Building a Framework of Security for Southeast Europe and the Black Sea Region. A Challenge Facing NATO

Author: Peterson, James W.
Year:2013
Pages:268
ISBN:0-7734-4517-X
978-0-7734-4517-8
Price:199.95
Security issues in Southeast Europe are tricky because the region has been in turmoil for many years. North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) stands out as a likely counterweight to the local problems that have plagued the region, and could serve as a stabilizing force. The book focuses on counter-terrorism measures that can be taken in Southeast Europe, specifically by NATO allies in the region.

Reviews

“Southeastern Europe (also known as the Balkans), and the Black Sea have been a major historical powder keg for Europe, where wars between empires, multi-national alliances, and separate Balkan states frequently started and finished without resolving the ethnic, religious, and political reasons which ignited the conflicts…This book discusses the existing unresolved issues in the post-Soviet and post-Yugoslavian space that may present potential danger for the peace in the regions in question, augmented by the acts of terrorism after September 11th, 2001… Combined with the Iranian religious and nuclear ambitions and the ambiguous Arab Spring, this situation calls for changing NATO strategy in the region to prevent extremists’ access to other NATO and partnership for Peace member countries.”
Dr. Panayot Karagyozov,
Sofia University

“The literature on the impact of NATO expansion seems more focused on other areas and concentrates on potential Russian responses. This study concentrates on an area where political interaction among new NATO members reveals many outstanding contentious issues. It is a pioneering effort.”
Prof. James Larry Taulbee, Emory University

“The monograph is the only work to examine the expansion of NATO into the Balkans, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia, specifically the regions of Southeastern Europe and the Black Sea, not from the perspective of the NATO countries, but from the vantage point of the new member states and the potential member states.”
Prof. Daniel E. Miller,
University of West Florida