Subject Area: Democracy

Allegorical Story of the Restoration of African Democracy the Strong Versus the Weak
1995 0-7734-8973-8
This work details in allegorical form the shocking story of the results of Europe's entry into the African Continent and creation of the momentum which broke down a complete society that existed in harmony. Areas collapsed after independence, as no arrangements were made by the European peoples to help the newly freed nations. Violence escalated as the military took strong hold of the new governments. Military coups begat civil coups, disrupting any positive changes that had occurred. After each coup d'état, hopes for democracy faded further. This illustrative narrative contains such chapters as 'The Strong Men of the Sahara', 'Scramble for Africa', 'Culture in History', 'Political Correctness', 'Patriotic Rogues', 'Leader Among Wolves', 'Army Coup d'état Versus Civilian Coup d'état', and an Epilogue, Index, and illustrations.

American Promotion of Democracy in Africa, 1988-2000: A Comparison of the Presidential Administrations of George H.W. Bush and William J. Clinton
2009 0-7734-4707-5
This work examines the relationships between U.S. strategic security, trade interests, and democratic enlargement in Africa. The author demonstrates that idiosyncratic presidential actions shaped the outcomes of the policy to export democratic ideals to Africa.

American Tradition of Liberty, 1800-1860. From Jefferson to Lincoln
1986 0-88946-101-5
The only work to deal with the study of the meaning of freedom during the period in question. Describes the beliefs of 20-plus political philosophers, clergymen and theologians, collectivists, individualists, anarchists, and pro- and anti-slavery polemicists in a series of intellectual sketches held together by a common theme: what did the literate and articulate antebellum American mean when he used the words liberty and freedom?

Analysis of the Economic Democracy Reforms in Sweden
2004 0-7734-6476-X
Explores the background to, and impact made by, one of the most ambitious and controversial policy innovations ever attempted in Sweden, namely the economic democracy reforms. The Wage-Earner Funds proposal, advanced to strengthen the celebrated Rehn-Meidner economic model, in addition to promoting employee influence over their working lives, encouraged theoretical and predictive texts. This book draws upon a substantial Swedish-language literature, together with over fifty interviews with leading actors involved with the issue. It further evaluates the concept of collective funds as a policy instrument to meet multiple objectives, and comments upon the future viability of this approach.

Anti-Primitivism and the Decline of the West the Social Cost of Cultural Ignorance Volume Two: The Failure of Christianity, Progress, and Democracy
1993 0-7734-9857-5
The work explains that the West obliterated primitive civilizations everywhere in the names of Christianity and Progress. They were not exterminated -- or better, absorbed -- in the name of democracy, because the latter was for the white man only and was thought too exotic for the primitive to grasp. From a scholarly point of view, if the idea of Progress has failed, it will eventually cause the failure of democracy. That idea has to be dealt with on at least three levels, i.e., the Third World where there are almost no prospects; Russia and eastern Europe where success with a free market economy is dubious; and, finally, here at home where, under democracy and diverse ethnic and religious groups, we seem unable to solve basic and vital issues. Any librarian whose collection includes Oswald Spengler's The Decline of the West and Edward Said's Orientalism will want to add the present work.

Anti-Primitivism and the Decline of the West. The Social Cost of Cultural Ignorance; The Primitive and the Supernatural
1993 0-7734-9855-9
Explains that the West obliterated primitive civilizations everywhere in the names of Christianity and Progress. They were not exterminated -- or better, absorbed -- in the name of democracy, because the latter was for the white man only and was thought too exotic for the primitive to grasp. From a scholarly point of view, if the idea of Progress has failed, it will eventually cause the failure of democracy. That idea has to be dealt with on at least three levels, i.e., the Third World where there are almost no prospects; Russia and eastern Europe where success with a free market economy is dubious; and, finally, here at home where, under democracy and diverse ethnic and religious groups, we seem unable to solve basic and vital issues.

Beyond Democracy to Post-Democracy. Conceiving a Better Model of Governance to Supercede Democracy
2004 0-7734-6216-3
Contrary to the belief of many contemporaries, democracy is as evil and good as non-democracy. This sounds shocking, since democracy (of whatever version) enjoys its triumphant moment in our age, to the effect that there is a widespread belief of democracy, unlike non-democracy, as most congenial to the celebration (not condemnation) of difference. This democratic/non-democratic dichotomy therefore privileges democracy as the highest political achievement of human civilization, such that everywhere there have been endless discussions of how and why different societies and cultures are to adopt it, all in the celebration of difference in our time.

Dr.Baofu, in this wide-ranging work, shows how and why the democratic idea of difference becomes the democratic mystique of difference. His inquiry reveals, in the end, how and why democracy privileges itself by an untenable dichotomy and is essentially contingent on the historical needs of society and the dominant themes of culture in our time. Democracy will not last (to be superseded by what Dr.Baofu originally called “post-democracy”), just as aristocracy before it could not. The difference is that we believe in our version of historical destiny now, just as those before us believed in theirs then, and those after us will believe in theirs in the future.

As an anti-hero of our time, Baofu’s critique against the sacrosanct idea of democracy earns few friends and wins few hearts, in an age where the democratic idea reigns supreme as its god.

Beyond Democracy to Post-Democracy: Conceiving a Better Model of Governance to Supercede Democracy
2004 0-7734-6218-X
Contrary to the belief of many contemporaries, democracy is as evil and good as non-democracy. This sounds shocking, since democracy (of whatever version) enjoys its triumphant moment in our age, to the effect that there is a widespread belief of democracy, unlike non-democracy, as most congenial to the celebration (not condemnation) of difference. This democratic/non-democratic dichotomy therefore privileges democracy as the highest political achievement of human civilization, such that everywhere there have been endless discussions of how and why different societies and cultures are to adopt it, all in the celebration of difference in our time.

Dr.Baofu, in this wide-ranging work, shows how and why the democratic idea of difference becomes the democratic mystique of difference. His inquiry reveals, in the end, how and why democracy privileges itself by an untenable dichotomy and is essentially contingent on the historical needs of society and the dominant themes of culture in our time. Democracy will not last (to be superseded by what Dr.Baofu originally called “post-democracy”), just as aristocracy before it could not. The difference is that we believe in our version of historical destiny now, just as those before us believed in theirs then, and those after us will believe in theirs in the future.

As an anti-hero of our time, Baofu’s critique against the sacrosanct idea of democracy earns few friends and wins few hearts, in an age where the democratic idea reigns supreme as its god.

Building Local Democracy in Barcelona
2004 0-7734-6280-5
There is an abundant literature on the Spanish transition to democracy as viewed from the level of the Spanish national polity and of the national political elites. The view from civil society and from particular localities is much less explored. This book fills this gap by seeking to understand the process of democratisation from the local level, the level of politics closest to the ordinary citizen. Through an empirical case study of politics in the city of Barcelona, this book sheds light on the relationship between democratisation and citizen participation in associations and social movements within civil society. The focus is on both the process of democratisation and the outcome of that process, namely, the kind of democracy established.

At the core of the book are three questions. First, what role did citizen participation play in the process of democratisation? Second, what was the impact of citizen participation on the kind of democracy established? And finally, what are the consequences of trying to create a more participatory democracy within the shell of capitalist, liberal democracy? The book answers these questions by drawing on a variety of sources and methods including extensive interviews with key local political actors.

Campus Hate-Speech Codes, Natural Rights, and Twentieth Century. Atrocities Revised and Expanded Edition
1999 0-7734-8847-2
The essays in this volume address the current problems posed by hate-speech. Expressed are concerns in which there is a vital need to restore the standard of civility by which productive discourse is sustained. As we are now confronted by the problem of what may be done, consistent with our constitutional principles and political habits, to discourage if not even suppress irresponsible speech on campuses and elsewhere, this volume presents commentary on the way back from individualism to a proper sense of community.

Constructing ‘ England ’ in the Fourteenth Century. A Postcolonial Interpretation of Middle English Romance
2010 0-7734-1293-X
Explores how narratives aided in the construction of a national identity in England in the late Middle Ages. Throughout the Middle Ages England was the site of confluent cultures, English, Scandinavian, and Continental, and this work examines how social, cultural and political encounters, particularly in the centuries following the Norman Conquest, influenced constructions of Englishness.

Daniel Warner and the Paradox of Religious Democracy in 19th Century America
1998 0-7734-8249-0
“Fudge’s work raises important questions and implications for American religious historiography. In the first place his study shifts and enlarges the bi-polar historiography that has dominated the study of American Protestantism, particularly in its conservative and Evangelical forms. . . . demonstrates that other polarities defined the work of significant leaders such as Daniel S. Warner. This in itself makes Fudge’s work an important historiographical step. . . . a solid foundation of thorough acquaintance with the scholarship in the area coupled with careful research in primary source material. Fudge has brought to light fugitive and, in some instances, highly charged materials that bear in important ways on the history of an American religious movement. He handles these materials with unusual sensitivity and a light touch.” – Merle D. Strege

Demise of American Democracy: Explaining the Crisis and What to Do About It
2016 1-4955-0439-5
“In this important book, Dr. Durland draws on his vast research and experience to make the case for the danger to democracy from our present political climate. It is a compelling case, presented fairly and clearly. His personal stories add unexpected depth and breadth and fascination.”
-Dr. Linda Seger,
Author and Consultant




Democracy - An Alternate View
2004 0-7734-6439-5
This book provides an examination of democracy in a different light, specifically in the author’s identification, explication and elaboration of three fundamental criteria. These three fundamental criteria of democracy and democratic practice often discounted or simply disregarded are: 1) democracy is a form of human activity relevant not just for the conventionally political state but also, as much or more, for other social contexts of various magnitudes and functions; 2) democracy is a practice of positive freedom, incorporating negative freedom but subsuming the latter within the project of the mutual empowerment of human beings in accordance with humanistic values; 3) democracy is embodied most adequately in a communally (not merely socially) cooperative model that is different, in most important respects, from unitary, adversary or deliberative models (herein subjected to critique).

Explicit analyses are provided of a variety of socio-political concepts that are philosophically integrated with these criteria, concepts such as representation, participation, elitism, preferences, interests, the common good, human needs and human rights, negative freedom and positive freedom, justice, equality, difference, legitimacy, obligation and loyalty. The author’s own model of democracy – acknowledged to be unrealizable at the level of the nation-state (where adversary quasi-democracy is most practicable) – is explicated, at the same time, dealing with problems and prospects for it and emphasizing its importance for the social activity of human beings in the immediacy of their lifeworld.

Democracy and Race in Brazil, Britain and the United States Reaching for Higher Ground
1997 0-7734-8729-8
This study examines the relationship between democracy and the politics of race from a cross-national comparative perspective, examining specifically how Black people fare in the political systems of Britain, Brazil, and the United States. The book addresses questions about the role of race in the development of democratic ideology, theory and systems of governance, and the levels of difference and commonality in the political experiences of people of African descent in the diaspora. Traditional tools of comparative political science are used to examine the role of race and race-related issues in each nation, and each nation-state chapter traces the historical relationship between the development of democracy and the politics of race. The study identifies the processes and factors that are the result of the specific national or political differences and those that may be the result of systemic factors that commonly occur in democratic contexts. This study makes an important contribution to the field of political science, and the sub-fields of comparative politics, race/ethnic politics, and will be of interest to the related fields of sociology and history.

Democracy and the Philippine Media, 1983-93
2000 0-7734-7816-7
This study examines the relationships between the Philippine media, class power, and the state. It focuses particularly on the economic and political actors and agencies, including the press, which have promoted or hindered democratization in the Philippines during the decade 1983-1993. It argues that although the role of the Philippine press has been considerable, it has been inextricably bound to the interests of the ruling elites who have disproportionate control over mainstream media agendas.

Democracy and the Role of the Haitian Media
2001 0-7734-7314-9
This study includes an explanation of the origins of the exiled Haitian press, the revolutionary character of the Haitian-American press, historical development of media in Haiti, and the relationship between media and the government from 1986 to 1999. It also contains a review of the literature and a theoretical base developed after reviewing the political systems of the press. It uses this most-difficult-case scenario to illustrate the changing pattern media may take in helping to create a democratic society.

Development of Freedom in America and France in the Age of Their Revolutions. The Role of Franklin, Lafayette, Jefferson, Washington, Napoleon, Tocqueville, and Others
2010 0-7734-1444-4


Electoral Conditions of Economic Cooperation. How Democracies Select Their Leaders Affects Their Foreign Policy
2010 0-7734-3764-9
Examines whether electoral rules impact the level of multilateralism, or cooperative policies, that countries pursue. Specifically, this research looks at International Governmental Organization membership, foreign aid donations, and trade tariffs to determine whether some democracies, because of the degree of representativeness afforded by their political institutions, pursue such preferences to a greater extent than others.

Evolution of the Liberal Democratic State with a Case Study of Latinos in San Antonio, Texas
2003 0-7734-6674-6
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title

This study addresses several unresolved questions concerning the theory of the state through the use of a nonlinear dynamical theoretical model. This model, sometimes referred to as ‘Chaos Theory,’ identifies the principal structural reasons for the state’s autonomy even though the state is a creation of the dynamical social relations of any given society. Most importantly, Chaos Theory is used to explore how and why the state evolves throughout history. Although the theoretical model is at the heart of this volume’s discussion, the evolution of the local state in San Antonio, Texas provides the case study for explication of the model. The effects of the state’s evolution on the social and political lives of Latinos highlight the case study.

Explaining the Failure of Democracy in the Democratic Republic of Congo
2005 0-7734-6034-9
This work traces the remote origins of Congo’s current national predicament and the people’s protracted quest for democracy and social justice. The first part of the book provides an account of the political history of modern Congo which sets the context for the second part, an in-depth discussion of the interplay of internal and external forces in Congo and their impact on the politics of democratic transition in the country from 1990 through the early 2000s. Arguing that recent popular resistance against political dictatorship in Congo builds on a long-standing tradition, the author offers critical analysis of post-Cold War configuration of pro-democracy forces (or the appearance thereof) inside the country and at the global level, which compelled President Mobutu to inaugurate political reform in April 1990. Against this backdrop, he assesses the roles played by the Sovereign National Conference (SNC), the transitional institutions established by the SNC, and the Sacred Union of opposition, all of which emerged during the early 1990s in response to the government’s decision to lift the ban on partisan political activity. With particular reference to the 1996–97 war, which toppled Mobutu’s regime, and the 1998–2003 war against the Kabila regime, the author analyses the events leading up to internationalization of Congo’s transition crisis and the roles played by principal actors from the country’s rival political factions and their international allies in the two conflicts. The book concludes with cautious optimism about the prospects for democracy and sustainable economic development in the post-Mobutu Congo and an overview of some of the practical steps that must be taken by the Congolese people and the global community in order to realize these objectives.

Globalism and the Obsolescence of the State
1999 0-7734-7968-6
This work explores topics such as: globalism, justice, and federalism; State sovereignty; world community; violence and coercion; and designing social institutions.

How Political Singers Facilitated the Spanish Transition to Democracy, 1960-1982
2007 0-7734-5417-9
This book explores the politics of identity in works by popular male singer-songwriters Víctor Manuel and Joaquín Sabina and in those by well-known female political singer Ana Belén between the years 1968 and 1982. It examines the connections that existed between their works and the broader Spanish context of the Transition (1960-1982) to democracy. It also explores the representations of Spanish national identity – with special reference to gender differences – that appeared in their texts between 1968 and 1982. It compares the relationship that existed between representations of the nation and national identity in their musical work and Francoist notions of Spain and Spanishness as constructed in different hegemonic discourses. Finally, this book examines some of the most relevant roles that Spanish canción de autor/a, cantautores and cantantes políticos fulfilled at the time of the Transition, especially among different anti-Francoist collectives.

Identity Politics as an Alternative to Conservatism and Social Democracy: The Emergence of Neo-Volkism in Advanced Western Societies
2011 0-7734-1393-6
This study argues that an emerging politics of identity is gradually replacing the politics of interests that has traditionally dominated the political arena in advanced industrial societies. It updates the literature on new political cleavages with a perspective that emphasizes both national patriotism and sub-cultural defense, and backs up its analysis with a large body of evidence concerning ongoing political conflicts.

Interest Groups and Lobbying in United States and Comparative Perspectives. Essays in Ethics, Institutional Pluralism, Regulation, and Management
2009 0-7734-4692-3
This collection of original research on interest groups and lobbying around the world offers the most wide-ranging set of scholarly analyses of organized interest behavior available to date. While there is an enormous amount of research already available on groups in the American political process, and a smaller though still sizeable body dealing with interest representation in the other Western democracies, this collection provides scholars with perspectives on an unprecedented range of nations.

Interviews with African American Women Engaged in Local Indiana Politics: A Grassroots of American Civic Democracy
2015 1-4955-0371-2
“This book clarifies and celebrates the role of African-American women through their democratic engagement in the United States…the thorough archival research, extensive references, and compelling interviews provide an organized rendering of interesting content that will be accessible to any reader seeking knowledge and insights about the valuable voices of the women who are the focus of this book."
–Frances Yates, Library Director,
Indiana University East



Is There a Global Right to Democracy?
2012 0-7734-2593-4
This is an expansive study of what we call “The Global Right to Democracy.” The idea gestates from a late 20th century reading of Immanuel Kant. This book is the first comprehensive look at the intersection of neo-Kantian theory and democratization programs undertaken by international organizations and non-governmental bodies in post-conflict and fragile states. The features of this new, assumed right, seem to graft onto international law---and thus hand over to international agencies—methods of protecting and effecting ‘democracy’ in its broadest definition. The consequence seems to be an alteration of traditional notions of international behavior and a challenge to the primacy of state sovereignty.

Jews in Leipzig, Germany Under Nazism, Communism, and Democracy
2011 0-7734-1506-8
A thorough examination of the enormous differences between the attitudes toward Jews of the First Republic, the Third Reich and the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany, the last regime of which has not been studied with the depth, due not least to the relatively recent opening of sources.

John Rawls’ Theory of Institutionalism: The Historical Movement Toward Liberal Democracy
2009 0-7734-3872-6
This work develops institutionalism into a normative and philosophical theory with the ability to explain the historical development of institutions. It contributes to Rawlsian scholarship by arguing that Rawls’ theory of justice is an institutionalist justification of liberal democracy from the internal perspective of a democratic citizen.

Key Problems for Democracy in Nigeria: Credible Elections, Corruption, Security, Governance, and Political Parties
2010 0-7734-3591-3
This work is a detailed study of the issues plaguing good governance in Nigeria. In addition to its analysis, the book offers prescriptions for establishing and sustaining effective state leadership.

Liberal Democracy and the Bible
1992 0-7734-9154-6
This bold and innovative series of essays addresses the encounter between the biblical exegesis and liberal democratic thought. Explores how early modern liberal democratic thinkers such as Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, and Kant employ the Bible in the development of their political theories. The introductory essay focuses on the tension between Reason, Revelation, and liberal democracy, and a concluding essay proposes a substantive method for serious reflection about the issues.

Limits of Democracy and the Post-colonial nation state. Mali’s Democratic Experiment Falters, While Jihad and Terrorism Grow in the Sahara
2016 1-4955-0475-1
This book analyzes international politics in the Sahara, describing the Mali crisis and the coup d’état of March 2012 that lead to the collapse of the State. Themes include the weaknesses of African States, democratic governance, decentralization and political legitimacy: terrorism and Islamic fundamentalism; corporate competition for cocaine, hashish, weapons, oil, gas, and uranium; droughts and demography; and poverty of Mali’s vulnerable women, children and refugees - victims of political instability.

Making Russian Democracy Work Social Capital, Economic Development, and Democratization
2000 0-7734-7803-5
This book explores the myriad factors at work in the process of post-Communist democratization in Russia, with an explicit focus on the role performed by social capital and socio-economic development. Using both an historical approach and quantitative evidence from across Russia’s 89 regions, this work explores the role performed by economic development and social capital leading to the democratization of the Soviet Union and in contributing to the consolidation of democracy in contemporary Russia. The results offer some grounds for a guardedly optimistic assessment of the prospects for making democracy work in Russia. The work contributes to the body of literature on comparative regime transitions, post-Communist politics, and to the study of democratic governance in general.

Nationalistic Ideologies, Their Policy Implications and the Struggle for Democracy in African Politics
1991 0-7734-9696-3
This study of African politics and public policies is an effort to understand the dynamism of African politics from within its own internal constraint. The emphasis is on the analysis of the local conditions because dependency theory has already been exhausted in the studies of the political economy.

Policy Making and Education Reform in the Development of Latin American Social Democracy. The Role of the Left in Brazil and Chile
2011 0-7734-1433-9
What is social democracy in Latin America and what has been its impact on public policy? This work uses case studies to examine the approaches of three Latin American governments to educational policy.

Political Life of a Public Employee Labor Union Regional Union Democracy
2001 0-7734-7672-5
This study examines the effects of the internal organizational structure on the actual process of decision-making on such issues as the raising of the per-capita tax, political endorsement of candidates running for public office, and the hiring and direction of permanent staff; the electoral process; the relationship between the regional union and its local unions and the national union. This work not only fills the void in scholarly publications on union political lives, but also contributes to our understanding of the effects of structure on process.

Politics of HIV/ AIDS and Implications for Democracy in Kenya
2006 0-7734-5649-X
Taking the responses against HIV/AIDS as a political arena for the interaction between the state and civil society in Kenya, this book explores the relationship between the resulting mobilization against HIV/AIDS and the ongoing process of democratic consolidation in Kenya. Evidence from the country’s mobilization against HIV/AIDS in the early part of the 21st century reveals an explicit positive impact on the buildup of democracy in the country. This is mainly as a result of emergent institutional mechanisms in the response against the pandemic. While HIV/AIDS has been widely portrayed as a negative force to reverse political gains made in many sub-Sahara African countries in recent years, this book concludes that mobilization against this human catastrophe is inadvertently contributing to the process of democratic consolidation in Kenya. The book advances the ‘theory of democratic enrichment’ which makes the case that mobilization against an external shock can serve as an ‘enhancement’ as opposed to an ‘interruption’ for democratic consolidation.

Preserving a Good Political Order and a Democratic Republic. Reflections From Philosophy, Great Thinkers, Popes, and America's Founding Era
1998 0-7734-8487-6
Examines what the role of the state or political order should be, how the state should treat its citizens, building its analysis substantially around the reflections of great political thinkers, including papal thought, the reasoning and conclusions of realist philosophical texts, and more contemporary commentators. Analyzes not only what elements are needed to build good, stable political orders generally and democratic republics specifically, but what factors have historically caused their decline and fall.

Promoting Democracy in the Post-Soviet Region
2002 0-7734-7148-0
This work examines the differences between the two main laws that fund democratization activities in the post-Soviet regions. Analysis of the program funded by the Freedom Support Act reveals the extent to which the State Department relies n private organizations to implement democratization programs, and suggests that democratization programs provide financial benefits primarily to American organizations. Then, with a combined issue network/statist argument, this study explains that an issue network, organized by the State Department to give the foreign policy community an active mission in the post-cold war environment, was the impetus behind the creation of programs like Community Connections. Because Community Connections have never faced financial or political scandal, and taps into an American priority of spreading democracy and capitalism, evaluation of CC was irrelevant to program expansion and continuation.

Prospects for Political Stability in a Democratic Iraq: A Study of the Clusters of Conflict
2009 0-7734-3870-X
Clusters composed of a democratic state surrounded by autocratic states may be particularly conflict prone. If so, were Iraq to become an established democracy in the midst of mostly nondemocratic contiguous neighbors, we may expect increased conflict within the cluster. The current study, using COW and Polity data, analyzes 142 clusters over an extended period and finds support for the proposition that heterogeneous clusters with autocracies surrounding a democracy tend to be conflictual.

Right to Democracy in International Law
2003 0-7734-6852-8


Role of Charismatic Leadership in Ending the Cold War: The Presidencies of Boris Yeltsin, Vaclav Havel, and Helmut Kohl
2010 0-7734-4711-3
This book modifies Weber’s conception of legitimate authority to examine the connections between charismatic authority and radical societal change. It argues that the form and duration of the emerging charismatic authority depends on both longer-term variables (the existing political system and culture) and more transient ones (a suitable leader; media influence; the international perspective; and specific events sparking radical change). The hypothesis is tested using three case studies: Yeltsin in Russia, Havel in Czechia and Kohl in Germany, primarily between 1989 and 1991.

Two Religious Critiques of Liberal Democracy: A Comparison of the Political Theories of Mohandas Karamchad Gandhi and Franklin I. Gamwell
2015 1-4955-0305-4
To underscore the moral crisis that plagues liberal democracy, the author seeks answers by drawing from both Western and Asian thought in this outstanding analysis in political ethics. Starting with Gamwell’s theory, which is grounded on God and offers a common goal for political community and establishes a firm ground for morality and political ethics the author advances and reformulates Gamwell’s theory, using the insights and resources provided by Gandhi bringing a global dimension to this original critique.

When is Democracy Normal? The Relation to Demography, Market Economy and Globalization
2008 0-7734-5238-9
The author provides a new definition of democracy—one permitting the continuous achievement of a more equal distribution of political power—before discussing the main conditions (economic development, the political process, external influences) responsible for democratic transition and development. Arguing that post-modernization theory can explain globalization, he builds on the democratic peace thesis, contending that globalization is a function of democracy. Bu how does this impact the social justice continuum?

William Penn, James Madison and the Historical Crisis in American Federalism
2000 0-7734-7698-9
This study alerts American citizens to the danger of the demise of American government, as it was conceived by the founders and framers. The books traces the rise of the American nation and its unique governmental creation – a delicate balance of republicanism, democracy, federalism and constitutionalism. It examines William Penn’s attempt to establish a “Holy Experiment” an utopian yet practical government, and then the new constititution which James Madison called the “American Experiment”. The book follows the daily steps of the deliberations and conversations of the participants in the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The study culminates in an examination of the third attempt at confederacy in American and new efforts to replace national government with a controlling global economy.