Islam and War. The Disparity between the Technological Normative Evolution of Modern War and the doctrine of Jihad

Author: Dizboni, A. G.
Year:2011
Pages:368
ISBN:0-7734-1513-0
978-0-7734-1513-3
Price:239.95
The author examines jihad from an historical discursive perspective, taking account of the economic and cultural contexts in which the doctrine first developed in Islamic law, as well as the doctrine’s applicability to international law and relations.

Named for the Law and Society Association's 2012 Herbert Jacob Book Prize.

Reviews

“…deserving of attention and study by scholars of international relations, international law, and international security, and by all those interested in the strengthening of a world anchored in the United Nations Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.” -Bertrand G. Ramcharan, Geneva Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

Table of Contents

Foreword

Acknowledgments

List of Tables and Figures

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER ONE

1. Literature Review

(a) Religion and just war Traditions in Western Culture Christianization of just war
Modern Secularization of the Christian Doctrine of Just War
(b) Islam and War?
Theory or Doctrine?
Islamic Doctrine of International Relations
The Normative Crisis in Modern Schools of International
Relations
Islamization of Modern International Relations
The Concept of Jihad
Jus ad Bellum in Classical Islam
(c) Contemporary Muslim Scholars’ Criticism of Classical Jihad in Islam

The Modernist Criticisms of Jihad

2. THE RESEARCH QUESTION

3. EPISTEMOLOGICAL CONSIDERATION

4. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATION

(a) Strategy of Falsification
(b) Choice of Authors
(c) Definition of Concepts
(d) Data Collection

CHAPTER TWO

1. Context

(a) Economic advantages of Jihad for the Classical Muslim State
(b) Culture of War (Arab Attitudes towards War before and during Early Islam)
Pre-Islamic Arab Attitudes towards War
The Islamic Era and Discourse on War
(c) Military Conquests
The First Stage
The Second Stage

2. Siar or Classical Muslim International Law

(a) Definition
(b) Sovereignty
(c) Dualism or Monism?
(d) The Source of Obligation and the Subject in Muslim International Law
(e) Main Sources of Classical Muslim Law
(f) The Concept of Jihad in Classical Muslim International Law
(g) A Synopsis of Major Concepts in the Doctrine of Jihad

Conclusion

CHAPTER THREE

1. The Classical Muslim Paradigm

(a) Epistemological Characteristics
(b) Methodological Tenets of the Classical Paradigm
2. New Epistemological and Methodological Approaches

(a) Historical Background
(b) Typology of Intellectual Trends and the Definition of Muslim
Modernism
Modernist Methodology

3. Contemporary Critics of the Doctrine of Jihad Conclusion

CHAPTER FOUR

1. Military Revolutions before the Twentieth Century

Netherlands
(a) Impact of the Industrial Revolution on the Costs of War
(b) Total War
Military Strategy and Civilian Mobilization in War
Definition of Total War
Human and Economic Costs of the Great War: A Case
Study
Direct Costs of World War I
Indirect Costs of World War I

2. Nuclear Weapons

3. The Dilemma of Rationality in Classical Jihad

(a) Replacement of Land by Trade and the Reduced Utility of War

Conclusion

CHAPTER FIVE

1. The Evolution of the Discourse on War

(a) War Discourse since Greek Antiquity
(b) Discourse on War in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance Era
(c)War Advocacy in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries Peace Is Corrupting
(d) Anti-war Discourse in the Nineteenth Century and Thereafter
The Rise and Dominance of Anti-war Discourse in the Aftermath of WWI

2. The Change in Attitudes toward War after World War II

3. Evolution of the Use of Force in Modern International Law

4. Normative Integration of Muslim States

(a) Relations between the Ottoman and Persian Empires and the European States
(b) Diplomatic Relations among Muslim States Themselves
(c) The Emergence of Contemporary Nation-States in the Muslim World

5. Normative Contexts of Jihad: A Comparison

Conclusion

CONCLUSION

CHRONOLOGY OF THE MUSLIM WORLD UP TO 1924

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDEX