Mahmoud, Mahgoub El-Tigani Books

Mahgoub El-Tigani Mahmoud is a Professor of Sociology at Tennessee State University, as well as former Director of the University’s Office of International Relations and Programs. He received his PhD in Sociology from Brown University. A former adviser of the Ministry of Social Affairs of the Democratic Government of Sudan, he worked at the African Center for Democracy and Human Rights’ Studies of the Gambia. Professor Mahmoud is a founder and has been repeatedly elected president of the Sudan Human Rights Organization-Cairo and is Editor-in-Chief of the bilingual Sudanese human Rights Quarterly. His published works include many chapters in many volumes on human rights, Africa, and the Sudan. He writes in both English and Arabic. His most recent publications include State and Religion in Sudan and The Sources of Islamic Jurisprudence – Justice and Law in Islam, and the Arabic translations of William Adams’ Nubia - Corridor to Africa and Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban’s Islamic Law and Society in Sudan. Dr. Mahmoud is a Multiple Year Honoree in the 9th Edition of Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers, added to his inclusion in Who’s Who in America (2012).

Criminology and Penology in Islamic Jurisprudence
2015 1-4955-0273-2
This work examines major aspects of criminology and penology in Islamic jurisprudence in the light of the Shari’a classical heritage. Based on the mental construction and spiritual functions of the Muslim classical principles for crime prevention and the treatment of offenders, legal provisions are analyzed in comparison with international human rights norms, as well as American constitutional law, the Saudi and Egyptian criminal procedures, and the Sudanese and Emirates’ penal legislations.

Human Rights in Africa
2005 0-7734-6018-7
The last decades of the 20th century witnessed a massive wave of human rights activities, which was positively received by both the general public and the ruling elites of several societies. Many African governments recognized the human rights groups, although the latter were often placed under tight security surveillance, or incorporated into government-controlled structures at the expense of their original or autonomous roles. In political terms, this ghosting process comprises the usurpation of the modern democratic government and civil society by authoritative exclusionary policies. As occurred in many cases, the ghosting policies preempt the democratic context of popular activities by replacing them with state’s agenda to maintain only the authoritative structure and the security functioning of the state. This subservient relationship is clearly evident in the replacement of democratic regimes by military coup in the Sudan, as well as in most African nations, since independence to the present time. The hands of colonialism – and now globalization – are clearly reflected in human rights issues in Africa: governments known for inefficient, rude, and chaotic bureaucratic structures; selfish leaders who stir ethnic and religious conflict for personal gain; rapid, undirected urbanization; the exodus of intellectuals and experts; poor educational and health care systems; avaricious multinational corporations that control capital and technology pivotal to development; and staggering external debt. This book addresses the issues of human rights in Africa and confronts these challenges.

Human Rights of African Prisoners
2006 0-7734-6008-X
African countries suffer from a serious lack in civil rights and public freedoms more than industrial countries do. This lacking, by itself, explains the low levels of reform so far attained in the criminal justice system, in general, and prisons, in particular. In many cases, the state authorities recognized formally some of the internationally-recognized fundamental rights and public freedoms via constitutional or statutory law. Some of this recognition appeared in the prison regulations of a few African nations. The authority’s negation of the right to organize trade unions, professional associations, political parties, or non-governmental human rights organizations, nonetheless, violated grossly the human rights of citizens, especially the powerless groups of prisoners, women and juveniles. Added to the urgent need to fulfill the States Parties’ obligation to the United Nations’ humanitarian law and the standard minimum rules for the treatment of offenders, the African penal institutions must be reformed by democratic methods to allow the public at large, as well as policy makers, to implement the best ways possible to reform the criminal justice, crime prevention, and the prison inmates. A full implementation of such programs, however, would be possibly enforceable only within a political and administrative system of rule that would be highly committed to the human rights of citizens, regardless of their penal status, especially the right to life, the civil and political rights, and the other economic, social, and cultural rights.

Linkages Among African and African-american Thinkers
2008 0-7734-5207-9
This work examines the intellectual origins and linkages of African and African-American thought. The author highlights critical aspects of the continuity, unity and vitality of Black Thought which have stimulated scientific social research and policy-making in the African and African-American spheres of knowledge and political concerns.

Sources of Islamic Jurisprudence: Justice and Law in Islam
2013 0-7734-4481-5
Islamic jurisprudence and its sources are brilliantly explained in this compelling and instructive book. The reader comes away with a clearer sense of the meaning of Shari’a principles and jihad, and how social justice theories translate into practical actions and practical reality in today’s global community.

State and Religion in the Sudan
2003 0-7734-6748-3
The issues analyzed in this book are top agenda in the Muslim world. This book shows with unprecedented sociological analysis the underlying agreements among several Sudanese thinkers, including the Islamic thinker Mahmoud Mohamed Taha, the socialist leader ‘Abd al-Khaliq Mahgoub, the liberal politician al-Sadiq al Mahdi, the women’s-rights activist Fatima Ahmed Ibrahim, and the fundamentalist writer Hassan al-Turabi, in spite of irreconcilable differences in ideological commitments or political agenda. These explorations should make this work an indispensable volume of thought for politicians and policy makers, students of religion and government, and researchers of contemporary theory and applied sociology.

Sudan Law and International Human Rights Norms
2002 0-7734-6991-5