Subject Area: New York

American Colonial Militia, Volume IV. The Colonial Militias of New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland
1997 0-7734-8526-0
This series incorporates study of the legislative debate and action, various enactments, attempts to supply equipage, and action in war and peace. It utilizes original source material, primarily state archives, newspapers, and collections of historical societies.

American Moral and Sentimental Magazine ( New York 1797-1798). An Annotated Catalogue
2005 0-7734-6137-X
This New York semi-monthly periodical edited by Thomas Kirk appeared from July 1797 through May 1798 under a voluminous title that marks it as a hybrid serial-anthology/magazine: The American Moral & Sentimental Magazine, consisting of a Collection of Select Pieces, in Prose and Verse, from the Best Authors, on Religious, Moral, and Sentimental Subjects, calculated to Form the Understanding and Improve the Heart. Kirk was especially zealous to defend the “sacred and eternal obligations of Virtue and Religion” as that “affords a pleasure truly rational and refined.” Readers were invited to forward their own or any compositions to the editor, but from the outset, it was apparent that the editor would provide a “Collection of Select Pieces” and had material in hand that might or might not be supplemented by local contributions. In particular, as is documented in this annotated catalogue, Kirk provided a great deal on the “moral” and only a modest number of “sentimental” articles. As the annotations here demonstrate, just as travel narratives could serve the cause of religion, morality could be served by a judicious selection from the literature of sentiment, works wherein rough passions were modestly checked by refined emotions and a rational sensibility.

Archaeological Survey of Artpark and the Lower Landing, Lewiston, New York
1993 0-7734-9280-1
In cooperation with The Lewiston Historical Society and The Anthropology Department of the State University of New York at Buffalo. An archaeological and historical study of Artpark. This site on the eastern banks of the Niagara River in the Town of Lewiston, New York, is situated directly under the Niagara Escarpment, on land that millions of years ago was several times covered by oceans. It is now a center for the performing and visual arts.

Back Number Town. Lewiston, New York
1984 0-88946-025-6
Reprint of a book originally published in Buffalo in 1891. Includes many historic views of Lewiston and its buildings.

Civil War Professional Soldiers, Citizen Soldiers, and Native American Soldiers of Genesee County, New York
2006 0-7734-5718-6
There are probably more books published on the Civil War than any other event in American history. Many volumes focus on the heroic efforts of a single individual or a single unit. The authors portray the individual or unit in Homeric prose as they explain how these extraordinary men preserved the Republic. The truth is, however, that over 2,100,000 ordinary individuals in thousands of ordinary regiments from hundreds of ordinary counties accomplished the extraordinary task of preserving the United States and liberating millions of enslaved persons. This work captures the trials, tribulations and triumphs of these ordinary soldiers by examining the role played by the citizen-soldiers of Genesee County, New York. The citizen-soldiers from Genesee County were ordinary individuals. They were farmers, mechanics, merchants and workers who were moved by their civic responsibility and faithfully performed their duty. This is the first work that examines the contribution of soldiers of Genesee County to the preservation of the union. The work examines the roles played by two Genesee County residents (Emory Upton and Ely Parker) along with three regiments with large contingents of Genesee County residents (12th NY Infantry, 15th NY Cavalry and 8th NY Heavy Artillery) in the Civil War. The well being and security of any republic depends on the commitment of its citizen-soldiers to both cause and comrade. The men of Genesee County exemplified this commitment.

Classroom Lectures on Human Viral Diseases Presented at the City University of New York. An Explanation of Basic Principles
2013 0-7734-4328-2
This college level instructional aid is a concise yet comprehensible review of human viral diseases specifically designed for beginning microbiology instructors and their students. It presents pathogens initially with respect to their biological identity and as an alternative to their presentation in many college textbooks as pathogens of the human organ systems. The material is up-to-date in advances in the science of microbiology.

Dance Pedagogy of Katherine Dunham and Black Pioneering Dancers in Chicago and New York From 1931-1946
2018 0-7734-3539-1
This book, originally written as a doctoral dissertation at Temple University, describes the theory and pedagogy of the major Black dance artists of the 1930’s and 1940’s. The most important of these was Katherine Dunham whose thought influenced a large number of 20th century anthropologists and sociologists.

Dr. Sherrod’s book is important not merely because it recovers the artistic and cultural contributions of dozens of major Black dancers, but also because it documents their enormous social and political influence on mid-century American society.

Environmental History of New York's North Country. The Adirondack Mountains and the St. Lawrence River Valley
2012 0-7734-2628-0
This book is a historical narrative on northern New York that takes into account the role of environmental conservation in an often neglected and remote region of the United States.

Ethnic Geography of Early Utica, New York. Time, Space and Community
1999 0-7734-8046-3
This is the first study which examines how each of the early immigrant communities (German, Irish, Welsh, Polish, Italian) changed the geographical shape of the city. Group identity was so strong that even a century after the first peoples began to arrive, different neighborhoods, and even larger sections of the city, retained the imprint of the immigrants. It is also the story of adaptive strategies followed by each community in responding to economic and social constraints imposed upon it. The study is oriented to the spatial perspective of the urban-cultural geographer. The internal movement of the groups is traced and the rationale for the particular directions of movement is related to physical, economic and cultural factors.

Fifty Year Role of the United States Air Force in Advancing Information Technology. A History of the Rome, New York Ground Electronics Laboratory
2003 0-7734-6538-3
This work provides information previously unavailable to the wider scholarly community: the role of the US Air Force in advancing information and electronics technology. The Air Force established a far-reaching research effort upon becoming a separate service in 1947 and maintains it today. Rome Laboratory, established in 1951, became the Air Force’s primary ground electronics laboratory. Relying on previously classified as well as documentation in the public sphere, this work details Air Force involvement in the development of radio, radar, communications satellites, computers, solid state devices, and photonics. The Cold War serves as backdrop until the last chapter, when attention shifts to more contemporary activities. Each chapter examines an Air Force mission, the technologies employed to accomplish it, and Rome Laboratory’s role. Originality and unique documentation make this work a must-read for those interested in the history of science and technology, Air Force and Department of Defense roles in the information revolution, military history, Cold War history, and the social and economic impact of Air Force R&D on the communities of central New York.

Health Concerns of Hispanics in New York City
1991 0-7734-9852-4
The text examines the morbidity and mortality patterns of Hispanics in New York City, the most rapidly expanding group in the United States. In analyzing the health data from government sources and recent research findings, the authors illustrate the cultural values and health status of this population and how they differ from the other minorities and the general population. Because this group is at high risk for certain maladies, particular attention is paid to asthma, alcohol ingestion, perinatal conditions, AIDS, and drug abuse. The authors also provide suggestions for preventive strategies and more research. Though scholarly in intent, the book is written in laymen's terms and contains a glossary of medical terms employed in the volume.

History of Niagara County, New York
2001 0-7734-7445-5
This work offers history and perspectives on people and places in the history of Niagara Country, New York, including the War of 1812, the Underground Railroad, historic Lockport, celebrities such as Jack London and Belva Lockwood. It doesn’t focus exclusively on the city of Niagara Falls itself, but includes Lockport, North Tonawanda, and the other towns and villages in the County. Includes rare photographs.

History of the 134th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the American Civil War
1997 0-7734-8551-1
The NYSV was one of the few regiments to serve in both the eastern and western theatres of the war. It also had the misfortune to be, for a good deal of its tenure, attached to the ill-fated Eleventh Corps. Highlights of the regiment's service were its near-annihilation at Gettysburg; action around Chattanooga; the brutal march to and from Knoxville; its almost daily action during the Atlanta Campaign, followed by the March to the Sea; and the Campaign of the Carolinas. It contains excerpts from primary source documents, including diaries, memoirs, letters, local newspapers, Company order books, and medical records from the National Archives never before researched, capsule biographies of all 1100 who served, maps and statistical data, and photographs.

History of the Sisters of Charity Hospital, Buffalo, New York, 1848-1900
2005 0-7734-6035-7
In 1848, the Sisters of Charity founded and operated the first hospital in the city, Buffalo Hospital of the Sisters of Charity (Sisters Hospital). The general historical literature has dismissed Catholic hospitals as ethnic hospitals. Too little attention has been paid to the role these hospitals have played in the “new” antebellum commercial cities and in the transition of medicine to its modern practice; nor has the role of women in 19th century hospital management received much attention. This study will analyze how the sister administrators/nurses gained and maintained control of their hospital and exercised “real” authority, within the context of patriarchy, and throughout the 19th century transformation of medical practice. By focusing on the development of Sisters Hospital from 1848-1900, one can trace the transformation of antebellum hospitals from warehouses of the poor sick to the post Civil War emergence of the modern hospital. The story of Sisters Hospital is also the story of changes in the role of physicians, nurses and in medical care, that is, the professionalization and modernization of the health care. By 1900, Sisters Hospital had survived and adapted to the tremendous changes in medical knowledge and the function of hospitals without destroying the orders’ authority over its hospital.

Italian Dream. The Italians of Queens Park, New York City
1991 0-7734-9955-5
This work analyzes the ethnic revival of the 60's and 70's, socioeconomic changes which occurred in Italy and the USA and how they affected the Italian community. Combines "macro" analysis of the social structure and "micro" analysis of personal attitudes with chapters on the community, labor market, the family. Also describes the strategies used to succeed in the United States.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 1
2006 0-7734-5692-9
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 11
2012 0-7734-2566-7
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 3
2012 0-7734-2650-7
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 4
2012 0-7734-2568-3
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 6
2012 0-7734-2541-1
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 7
2012 0-7734-3947-1
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 8
2014 0-7734-4304-5
The Italian musical emigration created an extra Italian community in New York in addition to the community of Italian political refugees and exiles. The Italian population of the city also consisted in part of the visiting transient entertainers in the fields of music, dance, circus and variety.


Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 9
2014 0-7734-0056-7
The Italian musical emigration created an extra Italian community in New York in addition to the community of Italian political refugees and exiles. New theatres and entertainment venues continued to open. The year 1870, on the eve of mass migration, reveals the Italian immigrant community has become more sizable, more visible, more entrenched. The Italian population of the city consisted in part of the visiting transient entertainers in the fields of music, dance, circus and variety many remained in New York permanently and the aging political refugees and exiles.



Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899. Italian-American Society Takes Root - Vol. 8
2012 0-7734-2639-6
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City 1746-1899. Singers and Aerial Swingers, Actors and Comedians at Mid Century 1850-1853 - Vol. 6
2012 0-7734-3935-8
This book is a comprehensive and detailed study of the Italian immigrant theatre of New York City from 1746 to 1899. It is chronologically and geographically detailed, along with details about the actors and principals of that theatre. The author provides factual, personal and anecdotal stories about the principals of this theatre, such as Lorenzo Da Ponte, Adelina Patti, Guglielmo Ricciardi and Antonion Maiori. Through these details, the book explains why theatre was so important to the Italian immigrant population, suggesting that, for one thing, life among the immigrants was itself dramatic, if not theatrical. With its thoroughness and emphasis on the humanness of Italian immigrant society clearly conveyed, this book will be an important contribution to scholarship.

Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City, 1746-1899 - Volume 1, Book 12
2015 0-7734-4251-0


Italian-American Immigrant Theatre of New York City, 1746-1899. Alarm, Resistance, Disapproval 1872 - Volume 1, Book 2
2015 1-4955-0401-8
The Italian musical emigration created an extra Italian community in New York in addition to the community of Italian political refugees and exiles. The Italian population of the city also consisted in part of the visiting transient entertainers in the fields of music, dance, circus and variety.


Italians in Rochester, New York 1940-1960
2008 0-7734-5230-3
This work examines the experience of Italians as Italian-Americans in Rochester, New York, following World War II. Overall, the work explores the meaning of ethnicity and sheds light on anthropological, sociological, and historical theories of ethnicity and its use to advance the goals of a people. This book contains eight black and white photographs.

Italians in Rochester, New York 1900-1940
2001 0-7734-7602-4
Through research into the ethnic roots of his home town of Rochester, NY, Dr. Salamone’s study enables the reader to understand the interplay of social, cultural, and historical forces in shaping a particular variate of Italian-American identity.

Italians of Rochester, New York, Post World War II. Immigration, Prosperity, and Change
2013 0-7734-4326-6
A cogent and multi-generational recounting of the lives of major personalities and institutions that shaped the Italian American experience in Rochester, with attention to: World War II, entertainment, sports, music, educational institutions, politics, crime, marriage, and religion. The work focuses on how ethnic groups more or less successfully adapt to changing ecological circumstances.

Jonathan Edwards’ Early Understanding of Religious Experience. His New York Sermons, 1720-1723
2011 0-7734-1489-4
The significance of Scripture and piety had on Jonathan Edwards’ theology has often been obscured by his innovative use of secular though and reformed theology in his public writings. This study focuses on his earliest sermons and personal writings, which stand [prior to his study of Locke and use of the technical term sense of the heart. In looking at Edwards’ background, faith, and early sermons, this study presents an account of the emergence and expression of his early understanding of religious experience. True religion Edwards discovered, consists of the knowledge of God’s glory, love and grace made manifest by Jesus Christ and supernaturally imparted to the soul of mankind.

Life and Times of John Timon (1797-1867). The First Bishop of Buffalo, New York
2006 0-7734-5943-X
This excellent book is a biography of John Timon (1797-1867), the first bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo, New York. Beginning with the formative period of his youth, as well as his years as a member of the Vincentian order, this book gives a detailed account of Timon’s leadership in Buffalo. While Timon’s many contributions in the areas of education and social services are documented, this study also deals at length with his involvement in issues of great significance for the larger Catholic community in the United States, in particular, trusteeism and the issue of Catholic assimilation into American society. This monograph is the first historical study of the founding bishop of the Roman Catholic Church in Western New York. The author has studied all the available sources and provides a reliable account of both the religious and the social problems of the Buffalo diocese during its first fifty years. This study will be of interest to scholars in American social and religious history. It is an essential resource for all research and Catholic libraries.

Literary Career of Proletarian Novelist and New Yorker Short Story Writer Edward Newhouse
2001 0-7734-7628-2
This is the first study on Edward Newhouse, who wrote proletarian novels in the 1930s, short stories about life during the Great Depression, and went on to a thirty-year career with the New Yorker. He has been a friend of many of the literary giants of the 20th century. His writings from 1929 to 1965 (when he retired from a literary career) are instructive for both an understanding of the radical mindset and as an example of the late manifestation of American literary realism. The author interviewed Edward Newhouse in his home in 1996, and includes these insights as a basis for his analysis of the literary work.

Movement for Community Control of New York City’s Schools, 1966-1970. The Class Wars
1998 0-7734-8262-8
Describes how the failure of racial integration led to new alternative demands for increased parental powers over schooling and ultimately for ‘community control’. The story of the school reform movement citywide and especially that which grew up on three officially-sanctioned demonstration districts in East Harlem, Ocean Hill-Brownsville, and the Lower East Side is told in detail. The clash between parent and community activists on the one hand and majority factions within the teaching and supervisory organizations on the other constitutes the bulk of this work. Matters relating to racial, class and gender configurations are assessed. Broad issues of white racism and black racism come under scrutiny, not least in the context of charges and counter-charges which surfaced at the height of the conflict about black anti-Semitism and Jewish anti-black behavior.

Narratives From the 1971 Attica Prison Riot
2005 0-7734-5980-4
Book examines the Attica Prison uprising of 1971. Specifically, it compares and contrasts five published accounts which were authored by individuals personally involved in the tragedy. After providing a brief history of prison rioting in the United States and reviewing the context of the Attica incident itself, a content analysis of the Attica stories is provided. The analysis reveals four dominant themes: military metaphors, racial friction, the underdog, and attributing responsibility. Suggests that prison riots are largely the result of reciprocally corrosive interchanges between those who live and work within a prison facility.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 1
2006 0-7734-5607-4
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 2
2006 0-7734-5605-8
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 3
2006 0-7734-5603-1
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Weekly Magazine. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose, 1800-1811.
2000 0-7734-7840-X
The New York Weekly began May 17, 1788, as The Impartial Gazetteer and Saturday Evening Post, published by John Harrisson and Stephen Purdy. Both profitable and popular, it culled works from such magazines as Westminster, Town and Country, European, London, Universal, and Lady’s. This catalog is designed to assist those who have learned the value of studying the lesser literature of this period. In addition to the main alphabetical listings, several special-interest headings have been used in a selective ‘subject index’.

Peekskill, New York and the Anti-Communist Riots of 1949
2002 0-7734-7176-6
In the summer of 1949, the Cold War came to Peekskill, NY, as two proposed Paul Robeson concerts were marred by the protests of local veterans’ organizations. The protests exploded into violence as area residents joined the protest. This even provides important insights into the nature of American anti-communism in the early Cold War. The riots, and anti-communism in general, have long been portrayed as the result of political manipulation. This work suggest that it is more a rational response to local, national, and international events than it is a product of political conspiracy. This work rectifies the usual overly-simplified view by examining the cause-and-effect relationships that led to the events, within the larger context of the Cold War.