Zambia and the Decline of Kaunda 1984-1998

Author: Chan, Stephen
Year:2000
Pages:208
ISBN:0-7734-7504-4
978-0-7734-7504-5
Price:179.95
This collection of essays spans a 15 year period of close observation of Zambia, and its first leader, Kenneth Kaunda. It begins with the 1984 Zambian elections and continues to Kaunda’s accusation of treason by the Chiluba government in 1998. An eyewitness series of events as they happened, the volume is a contemporary chronicle not paralleled elsewhere.

Reviews

“I believe that the usefulness of this collection of essays on Kaunda will, no doubt, be significant. . . . it is certainly time that such a tool for research into African political development is made available.” – Abiodun Onadipe

“. . . an important scholarly resource. . . . Prof. Chan’s writings will no doubt have greater impact on the younger generation of scholars now and in the future. His fascinating mind and his impressive example has had the deepest factor in shaping the scholarly outlook of those he taught.” – Cirino Hiteng Ofuho

Table of Contents

Table of Contents:
Foreword; Preface
Part I: The Decline of Kaunda: Essays of Praise and Complaint 1983-1989
1. Introduction
2. X for the Eagle
3. Zambia’s Foreign Policy – Elitism and Power
4. Humanism, Intellectuals and the Left in Zambia
5. Kaunda as International Casualty
6. Kaunda and Southern Africa: Image and reality in foreign policy
7. Presidentialism in Lusaka and Harare
Part II 1991-1999
8. Prospects for the 1991 Elections in Zambia
9. Democracy in Southern Africa: The 1990 Elections in Zimbabwe and 1991 Elections in Zambia
10. Democratic Zambia – A Mid-Term Report
11. Zambia and the Democratic Experiment
12. Troubled Pluralisms: Pondering an Indonesian moment in Zimbabwe and Zambia
Postscript; Index