Carr, Alan Books

Dr Alan Carr is Director of the Doctoral Training Programme in Clinical Psychology at University College Dublin and Consultant Psychologist at the Clanwilliam Institute Dublin. His other publications include The Handbook of Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychology: A Contextual Approach Routledge, 1999); What Works with Children and Adolescents: A Critical Evaluation of Psychological Interventions for Children, Adolescents and Families (Routledge, 2000), Family Therapy: Concepts Process and Practice(Wiley, 2000), The Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse in Ireland (with Deirdre MacIntyre, Edwin Mellen, 2000), Family Therapy and Systemic Practice (University Press of America, 1997), and Positive Practice: A Step By Step Guide to Family Therapy (Harwood, 1995).

Clinical Psychology in Ireland Vol. 1: Empirical Studies of Professional Practice
2000 0-7734-7831-0
Clinical Psychology in Ireland is a series of books edited by Alan Carr, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at University College Dublin. Volumes within the series focus predominantly of empirical research conducted by clinical psychologists within an Irish context along with some papers on theory and practice. The first volume in the series is concerned with empirical studies of professional practice and includes surveys of the work practices, roles and stresses of Irish clinical psychologists. The second volume is a collection of empirical studies of problems and treatment processes in adult populations with psychological difficulties. Empirical studies of problems and treatment process in the field of child and adolescent mental health is the central theme of the third volume in this series. The fourth volume contains accounts of theory, practice and research in the family therapy written by Irish psychologists who have specialized in this particular therapeutic approach. Future volumes in the series will focus on these and other themes including child protection, juvenile offending and the prevention of childhood psychological problems. This book (Volume 1) is a landmark in the history of clinical psychology in Ireland. For the first time, it provides data on the roles of clinical psychologists, the stresses they face at work, and their involvement in complex systems such as child protection. I have no doubt that it will become a standard reference work. Michael Timms, PhD, Senior Clinical Psychologist, National Rehabilitation Board, Dublin, Ireland.

Clinical Psychology in Ireland Volume Four: Family Therapy Theory, Practice and Research
2001 0-7734-7343-2
Clinical Psychology in Ireland is a series of books edited by Alan Carr, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at University College Dublin. Volumes within the series focus predominantly of empirical research conducted by clinical psychologists within an Irish context along with some papers on theory and practice. The first volume in the series is concerned with empirical studies of professional practice and includes surveys of the work practices, roles and stresses of Irish clinical psychologists. The second volume is a collection of empirical studies of problems and treatment processes in adult populations with psychological difficulties. Empirical studies of problems and treatment process in the field of child and adolescent mental health is the central theme of the third volume in this series. The fourth volume contains accounts of theory, practice and research in the family therapy written by Irish psychologists who have specialized in this particular therapeutic approach. Future volumes in the series will focus on these and other themes including child protection, juvenile offending and the prevention of childhood psychological problems.

Clinical Psychology in Ireland Volume Three: Empirical Studies of Problems and Treatment Processes in Children and Adolescents
2001 0-7734-7341-6
Clinical Psychology in Ireland is a series of books edited by Alan Carr, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at University College Dublin. Volumes within the series focus predominantly of empirical research conducted by clinical psychologists within an Irish context along with some papers on theory and practice. The first volume in the series is concerned with empirical studies of professional practice and includes surveys of the work practices, roles and stresses of Irish clinical psychologists. The second volume is a collection of empirical studies of problems and treatment processes in adult populations with psychological difficulties. Empirical studies of problems and treatment process in the field of child and adolescent mental health is the central theme of the third volume in this series. The fourth volume contains accounts of theory, practice and research in the family therapy written by Irish psychologists who have specialized in this particular therapeutic approach. Future volumes in the series will focus on these and other themes including child protection, juvenile offending and the prevention of childhood psychological problems. Volume 3 of Clinical Psychology in Ireland needs little introduction. Alan Carr and his co-authors, seasoned clinicians and researchers in the field of clinical child psychology, provide an exemplar for those who are responding to the present-day demand for evidence-led policy and treatment decisions. Volume 3 in this series complements its volume 1 and 2 predecessors by adding clinical child work to their contributions on adult mental health work and accounts of the professional practice of Irish psychologists. Taken together these impressive papers convey a clear message that clinical psychology research and practice is alive and very well,indeed, in Ireland. Emeritus Professor Martin Herbert, former Director of Clinical Psychology Training at Exeter University.

Clinical Psychology in Ireland Volume Two: Empirical Studies of Problems and Treatment Processes in Adults
2001 0-7734-7339-4
Clinical Psychology in Ireland is a series of books edited by Alan Carr, PhD, from the Department of Psychology at University College Dublin. Volumes within the series focus predominantly of empirical research conducted by clinical psychologists within an Irish context along with some papers on theory and practice. The first volume in the series is concerned with empirical studies of professional practice and includes surveys of the work practices, roles and stresses of Irish clinical psychologists. The second volume is a collection of empirical studies of problems and treatment processes in adult populations with psychological difficulties. Empirical studies of problems and treatment process in the field of child and adolescent mental health is the central theme of the third volume in this series. The fourth volume contains accounts of theory, practice and research in the family therapy written by Irish psychologists who have specialized in this particular therapeutic approach. Future volumes in the series will focus on these and other themes including child protection, juvenile offending and the prevention of childhood psychological problems. This ensemble (Volume 2) represents the very best of traditions in clinical psychology: That of the experimental investigation of psychological problems and explanatory theories which underpin them. This is the scientist-practitioner approach in action. This collection of reviews and empirical studies will be of use to all practicing adult mental health professionals. It will be of particular value to trainee clinical psychologists and other mental health practitioners in training. In the present era of evidence-based practice, what better bed-time reading? Bon appetit! Professor Michael Wang, Director of clinical psychology training, University of Hull.

Clinical Psychology in Ireland
2005 0-7734-6242-2
This volume presents results from a series of empirical studies conducted in the field of child protection in Ireland. These throw light of the epidemiology of child sexual abuse, profiles of survivors and perpetrators of child sexual abuse, and their families, and important treatment-related issues. The following broad conclusions may be drawn from this research. CSA victims were predominantly preadolescent girls, but boys were also abused. CSA survivors had suffered a range of different forms of abuse leading to a variety of psychological problems. Greatest adjustment problems were shown by survivors of coercive, violent, penetrative abuse. Both individual therapy and combined individual and group therapy can alleviate some of the psychological difficulties that arise from CSA. CSA perpetrators were predominantly male, and were rarely strangers. A proportion of perpetrators were adolescents some of whom were survivors of child abuse. Adolescent CSA perpetrators had significant adjustment problems. Theoretically coherent innovative interventions for adolescent CSA perpetrators are being developed. A parent support programme, that runs in parallel to group-based treatment for adolescent CSA perpetrators holds promise as a core element of a comprehensive family-oriented programme for adolescent CSA perpetrators.