Pitcher, Edward William

Dr. Edward W. R. Pitcher is Professor Emeritus at the University of Alberta, and the Editor of The Edwin Mellen Press' reference series “Studies in British and American Magazines.”

American Moral and Sentimental Magazine ( New York 1797-1798). An Annotated Catalogue
2005 0-7734-6137-X
This New York semi-monthly periodical edited by Thomas Kirk appeared from July 1797 through May 1798 under a voluminous title that marks it as a hybrid serial-anthology/magazine: The American Moral & Sentimental Magazine, consisting of a Collection of Select Pieces, in Prose and Verse, from the Best Authors, on Religious, Moral, and Sentimental Subjects, calculated to Form the Understanding and Improve the Heart. Kirk was especially zealous to defend the “sacred and eternal obligations of Virtue and Religion” as that “affords a pleasure truly rational and refined.” Readers were invited to forward their own or any compositions to the editor, but from the outset, it was apparent that the editor would provide a “Collection of Select Pieces” and had material in hand that might or might not be supplemented by local contributions. In particular, as is documented in this annotated catalogue, Kirk provided a great deal on the “moral” and only a modest number of “sentimental” articles. As the annotations here demonstrate, just as travel narratives could serve the cause of religion, morality could be served by a judicious selection from the literature of sentiment, works wherein rough passions were modestly checked by refined emotions and a rational sensibility.

An Anatomy of Reprintings and Plagiarisms. Finding Keys to Editorial Practices and Magazine History, 1730-1820
2001 0-7734-7657-1
Gathers a variety of studies of British and American magazines in which the reprinted articles when traced to their origins reveal practices of editors that otherwise might go undetected. Some of these practices are false sales figures, false charges of plagiarism against those from whom the magazines most frequently plagiarized, the disguised reprinting of something old as something new, disclosure of scandal in the lives of persons invented to permit scandal to be disclosed, and promises of wonderful things to appear which never would or were intended to appear.

Anthology of the Short Story in 18th and 19th Century America Volume One
2000 0-7734-7842-6
In this anthology, Dr. Pitcher has illustrated and partially defined the beginnings of short fiction in America in the period before the emergence of our modern understanding of the short story. These beginnings are to be found in the gradual coming together of forms such as anecdote, fable, tall-tale and sentimental story with the increasingly diverse aspirations, images, character types, and historical incidents of a people linked by language and culture to Britain and Europe.

Anthology of the Short Story in 18th and 19th Century America Volume Two
2000 0-7734-7844-2
In this anthology, Dr. Pitcher has illustrated and partially defined the beginnings of short fiction in America in the period before the emergence of our modern understanding of the short story. These beginnings are to be found in the gradual coming together of forms such as anecdote, fable, tall-tale and sentimental story with the increasingly diverse aspirations, images, character types, and historical incidents of a people linked by language and culture to Britain and Europe.

British Magazine January 1760-December 1767, Part 1. An Annotated Index of Signatures, Ascriptions, Subjects, and Titles of Literary Prose
2000 0-7734-7791-8
There is a heavy reliance on extracts from pamphlets and reprintings from contemporary magazines and newspapers.

British Magazine, 1746-1751, Part 2
2002 0-7734-6934-6
Whatever the strengths of the magazine through five volumes, the final volume of five numbers (January-May 1751) is conspicuously poorer in quality. There is a heavy reliance on extracts from pamphlets and reprintings (some veiled) from contemporary magazines and newspapers. Consequently, readers must have noticed the decline in quality and abandoned the magazine during the first half of the year. The final number for May was published late (about mid-June 1751), and then the British was silenced.

Comick Magazine or, Compleat Library of Mirth, Humour, Wit, Gaiety and Entertainment by the Greatest Wits of All Ages & Nations (London: Harrison & Co., March-December 1796)
2006 0-7734-5595-7
An annotated catalogue of The Comick Magazine (March-December 1796). Included in the catalogue is a Register of the Monthly Contents, a Title and Initial-Wording Index in Prose form, a Title and Initial-Wording Index in poetry form, an Index of Authors, Signatures, and Sources, as well as section of Works Cited and Consulted

Court, City, and Country Magazine, 1761-65
2002 0-7734-7055-7
The Court, City and Country Magazines was published from September 1761 to November 1765, but initially monthly numbers appeared under the title of Court Magazine, then in March 1763 they were changed to Court and City Magazines, and another change followed in February 1764 to The Court, City and Country Magazine, and this is the title to the end of the magazine's run, and the title used for the collected final volume.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. An Annotated Initial Wording Index
2003 0-7734-6744-0
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 1. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
2003 0-7734-6747-5
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest. Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 2. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
2003 0-7734-6745-9
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 3. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
2003 0-7734-6749-1
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Facts and Fictions - Discoveries in Periodicals 1720-1820
2000 0-7734-7846-9
Examines British magazine literature of the 18th and early 19th century, and the study of serials in general. Dr. Pitcher has provided substantial lists of emendations to published checklists relevant to the field. Also, he has given not only fifty case histories to introduce authors who were published extensively in the magazines, but also compiled an index of principal works by many of the 18th century essayists who followed Addison and Steele.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 1
2002 0-7734-7107-3
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 2
2002 0-7734-7103-0
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 3
2002 0-7734-7101-4
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Irish in Popular Literature in the Early American Republic Paddy Whacking
2000 0-7734-7838-8
This anthology collects and organizes the multiform depictions of the Irish from 1786-1840, in a volume that establishes the origins of the American cultural fixation on representations of the Irish.

Key ( Fredericktown, Maryland, 1798). An Annotated Catalogue of the Contents with Notes on Authors and Sources
2006 0-7734-6143-4
This Maryland magazine published at Fredericktown by John D. Cary, appeared weekly for twenty-seven numbers, from 13 January through 14 July 1798. The intention was from the beginning to publish selections from various works of entertainment or of cultural value, supplemented by original articles from contributors. Each eight-page number is a blend of prose and verse pieces, with an admixture of brief items of practical value, snippets of news, announcements, etc. Reprinted articles were marked as such by opening and closing quotation symbols, but without mention of sources.

The author here, as the historian of magazines, has undertaken the necessary detective work to let one judge this periodical’s place among similar works. The annotated files disclose the heavy dependency of The Key on previously published material; The author allows that only in the “Observer” serial is there a case for originality, as some of those essays effectively use the idiomatic and colloquial manner of the best contemporary American essay serials (Noah Webster’s “Prompter,” Issac Story’s “Beri Hesdin,” David Everett’s “Common Sense in Dishabille,” John Chamberlain’s “Hermit,” et al.).

The file of published articles is arranged chronologically (by date of publication in The Key) within the Register, and annotations there are meant to assess the kinds of materials published, and as fully as possible to identify sources or routes of transmission (patterns of reprinting between first publication and use in The Key). Ephemeral advertisements, announcements, news items, etc., are noted briefly in the Register, but not indexed. All the literary prose and verse pieces have been filed alphabetically by title, and by initial wording. In an Appendix, Pitcher shows that The Key had a slavish dependence not just on one source, but on three years of a particular magazine, namely 1791, 1795-96, the third, seventh and eighth volumes of the Massachusetts Magazine (at least 120 articles were reprinted).

The annotated index for sources and authors allows one to determine at a glance the kinds of works used as source-texts, and the frequency of the editor’s use of each.

Ladies Magazine, 1749-53
2002 0-7734-6979-6
Considered a publication with information and articles specific for "ladies of society" in Colonial America.

Lady’s Monthly Museum First Series: 1798-1806 an Annotated Index Under Contributors’ Names, Pseudonuymous Signature, and Ascriptions
2000 0-7734-7836-1


Literary Magazine and British Review ( London: 1788-1794). An Annotated Catalog of the Prose and Verse ( Book One)
2005 0-7734-6134-5
Pitcher’s annotated catalogue of its contents (Literary Magazine and British Review for 1788) reveals its explicit emphasis on biography. The great majority of these articles concern French notables, or the less familiar characters attached to them, with a clear editorial interest in contemporaries active in the ferment of the French Revolution. The emphasis on things French is also reflected in reviews and articles translated from French sources (including papers published by scientific societies). The editor records details of the original poems from “Angelina,” but generally shows that the magazine reprints conventional fare. The “American Connection” is shown to be implicit from the outset of publication insomuch as the spelling adopted in early volumes is that established by Noah Webster, and not that followed by every other British magazine (or the Literary after 1791). Pitcher also remarks where the political bias of this magazine is strong and conspicuous.

Literary Magazine and British Review ( London: 1788-1794). An Annotated Catalog of the Prose and Verse ( Book Two)
2005 0-7734-6136-1
Pitcher’s annotated catalogue of its contents (Literary Magazine and British Review for 1788) reveals its explicit emphasis on biography. The great majority of these articles concern French notables, or the less familiar characters attached to them, with a clear editorial interest in contemporaries active in the ferment of the French Revolution. The emphasis on things French is also reflected in reviews and articles translated from French sources (including papers published by scientific societies). The editor records details of the original poems from “Angelina,” but generally shows that the magazine reprints conventional fare. The “American Connection” is shown to be implicit from the outset of publication insomuch as the spelling adopted in early volumes is that established by Noah Webster, and not that followed by every other British magazine (or the Literary after 1791). Pitcher also remarks where the political bias of this magazine is strong and conspicuous. Given this degree of editorial liberal-mindedness, Pitcher concludes in this two-volume study that it is a tribute to British tolerance that the magazine lasted as long as the middle of 1794, although admittedly the optimistically liberal politics championed early were sadly betrayed by le terreur (June 1793 – July 1794), and in the final two years, the Literary Magazine and British Review became increasingly less outspoken.

Literary Prose of Westminster Magazine 1773-1785. An Annotated Index Under Contributors’ Names, Pseudonymous Signature, and Ascriptions
2000 0-7734-7834-5
Table of Contents: Introduction; Annotated Index to Authors of Prose; Alphabetical file for titles of Prose Articles; Biographical Subject Index; Castles and Views Subject Index; Education Subject Index; Religion Subject Index; Trials and Executions Subject Index; Works Cited

Magazine Sources for Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments, by Mr. Addison (London 1794-1797)
2004 0-7734-6575-8
The Interesting Anecdotes by “Mr. Addison” are generally identified as a multi-volume miscellany of prose and verse, collected in 1794-97, but the extant volumes dated 1797 are apparently reissues of volumes which appeared earlier. While the listings here usefully document specific borrowings, the data also suggest the way in which literary magazines had become a resource to spur growth in that part of publishing which provided miscellanies and ‘judicious selections’ to the common reader.

Monthly Ledger, 1773-76. An Annotated Register of the Contents, Vol. 1
2002 0-7734-7235-5


Monthly Miscellany, 1774-77. An Annotated Register of the Contents, Vol. 2
2002 0-7734-7166-9


New American Magazine (Woodbridge, New Jersey, January 1758-March 1760)
2004 0-7734-6346-1
The New American Magazine contained installment features, stories, essays, poems, news, chronicles and lists, the conventional kinds of offering of the established British magazines. The contents of the New American Magazine have been recorded here in a month-by-month Register, with all the articles separately listed by title and initial wording.

New Novelist’s Magazine (London 1786-1788)
2006 0-7734-6141-8
This “elegant collection of the many beautiful little tales and stories scattered throughout innumerable voluminous miscellanies” (Advertisement) was directly inspired by the success of Harrison and Co.’s weekly serialization of their Novelist’s Magazine (1780-88, collected in 23 volumes), but also one of a series of experiments in short-run magazine publications, mixing original with reprinted materials.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 1
2006 0-7734-5607-4
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 2
2006 0-7734-5605-8
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 3
2006 0-7734-5603-1
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Weekly Magazine. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose, 1800-1811.
2000 0-7734-7840-X
The New York Weekly began May 17, 1788, as The Impartial Gazetteer and Saturday Evening Post, published by John Harrisson and Stephen Purdy. Both profitable and popular, it culled works from such magazines as Westminster, Town and Country, European, London, Universal, and Lady’s. This catalog is designed to assist those who have learned the value of studying the lesser literature of this period. In addition to the main alphabetical listings, several special-interest headings have been used in a selective ‘subject index’.

Nightingale or a Melange De Litterature (Boston, May 10 - July 30, 1796). An Annotated Catalogue of Contents and Sources
2005 0-7734-6135-3
The Nightingale; or, A Melange de Littérature … A Periodical publication (Boston, 10 May – 30 July, 1796) is one of several early American periodicals which were experimental blends of the conventional magazine and the miscellany.

Some weeks after The Nightingale began, it was recognized by a young Bostonian writing in the Farmer’s Weekly Museum 4 No. 171 (July 12, 1796) as being of necessity an abbreviated magazine: “Several numbers of a periodical work intitled [sic]The Nightingale have appeared in Boston … The inhabitants of that mercantile place are so constantly engaged in gazing at the rates of insurance, or the manifest of a ship’s cargo, that they have few reading hours, and prefer a crowd on ‘Change to a lounge in the library … [thus] a Belknap, Minot, Clarke, Gardiner, Elliot, and Philenia will not write, because there are none to read … [reprinted in whole in The Nightingale No. 33 (July, 1796): 387-90].”

The implication was that a periodical that more frequently placed a small cluster of short articles in the hands of the public might have a greater success; at the same time, because The Nightingale’s twelve pages appeared three times a week, the miscellaneous materials were greater in aggregate than those supplied by many contemporary monthly magazines, and were largely reprinted materials acquired at little or no cost. Original contributions from local authors were not discouraged but they were inessential, partly because John Lathrop and John Russell were able contributing editors, and they recruited young writers to assist in their project. For example, Isaac Story contributed familiar essays in Nos. 12, 20 and 28, using the pseudonym “Beri Hesdin” [which, after the Nightingale closed down, he used for a series of contributions to the Massachusetts Magazine, and then following the failure of that periodical in December 1796, he used in the Farmer’s Weekly Museum].

This annotated catalogue demonstrates, however, that when original materials were too few, the editors turned to established writers, reprinting, for example several of Joseph Lathrop’s essays without comment on their prior periodical appearances, or availability in Lathrop’s Miscellaneous Collection of original Pieces (Springfield: Russell 1786). Too often (judging by the failure of subscribers to commit to a continuation of the periodical), the editors turned clandestinely to uninspiring selections from British periodicals, or to miscellanies published much earlier in the century.

Pennsylvania Magazine or American Monthly Museum, Philadelphia, 1775-76
2001 0-7734-7326-2
The journal's purpose was to present information and correspondence about "significant" events and cultural activities that were relevant to the Colonies and not to Europe.

Recalling Fiction’s Cultural Context - Early Gothic and Utopian Romance Cooper, Poe, Crane, Cather, Lawrence, Fitzgerald and West
2002 0-7734-7046-8


Repository and Ladies Weekly Museum, Philadelphia 1800-06. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose with Notes on Authors, Signatures, and Sources
2001 0-7734-7499-4
Reference guide to multi-faceted journal.

Royal American Magazine, 1774-75. An Annotated Catalog
2001 0-7734-7405-6
Documenting of the contents of The Royal American Magazine, or Universal Repository of Instruction and Amusement, published in Boston, January 1774-March 1775.

Royal Magazine or, Gentleman’s Monthly Companion, 1759-1769
2007 0-7734-6743-2
Intended to complement the information in volume 8 of the series, this work offers a comprehensive list of prose articles published in the Royal Magazine: or Gentleman's Monthly Companion (London: J. Coote 1759-69). Arranged chronologically by issue.

Rural Magazine or, Vermont Repository ( Rutland: January 1795 - December 1796)
2005 0-7734-6115-9
This collection was, the title page avowed, “devoted to Literary, Moral, Historical, and Political Improvement,” and editor Samuel Williams set out in particular to address the interests of the citizens of Vermont by “collecting and preserving such papers and proceedings” and such original “historical and political documents, literary, civil or ecclesiastical” as would “exhibit to the public a general account and view of the state and progress of society, in this part of the Federal Union (Preface to Number One, Volume One). The analysis of the magazine by Pitcher shows that Williams seems to have set out to model his magazine after Mathew Carey’s American Museum (Philadelphia 1787-92), especially in its divisions into several departments and interest in history and politics, and he used it as a source when he needed to fill his own columns. Williams gave substantial attention to American subjects, important archival materials of Vermont in particular, and, as befitted a “Rural Magazine,” he paid due regard to agricultural, medical, botanical and zoological matters (and subjects touching material culture in other areas).

Sensationalist Literature and Popular Culture in the Early American Republic
2001 0-7734-7572-9
Previous samplers have not swept together the variety that the present editors have gathered, not invited readers to study this literature as part of a reassessment of ‘taste’ within the general populace of the early American republic, especially in the years 1780-1810.

Universal Spectator (London 1728-1746)
2004 0-7734-6409-3
The Universal Spectator was published in 907 weekly issues from October 12, 1728 through February 22, 1746. With the exception of the essay journals conducted by Addison and Steele, there is no literary periodical of the first half of the eighteenth century with a better claim to originality and variety.

Weekly Miscellany Sherborne, 1773-83. Vol. 1
2002 0-7734-7000-X
Contains volumes of a weekly periodical printed and edited in Sherborne by Robert Goadby.

Weekly Miscellany Sherborne, 1773-83. Vol. 2
2002 0-7734-6605-3
Contains volumes of a weekly periodical printed and edited in Sherborne by Robert Goadby.

Wit's Magazine, or Library of Momus ( London: Harrison & Co., 1784-85)
2006 0-7734-5599-X
This catalogue embraces the poetry, stories, anecdotes, and essays of this “Library of Momus” published in seventeen monthly numbers (January 1784 through May 1785). The copious minor verses pieces (rebuses, paradoxes, epitaphs, epigrams, distiches, etc.) in “The Sphinx” have not been indexed by first line or title, but such entries are given short notice, with authors’ names and signatures recorded, in the Register of each monthly part. There are no reviews, political sections or news departments in the magazine. Materials for the magazine were to be selected from the best authors to supplement original contributions in prose and verse, and that articles would not be confined to the humorous or witty.