Subject Area: Biology

Case for New Paradigms in Cell Biology and in Neurobiology
1991 0-7734-9690-4
Based on observations in living cells and the laws of solid geometry and thermodynamics, the structure of the living cell has been reexamined. The cytoskeleton, the endoplasmic reticulum, the nuclear pores, and the apparent trilaminar appearance of the cell membranes, have been shown to be artifacts of electron microscopy. The synapses and neuroglial cells have been reexamined, and the case has been made out for entirely new paradigms, with consideration of the reactions to this fundamental reappraisal.

Essay on the Demographic Imperative Non-Linear Theory of the Growth of Humankind
1999 0-7734-3258-2
Of all global problems world population growth is the most significant. The growth of the number of people expresses the sum outcome of all economic, social and cultural activities that comprise human history. For a phenomenological description of the global demographic process the author developed an original non-linear mathematical model for explanation of the global demographic process. The demographic transition – a transition to a stabilized world population of some 14 billion in the foreseeable future is to be determined by the inherent pattern of systemic growth of an open system, rather than by the lack of resources. The demographic revolution, a fundamental change in the paradigm of our development will be accompanied by basic changes in the age profile that never before happened since the origin of humankind. The impact of this rapid transformation on our values is critical for understanding many of the critical problems now facing the world.

Heresy of Oedipus and the Mind/ Mind Split. A Study of the Biocultural Origins of Civilization
1995 0-7734-8854-5
The nature/nurture controversy, sometimes known as the evolution/environment controversy, seems to have trickled down into the information systems of the vernacular world as an unfortunate rift between duelling scholarly camps. The Biocultural Paradigm is offered as a model that transcends both camps, by recognizing the neuro-biological origins of human development and by delineating exactly how and when sociological influences can and cannot affect those neuro-biological invariants. The Biocultural Paradigm is established by using existing discoveries in evolutionary neuro-biology and Selection Theory. It is composed of five proto-cultural models ("biocultures") which correspond to the five evolutionary centers of our neurological structures. Each bioculture then is formed by the cultural manifestation of the primacy of certain neurological traits over others, eventually (through the habitual repetition of the primacy of certain neurological links at the expense of others), these individual traits become societal ones; thus forming the socio-biological basis for the Biocultural Paradigm. The sociological evidence is founded primarily upon sociolinguistic grounds, by analyzing the relationships between the literary remnants of certain cultures and their corresponding social, political, and religious structures. The literary evidence is examined as it elucidates a neural map of cortical activity (thereby offering clues as to the biocultural slant of the group), while the social, political, and religious systems are examined for evidence of neurological predispositions that manifest externally as cultural substitution systems.