Ederer, Rupert J. Books

Dr. Rupert J. Ederer is Professor Emeritus of economics from State University of New York College at Buffalo. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from St. Louis University.

Lehrbuch Der National Ökonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2003 0-7734-6680-0
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-7133-2
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-7135-9
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-6958-3
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-6960-5
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-6916-8
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-6914-1
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics
2002 0-7734-6815-3
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.



Lehrbuch Der NationalÖkonomie / Teaching Guide to Economics V5 Bk 1
2003 0-7734-6678-9
This is the first English translation of the works of Heinrich Pesch, SJ (1854-1926). Pesch, a German Jesuit scholar and economist, wrote the longest, most exhaustive economics text ever written, one that deserves to be regarded as a kind of Summa Economica. The five-volume Lehrbuch der Nationalökonomie examines all serious economic thinking up until Pesch’s time, culling what was deficient, retaining what was worthwhile, and filling in what its author perceived to be lacking. The result was a design for an economic system that is opposed to both classically liberal capitalism and state socialism, based instead on Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophical premises. Pesch developed many of the basic principles which emerged in the social encyclicals of the Catholic Church.

Volume One: Foundations for Economic Life
Pesch establishes human work as the principle source of economic wealth and prosperity. He presents three principal pillars of social order: the family, the state, and the institution (private ownership). There follows a refutation of the individualistic and collectivistic social philosophies as underlying free market capitalism and socialism respectively. In place of these, Pesch presents for the first time solidarism based on mutual support and interdependence among workers and owners. Concludes with a distinctive methodological preparation for his analysis of the economy.

Volume Two: Economic Systems and the Nature and Dispositional Causes of the Wealth of a Nation
Presents the preceding and alternative economic systems (mercantilism, physiocracy, smith’s individualistic system, and socialism) in contract with Pesch’s own proposed system: the Solidaristic System of Human Work. There follows an analysis of national wealth and its two principle dispositional bases, natural resources and population. In refuting the Malthusian analysis, Pesch provides the maxim that if we see to the quality of the population, there need be no concern about its quantity.

Volume Three: The Active Causes in the Ongoing Economic Process
Examines what he designates as the active elements at work in the economic process, as opposed to the dispositional ones treated in Vol. 2. Examines individual initiative, business enterprise, labor unions, cooperatives, cartels, and the role of state and local governments.

Volume Four: The Satisfaction of a Nation’s Wants as the Purpose of the National Economy and Production
Book One:

Institutes the principles that the economy is designed for satisfying human temporal wants, not for profits of the enrichment of the few. Chapter headings include: A nation’s wants and satisfying those wants; Three particular “want phenomena” – luxury, fashion, alcoholism; Systems and principles for satisfying wants; Regulating factors; Production and the factors of production.
Book Two:
Chapter headings: Material means of production; Organization of production; Branches of production; Collector Economy; Primitive production; Industrial system; Agricultural state and Industrial state.

Volume Five: General Economics
Covers the second and third stages in the economic process: exchange and income determination. Deals with money and the banking system, foreign exchange, and entrepreneurial income. It concludes with what Pesch designates as distortions in the economic process, economic crises, and the strike and lockout.
Book One:
Chapter headings: The Exchange process; Exchange in general; Economic value, exchange value, costs and value; Price; ‘Objective’ and ‘subjective’ values and price theories; the Idea of the just price; Rising price and increased living costs; Money and the monetary system; Origins and functions of money; Coin; Money- the concept, money substitutes, money required; Monetary standards and systems; Value of money and currency; Historical development of monetary standards; New currency problems; Credit transactions in general in the economy; Trade and Transportation; Trade in general; Trade and merchandise; Principle of freedom as applied to trade; Commerce in money and credit, the banking system; Kinds of banking business; Foreign exchange transactions and exchange ratios before the World War; Exchange rate problems and the inflationary situation in the post-war period; Exchange system; Transportation system
Book Two:
Chapter headings: General theory of income and wealth determination; Income of the worker; Wage theories; Just wage as the economically correct wage; Wage problem in practice; Entrepreneurial income; Source and justification of entrepreneurial income; Land rent and agricultural entrepreneurial income; Pure rental income; interest on loans; Rentals and leases; Providing for the poor, and the insurance system; Disturbances in the economic process; Crises; Strikes and lockouts

Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order Book 1: The Philosophical Roots of Economic Liberalism
2000 0-7734-7798-5
This book is the first translation into English of Der moderne Socialismus by the German Jesuit scholar Heinrich Pesch (1854-1926). That book appeared in 1990 as the last in a series of five works by Pesch under the overall title Liberalismus, Socialismus und christliche Gesellschaftsordnung (Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order). These century-old works have much relevancy in view of the significant revival during the post-World War II era of the free market concept.

Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order Book 2
2000 0-7734-7594-X
These books are the first translation into English of Liberalismus, Socialismus und christliche Gesellschaftsordnung (Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order) by the German Jesuit scholar Heinrich Pesch (1854-1926). These century-old works have much relevancy in view of the significant revival during the post-World War II era of the free market concept.

Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order Book 3: Private Property as a Social Institution
2001 0-7734-7587-7
This book is the first translation into English of Der moderne Socialismus by the German Jesuit scholar Heinrich Pesch (1854-1926). That book appeared in 1990 as the last in a series of five works by Pesch under the overall title Liberalismus, Socialismus und christliche Gesellschaftsordnung (Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order). These century-old works have much relevancy in view of the significant revival during the post-World War II era of the free market concept.

Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order Book 4: The Christian Concept of the State
2001 0-7734-7482-X
This book is the first translation into English of Der moderne Socialismus by the German Jesuit scholar Heinrich Pesch (1854-1926). That book appeared in 1990 as the last in a series of five works by Pesch under the overall title Liberalismus, Socialismus und christliche Gesellschaftsordnung (Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order). These century-old works have much relevancy in view of the significant revival during the post-World War II era of the free market concept.

Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order Book 5
2006 0-7734-5782-8
This book is the first translation into English of i>Liberalismus, Socialismus und christliche Gesellschaftsordnung (Liberalism, Socialism and Christian Social Order) by the German Jesuit scholar Heinrich Pesch (1854-1926). These century-old works have much relevancy in view of the significant revival during the post-World War II era of the free market concept.