Subject Area: Literature - Twentieth Century

=Encyclopedia of Jack Vance, 20th Century Science Fiction Writer Volume 3: Numericals Through-Z
2002 0-7734-7224-X
Jack Vance is widely regarded as one of the great writers of imaginative literature of the 20th century. For over 50 years, readers have been enthralled by the richness and exoticism of his imagined worlds. This encyclopedia lists and defines all the people, places, and things invented by Jack Vance for his fiction in English. It provides a ready reference for scholars working with the critical literature on Vance, and makes it possible for readers and critics to identify and locate details in stories that are out-of-print or unavailable, as well as providing a wealth of data for scholars interested in the working of Vance’s creative imagination. The Encyclopedia contains more than 15,600 terms from Vance’s science fiction, fantasy, and detective-adventure riction, and excludes only the work written by Vance as “Ellery Queen.”

Between Two Worlds
2007 0-7734-5347-4
This work is about the narration of nation in the novels of Salman Rushdie and in post-Rushdie Indo-English fiction. It is an attempt to evaluate the articulation of national identity in these narratives as part of their endeavor to forge a postcolonial rupture with colonial history. While the tradition tries to retrieve its right to narrate its own story, the deep contradiction at the heart of these narratives is expressed in their conventions by which the “native” makes his reappearance in the postcolonial context and versions of nation often emerge as the underbelly of their colonial counterparts. While such projections of national identity may be a part of the still continuing colonial cultural legacy, the literary and academic success of such “exotic” ventures play no less significant a role in the production and proliferation of these narratives, mostly published in the West.

Chaos Theory and the Interpretation of Literary Texts the Case of Kurt Vonnegut
1997 0-7734-8553-8
This volume presents the principles articulated in chaos theory as rewarding methods for examining literature. The first section examines the shift from modernism to postmodernism, dating the transition to the bombing of Hiroshima. The second section redefines anterior definitions of chaos and functions as an introduction to the fundamental tenets of chaos theory. The third section deploys chaos theory as a critical approach in its examination of Vonnegut's fiction, resolving a recurrent paradox in existing Vonnegut scholarship: how a body of fiction that repeatedly focuses on death camps, unjust prosecutions, vicious and elitist ideological practices, war, greed, futility, and failure, can remain affirmative.

Concept of the Moment: A Philosophical Tale
2008 0-7734-4987-6
A spiritual autobiography, written in the form of an epistolary novel, which bridges classical and postmodern understandings of subjectivity.

Dead Feel No Pain. A Belarusian Novel of the Second World War by Vasil Bykau
2010 0-7734-3813-0
This book is one of few works by a Soviet writer that provides an honest portrayal of the life of a Soviet foot soldier on the Eastern front in World War II. Aside from the brilliant depiction of life at the front, it reveals how members of Stalin’s secret police transformed themselves into war heroes and began to resurrect Stalinism, following the War. Understandably, Bykau’s novel was res non grata and not published in its entirety until after the demise of the Soviet Union.

Eccentric Individuality in William Kotzwinkle’s the Fan Man, E. T., Doctor Rat, and Other Works of Fiction and Fantasy
2002 0-7734-7310-6
This is the first full-length critical study of an unusually versatile and accomplished author, discussing at length all the most ambitious novels of William Kotzwinkle. In addition to individual analytical examinations of his most prominent work, including The Fan Man and his exceptionally successful adaptation of the film E. T. The study identifies patterns of coherence, recurring themes and subjects, and strategies of comic invention. “If the critical void concerning the career and writings of contemporary author William Kotzwinkle has been inadequately noted, Leon Lewis’s study demonstrates that such attention is overdue. His book goes far toward filling this void, and it should inspire further research into this author’s significant work. . .in a worthy display of the uses of criticism, Lewis briskly and judiciously assumes the promotional role renounced by Kotzwinkle, highlighting the author’s accomplishments and identifying themes, issues, and images that unify his diverse productions into a consistent and conscientious career. . . . Lewis draws delightful examples especially from his subject’s comic writing, and his critical style often enlarges, combines, or riffs on these examples in the style of a humorous yet helpful kindred spirit. . . . Lewis crafts a field of reference as fresh as it is serious, ranging from Rimbaud to Rambo, from the high-cultural icons of Joyce, Valery, Cocteau, and Davenport to Hollywood’s Aliens and a redemptive review of Kotzwinkle’s characterization of Clark Kent ( in his screenplay for Superman III) as ‘everyklutz’. Lewis’s prose is vigorous yet measured, shifting from essential quotation to characteristic paraphrase and commentary, without the theoretical clutter that in many similar studies distracts from the textual subject. . . . This confluence of primary texts, authorial commentary, contemporary review, and a willingness to acknowledge yet question critical assumptions makes Lewis’s ground-breaking study a conscientious foundation on which future scholarship will build.” – Craig White

Ecological Poetics of James Dickey: A Study in How Landscape Shapes the Being of Man
2013 0-7734-4499-8
An intelligent and provocative study exploring how the dynamic between nature and humanity animates many of Dickey’s major works. Its aim is to show the ways in which Dickey seeks to understand how it is possible for beings “to be” and what this means in terms of self-realization. This intelligent study makes a major contribution to our understanding of a major poet and helps us to see James Dickey’s poetic and fictional corpus in an entirely new light.

Editing Rape: Editorial Cleansing in Richard Wright’s Native Son
2015 1-4955-0341-0


Edward Said’s Literary Criticism and Cultural Theory: Deconstructive Readings of Canonical Literature
2015 1-4955-0290-2
This book analyzes how Edward Said’s critical and cultural theory, together with his practical criticism, dismantles the Myth of the Authenticity of canonical, Orientalist and imperialist discourse. Said’s interdisciplinary informs the multiple approaches of this present study. Therefore, the first chapter uses the theoretical and critical, while the second tends to use the textual, biographical and hermeneutical. The third chapter focuses on the historical, as related to phenomenological hermeneutics. Indeed the three chapters, like Said’s work, attempt to employ postcolonial notions and poststructuralist techniques, necessary for “deconstructing” the myth of authenticity of Western discourse and for offering a counter-narrative. The fourth and fifth chapters of this book lend themselves to cultural studies, exactly as Said did in the books discussed in these chapters.

To dismantle the Myth of Authenticity, Edward Said consecutively tackles five interrelated epistemological fields related to imperialism: literary theory and criticism, cultural studies, the media, and ideology and politics. The first two interrelated aspects, researched in the first and second chapters of this book, underline works like The Letters and Shorter Fiction of Joseph Conrad (1964) Beginnings (1975), The World, the Text and the Critic (1983), Culture and Imperialism (1993) and Representations of the Intellectual (1994). Cultural Studies is crystallized in his seminal work Orientalism: Western Conceptions of the Orient (1978), a work accredited by various critics to have inaugurated the whole field of postcolonial studies. His achievement is highlighted in the third chapter of this book. Said extends his search afterwards from critical theory and literary texts and travelogues to the media, as in his Covering Islam (1981), discussed in Chapter Four of this study. This naturally leads Said to focusing on the ideological and political aspects in, for instance, The Question of Palestine (1979), The Politics of Dispossession (1994), The End of the Peace Process (2000) and Culture and Resistance (2003). This aspect is surveyed in Chapter Five, which also links ideology and politics to hybridity and harmony as the only alternative, as is clear in his Parallels and Paradoxes (2002) and Freud and the Non-European (2003).



El Humor En Las Novelas De Gabriel Garcia MÁrquez
2012 0-7734-3063-6
While writers such as Cervantes or Moliere could have written their works with humorous intentions, critics have a tendency to offer complex interpretations of their work that negate some of the fun they have. Nevertheless, there has been a trend in the last few years that authors previously considered pessimistic and tragic have been reimagined as comic writers. Márquez falls into this category, which depicts a difficult Latin American reality with humor and irony. He does this because he cannot fathom the continents actual historical events being portrayed using a realistic approach. As they say, fiction is far more interesting than reality. Because of this he employs hyperbole, employed through his famous technique of “magical realism”, which uses humor to create a release, or catharsis in the readers.

El Neopolicial Latinoamericano y La Crónica Del Chile Actual En Las Novelas De Ramón Díaz Eterovic
2008 0-7734-5189-7
This study examines the detective narrative of Ramón Díaz Eterovic with a particular emphasis on his novels published between 2001 and 2007. The book proposes an original and relevant analysis of Díaz Eterovic’s literary work by positing that his novels confront the dominant discourses of culture, politics, and histiography through the integration of the hard-boiled and so-called social novel. The result is a critical look at Chile’s democratic transition in the post-dictatorial era (1990-2007).

Encyclopedia of Jack Vance, 20th Century Science Fiction Writer Volume 1: A-J
2002 0-7734-7313-0
Jack Vance is widely regarded as one of the great writers of imaginative literature of the 20th century. For over 50 years, readers have been enthralled by the richness and exoticism of his imagined worlds. This encyclopedia lists and defines all the people, places, and things invented by Jack Vance for his fiction in English. It provides a ready reference for scholars working with the critical literature on Vance, and makes it possible for readers and critics to identify and locate details in stories that are out-of-print or unavailable, as well as providing a wealth of data for scholars interested in the working of Vance’s creative imagination. The Encyclopedia contains more than 15,600 terms from Vance’s science fiction, fantasy, and detective-adventure riction, and excludes only the work written by Vance as “Ellery Queen.”

Encyclopedia of Jack Vance, 20th-Century Science Fiction Writer
2002 0-7734-7222-3


Experience of Exile Described by Italian Writers: From Cicero Through Dante and Machiavelli Down to Carlo Levi
2014 0-7734-4507-2
This book identifies the historical and social context of the experience of exile and the degree to which the condition of being exiled influenced literary production of those forced to undergo it.
A fascinating study examining how the legal governmental policy of “exile” can act as a catalyst in the transformation of the person ‘exiled’ from martyr to hero and how the exile process becomes the social –historical instrument that inspires the creative writing of great Italian masterpieces in poetry, rhetoric and philosophy.

How Social Trauma Affects How We Write. Post 9/11 Rhetorical Theory and Composition Pedagogy
2010 0-7734-3695-2
This study explores classic rhetorical traditions and modern composition pedagogies that best suit post-9/11 students. This work utilizes concrete examples and includes a guide for instructors on bringing cultural artifacts into their writing classrooms. This work will appeal to scholars in Pedagogy, New Media, and Literacy Studies as well as Composition and Rhetoric.

Question of Irish Identity in the Writings of William Butler Yeats and James Joyce
1998 0-7734-8237-7
This study seeks to redefine the notions of Irishness and of Irish identity which have been current in cultural and socio-political discourse since the beginning of this century, and secondly, it offers readings of the work of William Butler Yeats and James Joyce which demonstrate their similar negative epistemologies of identity. It is part of the work’s argument that cultural and aesthetic writings have seminal influences on the political infrastructure of the modern nation, and so the book analyzes the political import of cultural and literary movements. In what is possibly the first such project in terms of Irish studies, it offers a critique of essentialist and foundationalist views of Irishness as Gaelic, Catholic, and nationalist, through the application of the theoretical writings of Theodore Adorno, Jacques Derrida, and Emmanuel Levinas. Given the current conflicts of identity in Northern Ireland, this is a timely study which sheds light on the mindsets which create mutually exclusive notions of identity.

Symbolism in the Novels of Tawfiq Al-Hakim and V.s. Naipaul: A Comparative Study of Literary Technique
2012 0-7734-3047-4
This book compares the literary styles of two authors from vastly different cultural and national heritages. Tawfiq Al-Hakim is an Egyptian and V.S. Naipaul is from Trinidad. The cultures are different but their literary techniques bear an affinity to one another. The author showcases how cultural differences are depicted in these novels, while also revealing a shared set of literary conventions utilized by these talented authors. Both draw on mythology and Jungian archetypes which are fertile ground for critical analysis that juxtapose them.

Women, the First World War and the Dramatic Imagination International Essays (1914-1999)
2000 0-7734-7455-2
Part of the significance of this collection of essays comes from its geographical and historical spread: it ranges globally across drama from France, Germany and Australia as well as UK and USA, and it demonstrates the continuing effects of the war o the cultural memories of the disparate nations involved, including Ireland, Germany, Canada and Scotland at the end of the 20th century. It not only makes available original historical research, the results of delving in the police censorship archives in Paris and in the Birmingham Reference Library’s Great War collection, it also demonstrates the fruitfulness of carious critical approaches.