Kaye, Bradley Books

Dr. Bradley Kaye holds a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Binghamton University’s Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture Program. He taught Philosophy and Sociology at Broome Community College in Binghamton, New York for four years.

Critical Madness Theory: A Way of Interpreting Irrational Behavior as Political Action
2012 0-7734-4049-6
In philosophical and economic traditions it is common place to discuss agency as rational and self-interested. This book examines how therapeutic practices in bi-polar support groups actually contradict this baseline presupposition. Can irrational people whose behavior does not correspond to their own personal interests be viewed as political agents, and this book argues yes. How does the madness inherent in mental illness factor into political organizing in radical groups like anarchists, and how can a new existential-phenomenological philosophy, which Dr. Kaye creates, help us to better understand grassroots organizing. The chapters progress from a discussion of transversality as the panacea to disciplinary power, which opens up agency, on to a discussion of existential-phenomenological intentions. It then moves to advocacy for this new philosophical system. It finishes in the final chapter on the art of living. The main goal of the book is to advocate for a new, postmodern view of political agency by looking at how it relates to previous incarnations of modernism from continental philosophy from Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, onwards to contemporary postmodern theories by thinkers ranging from Deleuze, Foucault, Derrida, Lyotard, and Butler.

This book was an attempt to create a totally unique philosophy utilizing continental thinking. The goal was to wed postmodernism, which has fallen out of fashion due to what constitutes a total misunderstanding of its main concepts, with canonical philosophers in the continental tradition, namely Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx, and Heidegger. The philosophers whose work I utilized as exemplary of postmodernism, and mind you, they sometimes dismiss this classification due to its misuse, are Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Jacques Derrida, Judith Butler, and Felix Guattari. The overarching concern of this book is to view irrationalism in their work as a method of political agency, which I backed up with field observations in local bi-polar support groups in the Binghamton area. The point was to fuse continental philosophy with real therapeutic praxis, which culminates in an aesthetic conception of living, and ethics, which I view as ongoing processes that change as times change. The theme that runs through the whole book is a certain material-mortal approach to death whereby the extremely miniscule time one has to live, if examined authentically, compels the subject to take political and ethical actions, precisely because life will appear precious, and that this approach to death has a radically therapeutic effect on some people.