century: war, revolution, political assassination, terrorism and counter-terrorism, humanitarian military intervention, nuclear deterrence and the Missile Defense Shield; genocide, and the quest for peace. In addition to the ethical issues considered, the study also critically examines pertinent international legal aspects of these issues

Washington Gladden as a Preacher of the Social Gospel, 1882-1918
2003 0-7734-6867-6
This is a study of pulpit work of the ‘Father of the American Social Gospel’ during his most influential years, his Columbus pastorate. It is based on primary sources – Gladden manuscripts and correspondence. It places the preacher in the context of Congregationalism, his times, and his immediate situation.