Marmion Wilme Savage 1804-1872. Dublin’s Victorian Satirist

Author: Norman, Paralee
Year:2000
Pages:160
ISBN:0-7734-7689-X
978-0-7734-7689-9
Price:179.95
Marmion Savage wrote in Dublin during the notorious potato famines; criticizing extremes of political intellectual behavior which he believed were taking his homeland into the wrong directions. His five novels express these ideas, leaving few groups unscathed, including nearly all major Irish factions, political or not, many of the English, and even Americans from whose gigantic ‘wilderness’ and the resulting plethora of working class people’s dangers he wished to save his starving countrymen. This unbiased critical biography, based on twenty years of research, erases years of scholarly neglect, piecing together fragments of truth and falsehood.. For the first time, his persistent use of light satire is defined and recognized. He wrote multi-subgeneric novels with one dominant mode, a form typical in Victorian fiction. These are analyzed and explained, with brief summaries of his five long novels (now out of print), and illustrated in detail. The study includes a complete modern collected bibliography, a summary of all known criticism from his times, with detailed appendices, which includes an index.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents (main headings):
Foreword; Preface
1. Introduction: The Early Years; The Creative Years at Dublin Castle; Barrister, Editor, Retirement
2. Light Satire and Hogarth’s Pictorial Composition - The Falcon Family: or, Young Ireland: Satire on Three Groups in Ireland; The Anglo-Irish; The Young Irelanders; The Tractarians
3. Light Satire and the Mode of Personal Development in The Bachelor of the Albany: Satire on Bachelors, Tractarians; Irish Church and Merchants; Personal Development; An Irish Dean; the Merchant Class
4. An Irish Novel: My Uncle the Curate
5. The Last Two Novels and the Shorter Fiction: Reuben Medlicott; or, the Coming Man; The Woman of Business: or, The Lady and the Lawyer; Shorter Fiction: “Clover Cottage”; The Prose Narratives
6. Conclusion: Light Satire; Topical Concerns; Last Two Novels; Modern Canon
7. Appendix A: Notes on the 1845 and 1846 Editions of The Falcon Family, and an Analytic Summary of Reviews of the Novel
8. Appendix B: The Date of the First Edition, Announcement of a Subtitle, and Reviews of The Bachelor of the Albany
9. Appendix C: Reviews of My Uncle the Curate
Bibliography; Index