Subject Area: Irish & Ireland: All Subjects

Adaptations of Roman Epic in Medieval Ireland Three Studies in the Interplay of Erudition and Oral Tradition
1998 0-7734-8285-7
This is the first book-length project to examine, side by side and through close textual analysis, the medieval adaptations of Vergil, Lucan, and Statius from Latin into Irish Gaelic. By juxtaposing the Imtheachta Aeniasa, In Cath Catharda, and the Togail na Tebe more closely to the Aeneid, the Bellum Civile, and the Thevaid than has ever been done, Harris is able to detect patterns of nuance in all three adaptations which go beyond the obviously historical generalizations about times and customs.

Alphabetical Listing of Word, Name, and Place in Northern Ireland and the Living Language of Conflict
2000 0-7734-7711-X
This is a scholarly, detailed, comprehensive complication, in alphabetical form, of all matters relating to the long and violent conflict in Northern Ireland. It contains detailed lists and references to all important events, political, social and violence-related: these include lists and descriptions of all political parties; all paramilitary groups; all the major bombings, killings and atrocities; along with all political developments, initiatives and historical moments. Each entry is intended to be precise and factual, to give all necessary details while eschewing judgments or personal views. It places emphasis on the vocabulary generated by the conflict, with reference to terms of abuse, slang expressions, nicknames, and new uses of old words. It is carefully organized so that cross-referencing and inter-subject relationships can be extracted and correlated.

Analysis of Hiberno-English in the Early Novels of Patrick Macgill
2006 0-7734-5808-5
This study is a linguistic analysis of two novels by the early twentieth-century Donegal writer Patrick MacGill. Both Children of the Dead End and The Rat Pit enjoyed great popularity in England and the USA, though not in Ireland itself, where they were not so well received. From a linguistic point of view, these two novels form a particularly interesting source of data for the study of the dialectal variety known as Hiberno-English (or Irish English), as the author purports to give an accurate portrayal of the types of English spoken in Donegal in a period of ongoing bilingualism and language shift from Irish to English.

Chapter 1 contains an introduction to the author’s biographical, literary and linguistic background. This is supplemented with a description of the English of Donegal. Chapter 2 is devoted to an analysis of the syntax and grammar of the two novels, such as the use of the definite article, the reflexive pronoun or the cleft sentence, among other features. Chapter 3 pays special attention to the vocabulary found in the novels. The grammatical, syntactic and lexical features analyzed here are heavily influenced by the Irish language and bear striking similarities with the type of structures produced by second language learners, which allows us to look at this variety of English in a different light. This work will appeal to scholars interested in Irish English, languages in contact and Irish Literature in English.

Andrew P. Wilson and the Early Irish and Scottish National Theatres, 1911-1950
2008 0-7734-5084-X
This work examines the contributions to two British theatre traditions of Andrew P. Wilson and the birth pangs accompanying the idea and the reality of a national theatre in Ireland and Scotland. The only book of its kind, it is a critical biography of one man’s work and a call to recognize important persons whom scholars have deemed as canonically dispensable.

Anglo-Irish Theatre and the Formation of a Nationalist Political Culture Between 1890 and 1930
2003 0-7734-6811-0
The period between the fall of Parnell in 1890 and the Easter Rising 1916, is one of the most complex in Irish history due to the close interrelation between politics and culture. Literature played a significant role in the gestation of the modern Irish nation, and the Anglo-Irish Literary Movement led by Lady Gregory, William Butler Yeats, and John Millington Synge became repeatedly involved in the political struggle. This book investigates the intricate relationship between writers and politics and their responsibility for the emerging radicalization of nationalism toward 1916. It also considers the question of the writers’ own involvement in the nationalist cause, and focuses on the interplay of politics, nationalism and the very human element of personality and timing in order to elucidate the mechanics of national mobilization before 1916.

Bilingual Education in Pre-Independent Irish-Speaking Ireland, 1800-1922
2006 0-7734-5636-8
In recent years, there has been a great interest worldwide in the development of bilingual education policies, as well as interest in associated research and innovations reported in the academic literature. Yet, bilingual education is not a recent phenomenon. Rather, it has a rich and diverse history. This book is offered as a contribution to a small but growing corpus of studies in the field. It is an historical account of the Bilingual Program of Instruction introduced in selected primary schools in Irish-speaking districts in Ireland between 1904 and 1922. The general historical context is outlined, and the nature of the Program, the extent to which it was disseminated, and the inadequacies of teacher training for its implementation are considered. Teacher development of bilingual methods is also examined. This is followed by an exposition on the broad pattern of responses to the Bilingual Program in the various Irish-speaking districts around the country, and an overview of developments leading up to the phasing out of the Program shortly after the establishment of the Irish free state in 1922. The book concludes with an overview of the major milestones in language education policy in Ireland in the post-independence years.

Biographical Encyclopedia of Medical Travel Authors: Ireland
2010 0-7734-3689-8
The collection is a wide-ranging reference guide. The six volumes are made up of one-paragraph biographies of medical travel authors drawn from all peoples and regions of the world. The authors are included because they have published a book of travel or have left significant material of book potential. Some space is given to travellers from abroad into the region represented by the volume.

Biography of the Irish God of the Sea From the Voyage of Bran (700 A. D.) to Finnegans Wake (1939): The Waves of Manannán
2004 0-7734-6382-8
This book is one of the few works that examines the roles of Manannán mac Lir, one of the most fascinating characters in Irish literature, in Gaelic, Manx and Anglo-Irish literature. The author brings together and examines the various roles Manannán plays in Irish and Anglo-Irish literature and determines both the consistency and diversity in the ways he is portrayed in these stories. These representations are presented as a literary “biography: for Manannán with emphasis on both the invariant aspects of his character and his impressive adaptability. In addition, the author also demonstrates and seeks to explain the popularity and incredible longevity of Manannán in Irish and Anglo-Irish literature from Immram Brain to Finnegan’s Wake.

Brendan Kennelly's Literary Works: the Developing Art of an Irish Writer, 1959-2000
2005 0-7734-5978-2
This book provides a comprehensive overview of the work of one of Ireland’s most prominent yet also critically neglected writers, Brendan Kennelly. While covering his output from 1959 onwards, the chosen approach is systematic rather than chronological. Shedding light on Kennelly’s poems, novels, and plays from different angles – “History and Politics”, “Spaces/Places: Country, City, Nature”, “Religion and Ethics” as well as “Gender and Sexuality” – Kennelly’s development is traced from his neo-Romanticist beginnings to a critical and highly provocative postmodern stance, above all in the later long poems: Cromwell, The Book of Judas, and Poetry My Arse. While this study is certainly valuable as an introduction for the general reader, combining in-depth analyses of the most important works with general contextual information, the embedding of these analyses within a larger theoretical framework (including deconstruction, postcolonial theory, or gender studies) will also challenge the more experienced Kennellyan. Brendan Kennelly is a painstaking critic of today’s complacencies, inhibitions and violence, a scrupulous analyst of society, and an uncompromising reader of the past who, nevertheless, remains self-critical throughout.

Brian Moore and the Meaning of the Past
2007 0-7734-5403-9
Critics of the Irish novelist, Brian Moore (1921-1999), have largely concentrated upon his use of faith and realism; although such examinations have illuminated his novels in intriguing and useful ways, much has been neglected by viewing his work solely from these perspectives. The sheer variety of Moore’s work discourages a single viewpoint because his oeuvre refuses classification, be that through narrative mode, his use of religion, or his varied use of setting. The approach of this book, which is the first of its kind, examines how history influences Moore’s texts as well as how it codifies his individual characters. By the end of his career, Brian Moore was rewriting history in order to create new narratives that explored colonialism, identity, religion, and the intersection between differing interpretations of the past. In all of these cases, a careful examination of history opens up the texts to new readings. This critical analysis examines Brian Moore as a writer who was heavily invested in the representation and the meaning of the past.

Case Study of Ireland and Galicia’s Parallel Paths to Nationhood
2004 0-7734-6237-6
This is an important original study that contributes new knowledge in the field of Celtic Studies as it offers serious consideration to the connections between Ireland and Galicia Dr. White traces the connections between these two Celtic lands through literature, history, mythology and science. White shows that Ireland and Galicia had parallel cultural and national awakenings in the nineteenth century. She demonstrates how these awakenings had roots in the native language movements and how that connection between language and cultural identity eventually led to national identity and political action towards autonomy. Dr. White specifically recounts the role played by elite members such as W.B. Yeats and Vicente Risco and associations such as the Gaelic League and as Irmandades da Fala. White also discusses the role of language as socio-political tool in the works of nineteenth-century national poets, Thomas Moore for Ireland and Rosalía de Castro for Galicia and their twentieth-century counterparts: Seamus Heaney and Celso Emilio Ferreiro. Finally, Dr. White introduces a new term peripheral colonialism to describe Ireland and Galicia’s condition as unofficial colonies of England and Spain respectively.

Celtic Literature of Defeat. An Extraordinary Assortment of Irregularities
1993 0-7734-9332-8
This book attempts to define a genre, called the literature of defeat, in a context made up of its various historical geneses, characteristic style, individual forms, sustaining symbols and motifs, prevailing themes, and relationship to the mainstream. Its existence seems dependent first of all upon the historical circumstance of a military defeat or civil violation of a culture, and the withdrawal of that culture into itself as a way of life, a set of attitudes, a manner of visualizing things. This study also maintains that the literature of defeat is the chief mode of the insular Celts, who never suffered their defeat and occupation by the English gracefully; but carried with them into their secret places their icons and signs and sacraments, all of which shaped their visual art and writings. This book is an account of the writings, past and present, in Wales and Ireland.

Census of Ireland 1821-1911 General Reports and Extracts: Volume 1
1998 0-7734-8453-1
Volume 1: Introduction. A Great Statistical Operation: The Census in Victorian Ireland 1821-1911 Census of Ireland: 1821 (1823) Census of Ireland: 1831 (1833) Census of Ireland: 1841 (1843) Wilde, W. R. Report Upon the Tables of Death (1843) Census of Ireland: 1851 (1853) Volume 2: Introduction. A Great Statistical Operation: The Census in Victorian Ireland 1821-1911 Census of Ireland: 1861 (1864) Census of Ireland: 1871 (1876) Census of Ireland: 1881 (1882) Volume 3: Census of Ireland: 1891 (1892) Census of Ireland: 1901 (1901) Census of Ireland: 1911 (1913)

Census of Ireland 1821-1911 General Reports and Extracts: Volume 2
1998 0-7734-8455-8


Census of Ireland 1821-1911 General Reports and Extracts: Volume 3
1998 0-7734-8300-4
Volume 1: Introduction. A Great Statistical Operation: The Census in Victorian Ireland 1821-1911 Census of Ireland: 1821 (1823) Census of Ireland: 1831 (1833) Census of Ireland: 1841 (1843) Wilde, W. R. Report Upon the Tables of Death (1843) Census of Ireland: 1851 (1853) Volume 2: Introduction. A Great Statistical Operation: The Census in Victorian Ireland 1821-1911 Census of Ireland: 1861 (1864) Census of Ireland: 1871 (1876) Census of Ireland: 1881 (1882) Volume 3: Census of Ireland: 1891 (1892) Census of Ireland: 1901 (1901) Census of Ireland: 1911 (1913)

Child as Emblem of the Nation in Twentieth-Century Irish Literature
2006 0-7734-5614-7
The Irish literary child has its nascence in earliest Celtic mythology and flourishes as an emblem of the Irish nation throughout Irish literature to the present day. This book concentrates on the development of this symbolic figure in twentieth century Irish poetry and prose and juxtaposes the figure of the literary child at any given point in the century with political and social conditions of Ireland at the time. The result of this pairing over the course of the century is the revelation of the paradigmatic nature of the child in Irish literature. As the nature of and challenges before this child evolve in literature, so does the nation of Ireland.

Clinical Psychology in Ireland Volume Two: Empirical Studies of Problems and Treatment Processes in Adults
2001 0-7734-7339-4
Clinical Psychology in Ireland is a series of books edited by Alan Carr, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at University College Dublin. Volumes within the series focus predominantly of empirical research conducted by clinical psychologists within an Irish context along with some papers on theory and practice. The first volume in the series is concerned with empirical studies of professional practice and includes surveys of the work practices, roles and stresses of Irish clinical psychologists. The second volume is a collection of empirical studies of problems and treatment processes in adult populations with psychological difficulties. Empirical studies of problems and treatment process in the field of child and adolescent mental health is the central theme of the third volume in this series. The fourth volume contains accounts of theory, practice and research in the family therapy written by Irish psychologists who have specialized in this particular therapeutic approach. Future volumes in the series will focus on these and other themes including child protection, juvenile offending and the prevention of childhood psychological problems. This ensemble (Volume 2) represents the very best of traditions in clinical psychology: That of the experimental investigation of psychological problems and explanatory theories which underpin them. This is the scientist-practitioner approach in action. This collection of reviews and empirical studies will be of use to all practicing adult mental health professionals. It will be of particular value to trainee clinical psychologists and other mental health practitioners in training. In the present era of evidence-based practice, what better bed-time reading? Bon appetit! Professor Michael Wang, Director of clinical psychology training, University of Hull.

Critical Biography of Lady Jane Wilde, 1821 - 1896 Irish Revolutionist, Humanist, Scholar and Poet
2002 0-7734-7263-0
The focus of this study is upon a progressive women whose broad erudition allowed her to write on a great variety of subjects. Her own life as a revolutionist and writer, and her writings about women will interest those in women’s studies. As an Irish nationalist in a movement that had considerable influence on subsequent nationalist leaders like Arthur Griffin, her views in her revolutionary poems and articles are still pertinent.

Critical Study of Sean O’ Faolain’s Life and Work
2001 0-7734-7410-2
This first full-length critical study of Sean O’Faolain’s oeuvre in 25 years explores this neglected Irish writer and puts his achievement in historical and political context. Arndt’s theoretical framework uses primarily Foucault and Fanon. Though O’Faolain tried to convey a picture of himself as an internationalist, he also remained emotionally attached to his Irish roots. This study proposes that these fundamental points lie at the heart his often contradictory arguments on contemporary Irish issues such as the Gaelic heritage, Catholicism, nationalism, and the Anglo-Irish and English colonial presence in Ireland. Essential reading for those interested in cultural, political, historical and literary aspects of 20th century Ireland.

Current Debate About the Irish Literary Canon
2006 0-7734-5971-5
This collection of essays examines Ireland’s literary canon in light of The Field Day Anthology of Irish Writing and Irish identity at the turn of the century, contextualizing its readings within the understanding that The Field Day Anthology has crystallized discussions of literary value, canonicity, political agency and Irish identity because of its agenda and the ensuing controversy surrounding its publication. Yet, while The Field Day Anthology constitutes the occasion for writing, the collection also moves beyond it to suggest new models for reading and evaluating Irish literature and identity in the new century. The essays in the collection examine the canonical status of writers such as Joyce, Yeats and Beckett; how postcolonial theory and criticism have reshaped the boundaries of Irish studies; and how women’s writing has challenged canonicity as a concept.

Depiction of Irish Masculinity in Neo-Expressionist Painting
2011 0-7734-3733-9
This study examines Irish artistic production and generates a debate on how the painters' collective artistic intentions transcend national borders to engage with the wider debate concerning male subjectivity and masculine representation within a sexual political arena where patriarchal attitudes and assumptions are questioned.

Includes 40 color reproductions of paintings by Brian Maguire, Patrick Graham, and Michael Mulcahy.

Development of the Irish Labour Party's European Policy
2006 0-7734-5729-1
The story of the Irish Labour Party’s transition from opposition to support for European integration is a fascinating one. Labour has gone from leading the campaign against membership in 1972 to leading the campaign to rescue the Treaty of Nice in 2002, a thirty-year political odyssey which sheds light on a number of important political questions. This book explores the key role played by political parties in connecting citizens to the European Union (EU), and as the EU tries to strengthen its democratic credentials, that role is going to become even more important.

It explores the complex relationship between Ireland and the EU, as the country moves from being outside the EU to one of its strongest supporters to surprisingly rejecting the Treaty of Nice. It examines the links between social democracy and European integration, as the Labour Party’s transition mirrors the path taken by many other European social democratic parties.

Above all, the book provides a comprehensive analysis of the Labour Party, examining its role in government and in opposition, assessing it at national and European levels, and evaluating its principles and policies. The result is an engaging and insightful treatment of an important and thought-provoking topic.



Eavan Boland's Evolution as an Irish Woman Poet
2007 0-7734-5383-0
This study re-evaluates Boland’s work in the dual light of two important ideologies within modern Irish writing: feminism and postcolonialism. Its main objective is to analyze Boland’s evolution as an Irish woman poet in her attempt to overcome marginalization as a postcolonial gendered subject. By bringing together postcolonial and feminist theorizations of identity, this study demonstrates how Boland gradually undermines the (presumably authentic) representations of ‘woman’ and ‘nation’ she has inherited. By describing ‘Irishness’ and ‘womanhood’ in terms of fluidity and hybridity, Boland’s poetry exposes the constructedness of identity itself and allows the speaker to find a place freed from authoritative ideologies. In so doing, Boland manages to present a background where new decolonizing identities can emerge. In other words, it is here where she finds her way out as an outsider within an outsider’s culture.

Education Work of Richard Lovell Edgeworth, Irish Educator and Inventor, 1744-1817
2003 0-7734-6841-2


Encyclopedia of Irish Schools, 1500-1800
1995 0-7734-9050-7
This encyclopedia is a research tool for both specialists in Anglo-Irish culture and the generalists who would like to know something about the variety of schools that existed in Ireland before the installation of the Irish state schools in the nineteenth century. This volume's importance lies in its compilation of hard-to-find materials that are in archives or in Irish regional or religious oriented journals. For example, little has been written about the suppressed report of 1791 concerning the endowed schools of Ireland, or about the Irish House of Lords' Census of Catholic schools, "masshouses" and monasteries. There is a richness of material that awaits future researchers in Irish education.

English Images of the Irish 1570-1620
2002 0-7734-7019-0


Experience of Irish Migrants to Glasgow, Scotland, 1863-1891
2007 0-7734-5515-9
This book analyses how the Irish-born, and their offspring, in one nineteenth century British city came to define and understand their Irishness through political action. It proposes that the organisation and representation of Irishness in Glasgow (and, by extension, Scotland) eventually led to a secular, even radical, ‘fusion’ of loyalties, from the time of Daniel O’Connell onwards which allowed Protestants such as John Ferguson an entry into nationalist debate. Ferguson, despite the competing claims of the Catholic Church and the drink trade, not only successfully created a Home Rule movement in the 1870s but also, in the long term, crucially fused loyalty to organised labour with his representation of Irish political identity. Based on extensive research, this work aims to give the non-Scottish reader a fuller idea of the origins of the Glasgow Irish, emphasising the great importance of Ulster connections, and to contribute to the ongoing debate on the nature of Irish political identity in urban Britain and USA.

Explaining the Irish Welfare State: An Historical, Comparative, and Political Analysis
2005 0-7734-6036-5
This book provides a comprehensive overview of the Irish welfare system in comparative perspective. It examines key issues which have shaped the development of the Irish welfare state including the impact of Ireland’s post-colonial position, the role of globalisation and Ireland’s integration into the world-economy, and the respective roles of Irish state and societal institutions. The book places the Irish welfare state in a comparative European context and examines the extent to which Ireland fits into existing welfare typologies. It looks at the key policy areas of welfare support for those of working age, pensioners and children. It outlines the development of welfare systems in each area, describes the current level of coverage in a comparative context and outlines key debates. It also examines key policy issues including public opinion on the Irish welfare state, proposals for a basic income and debates on the privatization of welfare. The book concludes by discussing the possible future directions of welfare policy in Ireland.

Fictional Imagination of Neil Jordan, Irish Writer and Film Maker: A Study of Literary Style
2009 0-7734-4761-X
This work examines Neil Jordan’s use of images taken from Irish history, Catholicism, the Irish land and the world of art and the senses, in his films and, heretofore unexamined novels.

Gender, Identity and the Irish Press, 1922-1937. Embodying the Nation
2002 0-7734-7298-3
This study of the Irish Press from 1922-1937 demonstrates the ways in which particular gendered symbols, archetypes and images were used to embody notions of Ireland and Irishness: from emigration to unemployment, from militant Republicanism to the sinful pleasures of the jazz age.

Gerard Boate's Natural History of Ireland
2006 0-7734-5919-7
This is an original edition of Gerard Boate’s Natural History of Ireland. Dedicated to Oliver Cromwell, it was written after the 1641 uprising in Ireland in which investors were to be paid in Irish lands. Boate’s work contained detailed information about Ireland that he received from his older brother, Arnold, and English planters. It was hoped that the book would attract settlers to Ireland.

This work will appeal to scholars in Anglo-Irish Studies, Science, History, Philosophy, Geography, Natural History, and the 17th Century.

Historical Residues in the Old Irish Legends of Queen Medb: An Expanded Interpretation of the Ulster Cycle
2010 0-7734-3649-9
Medb of Connacht, a central female character of medieval Ireland's Ulster Cycle is read traditionally as an example of a misogynistic, patriarchal Christian campaign to suppress and silence women in early Ireland, or as symbolic of a primordial, mythic pre-Christian goddess, exempt from patriarchal censure because her behavior is ascribed to her duties as a divine sovereignty figure. In addition, this work provides the first comparative and comprehensive character analysis of the Connacht warrior queen across numerous tales in which she appears as a major player, presenting a more complete picture of her character across the tales than has previously been offered. Such an approach also allows for a reading of Medb as a literary reflection of the socio-political tensions present in the historical period during which the texts emerged, and perhaps as a reflection of historical women who helped to produce those tensions in their societies, including gender-related tensions every bit as complex and complicated as our own are today.

History of the Present of Child Protection and Welfare Social Work in Ireland
2004 0-7734-6405-0
This book is the first detailed history of child protection and welfare social work practice in the Republic of Ireland, providing a comprehensive and in-depth account of the development of social work within the child protection and welfare system in the Republic of Ireland. Drawing on a broad range of archival sources, the book illuminates the complex and often contradictory nature of child welfare practices over the period 1862-1991. The archival data provided in the book should provide an excellent starting point for persons interested in furthering the study of the nature of child welfare and/or social work in the Republic of Ireland.

The book applies a methodology of a history of the present in a rigorous manner, drawing from Foucault’s conceptualizations of archaeology, genealogy, and discourse. The book attempts to deconstruct and reconstruct the theorization of social work in ‘the social’ (Foucault, 1977; Donzelot, 1980, Parton, 1991) within the context of Irish social work. It is likely that both the methodological and theoretical aspects of this book, applied in such a grounded way, will be of great interest to a broad audience of social scientists and historians.

History, Myth and Ritual in the Fiction of John Mcgahern Strategies of Transcendence
2002 0-7734-7018-2
For this study of the fiction of Irish writer McGahern, one of the prominent writers to follow the generation of James Joyce, White (Presentation College, UK) talked extensively with McGahern and studied all of his published novels and short stories. White finds a variety of themes in McGahern's work, including a sense of social fragmentation, the role of ritual in sustaining the hope of transformation, and the hierarchical structure of the family. Running throughout McGahern's work is the hope for a possibility of transcendence to an ideal world.

How Irish Women Writers Portray Masculinity
2006 0-7734-5558-2
The roles of men and women in Ireland have changed a great deal in the last fifty years and many of these changes can be attributed to the dual influence of the Irish Women’s Movement and Ireland’s inclusion in the European Community/Union. While these two influences affected many rapid legal changes toward equality for women and men in Ireland, Irish society has been slow to reflect these shifts. The novels examined in this book reflect the gap between these legal and societal changes.

Il Medioirlandese / Middle Irish: A Translation Into Italian of the Gaelic Text an MheÁn-Ghaeilge by Liam Breatnach
2013 0-7734-4472-6
The only book of its kind that offers a detailed account of the orthography, phonology and morphology of Middle Irish available in print. This is an important research tool for linguists and professors and graduate students working in the language arts. The book covers key issues of initial mutations, and gives a detailed account of inflection and word formation of nouns, adjectives, pronouns, numerals, adverbs, verbs and prepositions. Attested forms are commented upon from a historical point of view, and the dynamics of linguistic conversation and innovation, the mechanism of analogy, contrasting the Middle Irish forms with the corresponding Old Irish ones with an eye on the evolution of the language.

Imaginative Empiricist - Thomas Aiskew Larcom (1801-1879) and Victorian Ireland
2002 0-7734-7068-9


Impact of the English Colonization of Ireland in the Sixteenth Century
2012 0-7734-2658-2
No scholarship exists on the English colonization of Ireland in the sixteenth centuries from a post-colonial perspective, and this book seeks to fill in that gap in the literature. While aimed at academic generalists, and described as an introduction to the topic, the book expands ongoing discussions about the nature of imperialism, and whether or not there is a paradigmatic way in which it occurs that transcends its particular time and place. Ireland is a microcosm that when studied reveals how the contemporary world still shows lingering traces of colonialism. Hendrix convincingly shows how English involvement in the region forever changed the cultural landscape of Ireland.

Influence of Mass Media on Divorce Referenda in Ireland
2010 0-7734-3797-5
This work utilizes quantitative research methods to analyze twenty seven opinion polls dealing with the issue of constitutional change in Ireland. It provides a framework for anyone interested in understanding the intricate relationships between media, public opinion and constitutional ballot issues in an Irish/European context.

Ireland and the Quality of Life, 1841-1861: the Famine Era
1997 0-7734-8677-1
This work addresses the role of stress in the lives of people and the quality of life which stress induced as people tried to cope with the Irish famine. From the 1841 census, the author has constructed a ten-variable index of the quality of life in each of Ireland's thirty-two counties and four provinces. The index is repeated for 1861. The original data are developed from census sources and so may be construed as longitudinal in nature and archival in source. In addition, commentaries of the time are drawn on, so the empirical-statistical perspective is supplemented by narrative accounts. Includes illustrations from the original pages of The Illustrated London News, the Pictorial Times, and the humor magazine Punch.

Irish Adaptations of Greek Tragedies Dionysus in Ireland
2001 0-7734-7466-8
In the 20th century alone, over twenty Irish authors have adapted more than twenty versions of ancient Greek tragedies, or plays based on Greek themes. Through a comparative analysis of Irish dramas (from playwrights Yeats, MacNeice, Kennelly, Heaney, Mahon, and McGuinness) and the original Greek Tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, this volume explores the theatrical relationship between the political and the personal, the Classical and the contemporary, the Irish and the Greek.

Irish Fiction and Postmodern Doubt. An Analysis of the Epistemological Crisis in Modern Irish Fiction
2004 0-7734-6518-9
This study situates three contemporary Irish novelists, Aidan Higgins, John Banville and Neil Jordan in the context of Modernist and Postmodernist literature. In order to map how these writers respond to the problems of epistemological doubt, their work is positioned beside that of other writers like Rushdie, Nabokov, Calvino, Garcia-Marquez and Robbe-Grillet. In addition, the opening chapter outlines a working position on the meaning and significance of Postmodernism, as it pertains to literary fiction, with particular reference to the work of Brian McHale, Ihab Hassan, Patricia Waugh, David Harvey, Richard Kearney and David Lodge. Although firmly rooted in Irish literary studies, this work represents a departure from recent critical work in Irish literature in that it seeks, responding to the specificity of the fictionalized concerns of these writers, to contextualize the fictions of Higgins, Banville and Jordan within Irish and international literary traditions, rather than in an Irish historical or political framework.

Irish in Popular Literature in the Early American Republic Paddy Whacking
2000 0-7734-7838-8
This anthology collects and organizes the multiform depictions of the Irish from 1786-1840, in a volume that establishes the origins of the American cultural fixation on representations of the Irish.

Irish Song-Craft and Metrical Practice Since 1600
2003 0-7734-6782-3
This work is a systematic analysis and classification of Irish accentual verse-metres. It will interest linguists and students of metre, as well as ethnomusicologists studying the context of Irish traditional song, and musicologists studying the historical development of European song-forms. An assessment of previous contributions to the study of Irish verse-practice is followed by a general survey of metrical scholarship, which in turn lays the groundwork for a metrical theory of Irish accentual verse. Space is devoted to a phenomenologically-based discussion of the role of rhythm in spoken Irish and its implications for verse-structure. The heart of the work consists of a taxonomical survey of Irish accentual verse-types, in which the principal criterion for inclusion in a given category is the number of stressed syllables in a line. Following chapters deal with stanzaic and supra-stanzaic structure and verse-ornament, the musical context of verse, the ways in which musical metre differs from verse metre, and the implications of such differences for a system of versification primarily transmitted through a musical medium.

James Clarence Mangan, Edward Walsh and Nineteenth-Century Irish Literature in English
2000 0-7734-7498-6
This study considers a new evaluation of Mangan and Walsh, by referring to the problems of Irish literature in a more international context using the theories of Even-Zohar and Andre Lefevere. The book highlights the fact that literary fame depends on ideological and cultural concerns and not solely on aesthetics. By appraising the achievements of Mangan and Walsh, it shows how ideology in Ireland affected their reputations, leading to their marginalization.

Jungian Reading of Selected Poems of Seamus Heaney
2007 0-7734-5391-1
This book is a study of the poetry of Seamus Heaney collected in his volume Opened Ground, in which the poems are read in Jungian terms. Heaney had referred to himself as “Jungian in religion” and naturally used terms such as “initiation”, “individuation” and the “unconscious” in interviews and essays. Therefore, key Jungian terms are examined in relation to Heaney’s poetic expression of these and explored through at least one poem from each of the collections represented in Opened Ground. This allows for an exploration of the creative tensions involved in the poet’s presentation of personal, poetic and political concerns, while also allowing for further examination of the powerful physicality and musical qualities of the language in which he luxuriates.

Justice, History and Language in James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake
2002 0-7734-7035-2


Lady Wilde's Letters to Constance Wilde, Friends and Acquaintances, with Selected Correspondence Received
2013 0-7734-4501-3
The current final volume is a collection of correspondence written by Lady Jane Wilde to her daughter-in-law, Constance Wilde, as well as other friends and acquaintances. Lady Wilde, like her son Oscar, was an excellent writer. She had a wide range of interests. Much of the ridicule directed at Lady Wilde and her writing and lifestyle followed the imprisonment of her son in 1894 and reflected Victorian prejudices. These letters provide a different picture: that of a reflective, intelligent and kind woman.

An excellent work in deciphering Lady Wilde’s personal handwritten letters and correspondence. An invaluable source of new information to scholars reassessing the lives of the Wildes, studying the status of women, or working in the field of Irish literature.

Life and Writings of James Owen Hannay ( George A. Birmingham), Irish Writer (1865-1950)
1995 0-7734-9123-6
This first biography of Hannay uses original sources, family papers, and the Hannay archive at Trinity College, Dublin, to show a more complex figure than merely a novel-writing clergyman. His involvement in Irish politics and in particular with Douglas Hyde's Gaelic League, the contemporary scandals involving his early novels and the productions of his successful play General John Regan, and his masterly use of comedy to point up the ironies of Irish history are documented. The book contains thirty-one illustrations and a complete bibliography of all Hannay's fictional, journalistic, and theological writing.

Literary Landscapes of Ireland: Geographies of Irish Stories, 1929-1946
2009 0-7734-3894-7
This piece of literary geography examines the relationship between landscape and identity in the works of nine Irish writers who published English language novels between 1929-1946. Focusing upon the distinct lebenswelt experiences and depictions by these Irish writers, an engagement with Mikhail Bakhtin’s ‘Historical Poetics’ sets the periodicity of early post- independent and partioned Ireland in rhythm with the distinct senses of place and spaces of culture to which each writer’s works give birth. This book contains four color photographs.

Marmion Wilme Savage 1804-1872. Dublin’s Victorian Satirist
2000 0-7734-7689-X
Marmion Savage wrote in Dublin during the notorious potato famines; criticizing extremes of political intellectual behavior which he believed were taking his homeland into the wrong directions. His five novels express these ideas, leaving few groups unscathed, including nearly all major Irish factions, political or not, many of the English, and even Americans from whose gigantic ‘wilderness’ and the resulting plethora of working class people’s dangers he wished to save his starving countrymen. This unbiased critical biography, based on twenty years of research, erases years of scholarly neglect, piecing together fragments of truth and falsehood.. For the first time, his persistent use of light satire is defined and recognized. He wrote multi-subgeneric novels with one dominant mode, a form typical in Victorian fiction. These are analyzed and explained, with brief summaries of his five long novels (now out of print), and illustrated in detail. The study includes a complete modern collected bibliography, a summary of all known criticism from his times, with detailed appendices, which includes an index.

Metaphysics of George Berkeley (1685-1753), Irish Philosopher
1992 0-7734-9561-4
This study of Berkeley's metaphysics, with his insistence on the existence of God and importance of the human spirit, takes account not only of Berkeley's treatment of his contemporaries and English critics, but also of his great influence on contemporary French philosophers. The approach is not analytic but phenomenological.

Narrative Strategies in Joyce's Ulysses
1988 0-7734-1994-2
This books tackles the central stylistic problem of Ulysses -- the fact that many of Joyce's experiments seem to be divergences from the novelistic story. By tracing key words, images and voices through the labyrinth of the later episodes, it develops new proof of the novel's formal unity. There are revealing observations about the way Joyce transforms parody into a mode of celebratory lyricism. Brings a fresh perspective to the puzzle of Joyce's styles, linking character and discourse in a humanistic appreciation of the author's artistry.

Nature of Social Work in Ireland: a Historical Perspective
1999 0-7734-8177-X
This volume provides the first comprehensive account of professional social work in Ireland, to contribute to a better understanding of its present form and nature. It considers the development of social work from the late 19th century to the present. In addition to analyzing the main shifts and continuities over this period, it also considers its surrounding conditions: the relationship between social work and philanthropy in its earlier phases, the impact of the Catholic Church on the development of Irish social work and the influence of the State over the shape and form of social work. In addition, it contributes to a debate about its present form and nature at a time when many uncertainties surround its future direction. For a reader outside of Ireland, in particular, the book provides insight into the cultural, political and social context within which Irish social work emerged over the past century. “. . . this book is a must for all social workers and students of social work in Ireland. As the first of its kind it will also be of importance to those researching the origins of social work in Europe and throughout the English-speaking world. . . . there are many gems throughout the text. . . .” – British Journal of Social Work “. . . as a groundbreaking survey, this book will in the meantime remain the authoritative source for students of Irish social work and for researchers who take up Skehill’s challenges to dig further into the puzzles of informing the present b reference to the past.” – International Social Work “This book provides a detailed, well-documented account of ‘social work’ from the nineteenth century until the present day and is therefore an invaluable source for students, lecturers, researcher and professionals who are trying to understand social work practices and the profession within Ireland. . . . Skehill skillfully draws on available source material to document how the State, Catholic Church and civic institutions have influenced the development of social work in Ireland.” – European Journal of Social Work

New Voices in Irish Literary Criticism
2007 0-7734-5363-6
This book combines twelve essays derived from the proceedings of the New Voices in Irish Criticism Conference of 2005, which took place at Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, all of which concentrate on the intersection between text and theory in the field of Irish Studies. All of the contributors to this volume have an interest in developing novel ways of reading both traditional and conventional Irish texts through various theoretical contexts, which include postcolonialism, feminism, psychoanalysis and deconstruction. The development and subversion of traditional critical approaches to Irish texts evidenced by these essays emphasizes the necessity for a theoretical thrust in Irish Studies, in order for conceptions of Irishness to avoid stagnation through constant critique, expansion and re-invention.

Nineteenth-Century Irish English: A Corpus-Based Linguistic and Discursive Analysis
2012 0-7734-3070-9
This is the first book to carefully analyze the linguistic conventions associated with Irish English folklore. Other books have studied linguistics in this language variety by studying letters, and all have ignored the use of folklore in constructing language conventions. This is the first book to discuss how peasants played a role in the construction of the Irish English languages.

The main purpose of this volume is the study of linguistic and discursive aspects of nineteenth-century Irish-English. The purpose is to introduce new insights into the historical evolution and development of this variety of dialect. This is done through the investigation of particular texts that fit a typology that until now have never been used as a source of historical dialect material. The texts chosen are written transcriptions of oral tales narrated by Irish peasant storytellers.

Patricio: A Construcao Da Imagem De Un Santo / How the Historical Patrick Was Transformed Into the St. Patrick of Religious Faith
2013 0-7734-4552-8
Several books dedicated to the life and career of Saint Patrick seem not to take narrative problems into consideration or at least not to focus on them. The main subject in this particular field is the real or historical Patrick, in contrast to the fictional. The authors of these works try to overcome the gap between referent and representation, transcending then in order to find a hidden meaning in the past. Part of the so-called Patrician problem is related to this need of being forced to choose between real and representation. Patrick’s history is analyzed differently in this research; we are more interested in understanding the representations than to transcend them.

Performative and Textual Imaging of Women on the Irish Stage, 1820-1920
2007 0-7734-5492-6
This book explores the way women, specifically women perceived or presented as Irish, were represented on the Dublin stage by playwrights and actors from the 1820s to the 1920s. Yet, rather than being a feminist reading of modern Irish theatre, this book presents a nationalist and socialist reading of the theatre in its cultural and historical contexts. Arguably, the developmental process that Ireland and its theatre experienced from the eve of Catholic Emancipation to the radical idealism of the 1916 Easter Rising was one of national and social advancement. The radical agitators near the end of this period, including those in the theatre, sought self-determination for Ireland and, more importantly, self-determination for all of the Irish regardless of gender, class, or religion. This book’s argument is that as the stage image of the Irish woman modernized from the early nineteenth century into the twentieth, it mirrored the modernization of Ireland.

Plays of Eva Gore-Booth
1991 0-7734-9912-1
Eva Gore-Booth, active feminist and pacifist, and sister of the Irish rebel leader Constance Markievicz, published at least nineteen volumes of poems, plays, and prose during her lifetime. Included under this title are all five of Gore-Booth's plays; well-wrought, actable dramas drawing at times on the same materials Yeats, Lady Gregory, Synge, and AE molded into Ireland's literary renaissance. Supplemented by introductions, a bibliography, and appendices including relevant notes from the 1929 Poems, materials from a rare 1916 edited version of a longer play, and a chronology.

Plight of Three Celtic Languages - Welsh, Irish, and Gaelic. What Can Be Done to Rescue Them?
2011 0-7734-3639-1
This study examines the current situation of the Celtic languages in Ireland, Scotland and Wales. It demonstrates how, over a significant period of time, they shifted under pressure from the domination of English from monolingualism to bilingualism.

Poet John Hewitt, 1907-1987 and Criticism of Northern Irish Protestant Writing
2002 0-7734-7274-6
This study questions the validity of John Hewitt’s prominence in Northern Irish Protestant writing and asserts the need for a more accurate history of this genre. Confronting the received wisdoms of a highly politicized discourse, it undermines Hewitt’s status within it as a matchless, acceptable Protestant for a critically re-visioned Ireland. Challenging the substance of Hewitt’s self-representations as icon of cultural liberalism, radical secular dissenter, and verse-apologist for the ‘Planter condition’, this book shows that his elevation over the majority of northern Protestants is tenable only within an incomprehensive history of Northern Irish Protestant writing that diminishes other important figures. The study provides a framework for a more equitable study of Protestant voices.

Politics of Irish Social Policy 1600-1990
1992 0-7734-9463-4
This study challenges traditional notions of the formation of Irish social policy which cast the process in terms of a progression from barbarism to enlightenment. Identifies and uses working-class sources where they are available, as well as the views of the ruling elite. The first three chapters deal with the colonial period from 1600-1922. The last four chapters address social policy in post-Independence Ireland, including the welfare system as experienced by the poor, right up to 1990.

Postcolonial Theory in Irish Drama From 1800 - 2000
2004 0-7734-6498-0
This study demonstrates the practical application of postcolonial theory to Irish drama. It argues that postcolonial tactics must evolve to suit temporal needs, calling for a re-evaluation of writers too easily dismissed or overlooked in earlier generations. Starting with Sheridan’s sister, Alicia LeFanu, around the Act of Union, moving to Dion Boucicault’s comedic melodramas post-famine, then to W.B. Yeats’ romantic Celt mythology plays, on to Brian Friel’s interrogation of nationalisms, and finally to contemporary voices now emerging, analyses of the focus plays and their public reception illustrates why drama, as a communally received literate work, may more powerfully voice postcolonial concerns than the previously privileged novel form.

Printing, Literacy and Education in 18th Century Ireland: Why the Irish Speak English
2005 0-7734-6033-0
This book details the history of the spread of printing and literacy in eighteenth century Ireland. In addition to being a historical survey, it is also a study, in the “media ecological” vein, that explores what happens when a new technology is introduced to a given culture. This work answers three key questions: first, why did print technology take so long (300 years after Gutenberg) to become a cultural influence in Ireland; second, why was there an “explosion” of printing and presses in Ireland between 1750 and 1800 and finally, why, when a printing industry had been established, was almost the entire output of printed literature in English rather than the Irish language?

Quality of Life and Modernization in Nineteenth-Century Ireland
2006 0-7734-5921-9
In this work, the uncertainties of social change across the nineteenth century are evident. Changes occurred in the natural order with the rhythm of the seasons and with the calamitous failure of the potato crop in 1845. Change in the realm of ideas began with Daniel O’Connell’s campaign for the emancipation of the majority Catholic population. After 1829, his efforts to repeal the Act of Union evolved into the Home Rule Campaign which continued into the twentieth century.

In the social domain, especially after 1850, there were important changes in the size of the population as clearance and emigration reduced the population. The quality of housing improved, literacy rose, and the proportion of monolingual Irish speakers declined.

The author’s quality of life index, based on census data, demonstrates the processes of social change. The quality of life index, calculated for each of Ireland’s thirty-two counties, is applied to examine the physical condition of a sample of young men.

With the matrix of life across the nineteenth century, the work presents a picture of Irish people exploring Ireland. Examples are the censuses at intervals of a decade, the Ordnance Survey, the Templemore Memoir, and the development of railways. Mechanisms of change include the famine, land clearance, emigration, and education.

Question of Irish Identity in the Writings of William Butler Yeats and James Joyce
1998 0-7734-8237-7
This study seeks to redefine the notions of Irishness and of Irish identity which have been current in cultural and socio-political discourse since the beginning of this century, and secondly, it offers readings of the work of William Butler Yeats and James Joyce which demonstrate their similar negative epistemologies of identity. It is part of the work’s argument that cultural and aesthetic writings have seminal influences on the political infrastructure of the modern nation, and so the book analyzes the political import of cultural and literary movements. In what is possibly the first such project in terms of Irish studies, it offers a critique of essentialist and foundationalist views of Irishness as Gaelic, Catholic, and nationalist, through the application of the theoretical writings of Theodore Adorno, Jacques Derrida, and Emmanuel Levinas. Given the current conflicts of identity in Northern Ireland, this is a timely study which sheds light on the mindsets which create mutually exclusive notions of identity.

Reading Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin, a Contemporary Irish Poet. The Element of the Spiritual
2009 0-7734-4831-4
This is the first full-length study of Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin. The work, using as its starting point the ideas of theorists such as Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida in relation to the unspeakable other, demonstrates how poetry can give voice to the existential experience of being.

Representations of Gender and Female Subjectivity in Contemporary Irish Drama by Women
2010 0-7734-1421-5
Departing from the assumption that female-authored drama has developed its own strategies or revitalized older ones, this book traces dramatization of the specific female experience on the contemporary Irish stage. This work also rescues from obscurity plays written by lesser known authors.

Role of Ireland in the Life of Leopold Von Ranke (1795-1886)
2007 0-7734-5326-1
This book investigates Leopold von Ranke’s concept of objectivity by looking at his private life and how it influenced his historical writing, primarily in regards to his marriage, examining his treatment of Irish history as contrasted with his account of English history. His wedding to Clarissa Graves, an Irish woman, in 1843 not only changed his whole life, it also influenced the writing of his books. Hundreds of spontaneous letters of Clarissa to her relatives in England and Ireland contain details of contacts, meetings, information on documents that were copied in archives, descriptions of research trips, and meetings with statesmen which reveal how Ranke worked, collected his material, and eventually composed his books.

Role of Irish Women in the Writings of Edna O’brien: Mothering the Continuation of the Irish Nation
2010 0-7734-3672-3
This book examines the interconnections between nationalism and sexuality in Edna O’Brien’s writing. The work explores the connections between Irishness and sexual reproduction that define women as good Irish citizens, exposes the dysfunctions with rural communities that strive to contain women with limited roles and rewrites them to offer her female characters increased agency. This book contains two color photographs and eight black and white photographs.

Role of Ruling Class Adaptability in the British Transition From Ancien Regime to Modern State: The Open Elite of Britain and Ireland From the Middle Ages to the Second World War
2010 0-7734-1464-9
This work examines how the landed elite openly absorbed a regular flow of new members to the ruling class. It examines the transition of Britain from aristocratic rule to democracy through a study of the Whig Party.

Rural Politics in County Meath, Ireland: Ethnographic and Historical Studies
2013 0-7734-3077-6
This book studies the agrarian and political aspects of a local community in Mead County, Ireland. Based on field research this book is a careful study of how the social dimensions of the community have evolved over the last seventy years. It takes into account policies from a meta-political level down to a micro-level. This study also looks at the way politicians in Ireland make government more responsible to the needs of local communities, even though this power was largely lost by the 1970’s. It also shows the meta-political forces that shape the community.

Scriptural Poetics in Joyce’s Finnegans Wake
2002 0-7734-7145-6


Secret of Secrets (Secreta Secretorum). A Modern Translation, with Introduction of the Governance of Princes
2008 0-7734-5118-8
This work is a modern translation of James Yonge’s manuscript, The Gouernaunce of Prynces, which was originally completed by a Dominican scholar in 1422. Yonge’s text has been noted as one of the primary documents written during the English occupation of Ireland, but until now, his work was only available to scholars literate in Middle English. This book facilitates additional information and a better understanding of the work.

Selected Plays of Irish Playwright Teresa Deevy, 1894-1963
2003 0-7734-6635-5
This volume is a welcome re-issuing of the dramatic writings of one of Ireland’s most important women writers. Teresa Deevy’s plays provided a viable female viewpoint on the tensions between individual selfhood and nationhood in Ireland in the 1930s and 1940s. This volume includes her most critically acclaimed writing for Dublin’s Abbey Theatre: The King of Spain’s Daughter, Katie Roche and The Wild Goose. It also publishes, for the first time, her compelling radio drama, Supreme Dominion. Deevy’s plays have continued to attract popular interest since her death in 1963, and her importance in terms of modern theatre, Irish studies, and women’s studies cannot be underestimated.

Shipping Freight by Water in Britain and Ireland. Calculating Economic Cost and Environmental Opportunities
2010 0-7734-4850-0
Examines the prospects of increased participation of Britain and Ireland in freight trade shipping. The dependence of both island nations on road haulage has led to environmental concerns over congestion, pollution, road damage and heavy fuel consumption. This book contains twelve color photographs.

Six Essays on Edward Martyn (1859-1923), Irish Cultural Revivalist
2004 0-7734-6492-1
The many roles which Edward Martyn filled in order to realize his dreams of reform in the Irish Revival are comprehensively explored in this collection of essays. Martyn’s roles included host, patron, novelist, playwright, satirist, aesthete, collector of books and pictures, benefactor, journalist, and theatre director. His many activities, often forgotten or misunderstood, are documented here and set forth, for the first time, in the wider context of the multifaceted movement of Irish cultural nationalism which involved Martyn in developing relationships with fellow revivalists such as George Moore, Lady Gregory, Arthur Griffiths, D. P. Moran, Standish James O’Grady, and W. B. Yeats. This distilled analysis of the origins, development and failure of many of Martyn’s reforms extends to a probing of the roots of Ireland’s failure to achieve cultural independence during the 1920s and 30s when the very type of provincialism which Martyn so vehemently opposed became the conventional wisdom of the newly independent Irish Free State.

Sociological and Spiritual Aspects of Palliative Care in Ireland. Understandings of a “ Good Death”
2011 0-7734-1570-X
This book explores understandings of a ‘good death’ and the spiritual dimension of care in an Irish palliative care setting. It provides a new theoretical framework in which these experiences and how they are shaped by their cultural context can be understood.

Staging Yeats in the Twenty-First Century
2006 0-7734-5570-1
An avant garde playwright whose theories of stagecraft evolved through performance experience, W.B. Yeats left a complex body of dramatic materials. This book establishes dramaturgical criteria, based on the playwright’s own words, by which all productions of his plays might be judged. Then, through an analysis of Yeats’s plays in performance, it suggests how new stage productions might best engage audiences without violating either texts or theories. Based on fifty years of study and publication about Yeats’s stagecraft and on direct experience with the plays in production both in America and in Ireland, this study develops dramaturgical plans for new productions and shares with readers behind-the-scenes notes from the author’s American Yeats production and from the first three years of James W. Flannery’s International W.B. Yeats Theatre Festival at Dublin’s Abbey Theatre. Its basic premise turns on the belief that with new technology and with directors who accept the text as living theatre worthy of imaginative stage productions for a more general audience, rather than period pieces intended for an elite few, Yeats could finally emerge as a dramatist on a scale with Beckett, Strindberg, O’Neill and other major innovators of the modern stage.

Studies in the Quality of Life and Human Development in Ireland and Britain Since the Sixteenth Century
2010 0-7734-1371-5


Transcription of the Latin Writings of St. Patrick From Seven Medieval Manuscripts ( Dublin, Paris, London, Rouen, Arras, Salisbury)
2009 0-7734-4760-1
These manuscripts, the Confessio and the Epistola ad milites Corotici, otherwise difficult to access, are here transcribed with introductions and notes useful to scholars in many fields.

Unionist Popular Culture and Rolls of Honour in the North of Ireland During the First World War and Other Diverse Essays
2012 0-7734-1501-7
Nanette Norris is the editor of this collection of ten essays on popular culture. The essays cover a vast track of time during the twentieth century and are a sampling of current scholarship on Ireland. The collection uses cultural, historical, and economic contextualization to analyze its consumption. The essays are united in their attempt to use hindsight to explain the influence of popular culture depicting iconic images in film, television, music, and even comic books.

Use of Imaginary, Historical and Actual Maps in Literature: How British and Irish Authors Created Imaginary Worlds to Tell Their Stories ( Defoe, Swift, Wordsworth, Kipling, Joyce, Tolkien)
2013 0-7734-4547-1
In this text, the author highlights unrecorded discoveries about how maps and literature are associated. Not only do maps give us a tool by which to understand a physical reality as it actually exists, but maps can support the realm of literary fiction – such as Tolkien’s Middle Earth, or Stevenson’s Treasure Island. There are also maps that try to catch a certain historical moment like an urban space at a particular time period, or a rural environment. While maps had historically guided travel, in literature they provide an escape mechanism that transports the audience to an unfamiliar place. Maps can create images that color the contours of the reader’s imagination, thereby fortifying the creativity of the story being told. Is there a verisimilitude where the authors are trying to realistically depict a scene as it actually exists, or does the story try to create a magical fantasy world conjured up out of thin air? The use of maps gives an array of options, and the story can hinge on what kind of setting the author creates through their employment.

Voice, Boundary and Identity in the Works of James Joyce
2006 0-7734-5522-1
This book is a study of the weaving and unweaving of particular subject positions within James Joyce’s major works (Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegan’s Wake) through representations of voice, which necessarily negotiates identity, authority, and subjectivity. In the narrowest sense, voice reveals itself as a portion of the narrative which in turn stands as part of the discourse of a particular work. A movement to a more broadly conceived view of voice has it supersede the narrative and function throughout the discourse. Permutations of these concepts locate voice at nearly all levels of Joyce’s fiction. This work explores the myriad of ways that Joyce portrays and negotiates identity through voice and the conceptualization of boundaries that exist “in between” different and distinct subjectivities. The author explores those negotiative identities and subjectivities from within the conceptualization and representation of voice. More often than not, however, a study of voice reveals the inevitability of specific identities to merge and flow into one another, despite futile attempts to retain individuality. The space existing between two seemingly distinct voices blurs in Joyce’s fiction in the din of conversation and in the fuzziness of representation.

Voyage to the Otherworld Island in Early Irish Literature
1983 0-7734-0418-X