Representation of the Cultural Revolution in Chinese Films by the Fifth Generation Filmmakers

Author: Ming-May Jessie Chen and Mazharul Haque
Year:2007
Pages:220
ISBN:0-7734-5511-6
978-0-7734-5511-5
Price:179.95
This book examines historical events related to the Chinese Cultural Revolution between 1966 and 1976, focusing mainly on the work of the so-called Fifth Generation filmmakers who experienced the Cultural Revolution first hand and produced movies about it, though attention is also given to films from Third, Fourth, and Sixth Generation directors. Assuming that fictional films can be seen as an agent enhancing our historical understanding, this study, employing an interdisciplinary approach involving history, philosophy, literature, and ideology, and using the Chinese Cultural Revolution as an example, attempts to examine how such a theory of film might fit into a philosophy of history, while also aiming to find places where film and history intersect.

Reviews

"... Drawing on the more recent ‘relativist’ work of Hadyn White, [the authors] ably demonstrate how the intersection of history and cinema in the work of Chinese Fifth Generation filmmakers can be discussed in terms of the generic and narrative categories of tragedy, comedy, and irony.” –Professor Phillip Gentile, University of Southern Mississippi

Table of Contents

Foreword by Phillip Gentile
Acknowledgements
I. Introduction
II. The Cultural Revolutions and the Chinese Film Industry
III. The Fifth Generation Directors and Their Films
IV. The Intersections of Film and History
V. Film as Historical Evidence
VI. Conclusion
Bibliography
Index