Subject Area: Thanatology

Ars Moriendi Manuals, Paintings, and Funeral Rituals in Late Medieval Europe and Sixteenth Century Mexico ( New Spain ): Learning How to Live by Learning How to Die
Bastante, Pamela
2016 1-4955-0477-8 356 pages
The Ars moriendi manual, which had been popular because of its brevity and concision, was chosen by the Franciscan Order as an essential text for promoting the Christian doctrine in New Spain and for re-organizing the funerary practices therein. This book identifies the official and unofficial discourses of the Church regarding Salvation and the funerary practices of New Spain that link the Old World to the New.


A History of a Jewish Burial Society: An Examination of Secularization
Schneider, Mareleyn
1991 0-7734-9950-4 350 pages
This work has two subjects: a monograph dealing with one of the most ancient Jewish acts, acquiring a cemetery plot; and one of the oldest elements in the American Jewish communal structure, the burial society. It is a critique of secularization theory. Provides information on the history, role in the contemporary world, and function in a highly secular society of the Jewish burial society.

Academic Perceptions of Italian American Immigration as Seen in Scholarly Journals of the 1880s
Barattini, Kathryn DeFatta
2004 0-7734-6239-2 132 pages
Book attempts to highlight anytime “Italian immigration” or “Italian immigrants” are mentioned in a scholarly periodical, including both passing notations and in-depth critical analyses of these topics. These references allow us to examine the initial and evolving perceptions of the academic community toward mass Italian American immigration from its basic beginnings in the early 1880s through the end of that decade. In addition, references about Italian immigration from the popular periodical press of the time are juxtaposed with the scholarly references to allow further insight into the erudite community’s perceptions as they are framed within the public opinion of the day.

ALCOHOL AND ALTERED STATES IN ANCESTOR VENERATION RITUALS OF ZHOU DYNASTY CHINA AND IRON AGE PALESTINE:
A New Approach to Ancestor Rituals
Armstrong, David
1998 0-7734-8360-8 164 pages
Alcohol has been the means to induce altered states of consciousness in many religious contexts. This book is the first to examine how alcohol-based trance states can be a feature of ancestor veneration practices. Two cases are explored in detail. In the first, alcohol is established as the trigger which induced a state of spirit mediumship in the Zhou dynasty Chinese Personator of the Dead. In the second case, the Ugaritic and Iron Age Palestinian marzeah is revealed as a descent to the dead induced by alcohol consumption. Principal sources are Chinese odes, histories and ritual texts, Ugaritic Texts and Biblical prophetic literature. Archaeological evidence also contributes to understanding these two rituals in their cultural contexts.

American Moral and Sentimental Magazine ( New York 1797-1798). An Annotated Catalogue
Pitcher, Edward
2005 0-7734-6137-X 152 pages
This New York semi-monthly periodical edited by Thomas Kirk appeared from July 1797 through May 1798 under a voluminous title that marks it as a hybrid serial-anthology/magazine: The American Moral & Sentimental Magazine, consisting of a Collection of Select Pieces, in Prose and Verse, from the Best Authors, on Religious, Moral, and Sentimental Subjects, calculated to Form the Understanding and Improve the Heart. Kirk was especially zealous to defend the “sacred and eternal obligations of Virtue and Religion” as that “affords a pleasure truly rational and refined.” Readers were invited to forward their own or any compositions to the editor, but from the outset, it was apparent that the editor would provide a “Collection of Select Pieces” and had material in hand that might or might not be supplemented by local contributions. In particular, as is documented in this annotated catalogue, Kirk provided a great deal on the “moral” and only a modest number of “sentimental” articles. As the annotations here demonstrate, just as travel narratives could serve the cause of religion, morality could be served by a judicious selection from the literature of sentiment, works wherein rough passions were modestly checked by refined emotions and a rational sensibility.

An Anatomy of Reprintings and Plagiarisms: Finding Keys to Editorial Practices and Magazine History, 1730-1820
Pitcher, Edward
2001 0-7734-7657-1 220 pages
Gathers a variety of studies of British and American magazines in which the reprinted articles when traced to their origins reveal practices of editors that otherwise might go undetected. Some of these practices are false sales figures, false charges of plagiarism against those from whom the magazines most frequently plagiarized, the disguised reprinting of something old as something new, disclosure of scandal in the lives of persons invented to permit scandal to be disclosed, and promises of wonderful things to appear which never would or were intended to appear.

ANALYTICAL STUDY OF THE LEGAL, MORAL AND ETHICAL ASPECTS OF THE LIVING PHENOMENON OF EUTHANASIA:
Questions of Law, Morality and Ethics within Contemporary Society
Ost, Suzanne
2003 0-7734-6613-4 366 pages
This work provides a close examination of the definitional issues surrounding euthanasia, and analyses euthanasia as a ‘living phenomenon’ which can be best understood by reflecting upon subjective understandings of the subject and individuals’ lived experiences of their medical conditions and treatment. The work addresses not only the law surrounding voluntary active euthanasia, but also the withdrawal of treatment from incapacitated patients, the refusal of treatment by competent patients, and the subject of advance directives. Additionally the work takes a comparative approach to euthanasia laws in the Netherlands and Australia in order to illustrate the differing legal and ethical positions that exist. The work includes a small empirical study which takes forward some of the central issues by placing them in the contextual setting provided by members of the medical profession, hospice staff, general public, and voluntary and anti-euthanasia society members.

Best of Gentleman's Magazine, 1731-1754
Reitan, Earl
1987 0-88946-457-X 412 pages
An anthology of articles on politics, religion, science, exploration, marriage and family life, theater and the arts, medicine, and popular culture from the most influential periodical of the eighteenth century.

British Magazine January 1760-December 1767, Part 1. An Annotated Index of Signatures, Ascriptions, Subjects, and Titles of Literary Prose
Pitcher, Edward
2000 0-7734-7791-8 202 pages
There is a heavy reliance on extracts from pamphlets and reprintings from contemporary magazines and newspapers.

British Magazine, 1746-1751, Part 2
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-6934-6 324 pages
Whatever the strengths of the magazine through five volumes, the final volume of five numbers (January-May 1751) is conspicuously poorer in quality. There is a heavy reliance on extracts from pamphlets and reprintings (some veiled) from contemporary magazines and newspapers. Consequently, readers must have noticed the decline in quality and abandoned the magazine during the first half of the year. The final number for May was published late (about mid-June 1751), and then the British was silenced.

Case Study of Genocide in the Ukrainian Famine of 1921-1923
Veryha, Wasyl
2007 0-7734-5278-8 384 pages
Examines the discriminatory ways of combating famine in two different areas: in the Volga Valley of Russia and in the south-eastern Ukrainian provinces. Since Russia and Ukraine were governed by Moscow’s War Communism economic policy, every province had an assignment contingent of grain to deliver to the state, and to the Volga Valley, but not to the starving Ukrainian provinces. During the Ukrainian famine of 1921 to 1923, it is estimated that 2 to 2.5 million people starved to death. This book contains 6 black and white photographs.

Charles Lamb as the London Magazine’s “Elia”
Monsman, Gerald
2003 0-7734-6592-8 218 pages
Examines Charles Lamb’s satiric exuberance as an important component of Romantic emotional intensity. Lamb’s essays comment importantly – and in ways not previously recognized – on the poetry of such major romantics as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron, several of whom he knew personally. Lamb’s original essays in the London Magazine differ from their collected form in the Essays of Elia and have never been reprinted. This volume contains the original London Magazine essays, with Lamb’s original spelling, with commentary following.

Checkpoint - Poems of Death and Old Age a Bilingual Edition of Posto Di Blocco
Chapple, Erasmi
1991 0-7734-9630-0 240 pages
Libero Bigiaretti's Checkpoint, is a translation of poetry in Italian into English making the latest work by Italian author Libero Bigaretti available to the North American public. Bigiaretti searches for where the other has become the absolute denial of the reality of the self. What is singular is his perspective of a man who looks at life with the consciousness that his work is done. Bigaretti writes humorously from that narrow strip of no-man’s land between the memory of a meaningful life and the contemplation of death. The book contains an introduction, notes, original text, and translation. Libero Bigiaretti's Checkpoint, is a translation of poetry in Italian into English making the latest work by Italian author Libero Bigaretti available to the North American public. Bigiaretti searches for where the other has become the absolute denial of the reality of the self. What is singular is his perspective of a man who looks at life with the consciousness that his work is done. Bigaretti writes humorously from that narrow strip of no-man’s land between the memory of a meaningful life and the contemplation of death. The book contains an introduction, notes, original text, and translation. Fourteen illustrations by the author are also included.

Chinese and Chinese American Ancestor Veneration in the Catholic Church, 635 A. D. to the Present
Butcher, Beverly J.
2010 0-7734-3624-3 492 pages
This work demonstrates that the ultimate creation and performance of the ancestor memorial liturgy by the Catholic Church is the practical realization of the ideal to renew attempts at worldwide inculturation as set forth during Vatican II. This book contains twelve color photograhs.

Comick Magazine or, Compleat Library of Mirth, Humour, Wit, Gaiety and Entertainment by the Greatest Wits of All Ages & Nations (London: Harrison & Co., March-December 1796)
Edward W.R. Pitcher
2006 0-7734-5595-7 120 pages
An annotated catalogue of The Comick Magazine (March-December 1796). Included in the catalogue is a Register of the Monthly Contents, a Title and Initial-Wording Index in Prose form, a Title and Initial-Wording Index in poetry form, an Index of Authors, Signatures, and Sources, as well as section of Works Cited and Consulted

Contrasts in the Representation of Death by Sophocles, Webster and Strindberg
Eaton, Winifred Kittredge
1975 0-7734-0423-6 244 pages


Court, City, and Country Magazine, 1761-65
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-7055-7 372 pages
The Court, City and Country Magazines was published from September 1761 to November 1765, but initially monthly numbers appeared under the title of Court Magazine, then in March 1763 they were changed to Court and City Magazines, and another change followed in February 1764 to The Court, City and Country Magazine, and this is the title to the end of the magazine's run, and the title used for the collected final volume.

Daily Life in Georgian England as Reported in the Gentleman’s Magazine
de Montluzin, Emily
2002 0-7734-7351-3 388 pages
This is a fully annotated scholarly anthology of selected excerpts from the Gentleman’s Magazine concerning topics of crime, medicine, science and natural history, archaeology, religion, parliamentary reporting, the American Colonies, the French Revolution, riots and radicalism, and literary criticism. Established in 1731 and generally considered the first major magazine in England, it constitutes an enormous and scarcely tapped source for scholarly investigation of Hanoverian culture and society. After a general introduction, nine chapters contain annotated excerpts from the first hundred years of publication, arranged topically, chosen to cover the widest possible range of aspects of Georgian life.

Death and Taxes in the Ancient Near East
Orel, Sara
1992 0-7734-9512-6 256 pages
An understanding of the treatment of the dead enables us to reconstruct the relationship of an individual to other individuals. Taxation helps define one's relationship with the political structure of society. These articles originated in a faculty/graduate student symposium organized by the Graduate Students Association of the Dept. of Near Eastern Studies at the University of Toronto (March 1991). With illustrations.

Death and Violence in Old and Middle English Literature
Sutton, John William
2007 0-7734-5469-1 244 pages
Explores how medieval English authors used the spectacle of a character’s death to express their views about the martial culture of their aristocratic countrymen. The argument is set forth that authorial attitudes toward the warrior ethos evolved from respect or even veneration during the Anglo-Saxon period to condemnation in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, when, after hundreds of years of incessant warfare, writers came to see this ethos as little more than a system of institutionalized violence. Given the texts it considers, this book should appeal particularly to Anglo-Saxonists and Arthurianists, as well as to scholars of war in the Middles Ages and to gender theorists who study medieval conceptions of masculinity.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. An Annotated Initial Wording Index
Pitcher, Edward W. R.
2003 0-7734-6744-0 244 pages
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 1. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
Pitcher, Edward W. R.
2003 0-7734-6747-5 302 pages
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest. Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 2. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
Pitcher, Edward W. R.
2003 0-7734-6745-9 300 pages
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 3. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
Pitcher, Edward W. R.
2003 0-7734-6749-1 280 pages
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Epitaph Culture in the West
Guthke, Karl S.
2003 0-7734-6785-8 436 pages
This book examines a number of facets of Western epitaph culture since antiquity, with particular emphasis on post-medieval developments in the major European countries as well as in North America. Various epitaphic “sub-cultures” are analyzed, among them the time-honored custom of composing one’s own tomb inscription as well as the ancient and modern convention of honoring animals with epitaphs. It also examines epitaph-collecting, epitaph “lies,” humorous epitaphs, and the change in social and religious attitudes toward suicides. The book concludes with a cultural and intellectual history of epitaphs. An epilogue addresses the question of the supposed disappearance of epitaph culture at the present time.

Female Serial Murderer
Scott, Hannah
2005 0-7734-6000-4 216 pages
Focus on gender bias in perceptions of criminal women, using the extreme example of serial murder. Often, an examination of the extreme can show cultural biases with greater clarity. This book shows that men and women, as with more common homicide trends, carry out serial murdering in different patterns. Lastly, this book will explore another possible definition of serial murder as well as some alternative theoretical approaches to the problem. While there have been numerous studies of male serial killers, studies of female serial killers are lacking, even though, as the statistics of this book document, there have been many over time.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 1
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-7107-3 462 pages
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 2
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-7103-0 424 pages
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 3
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-7101-4 368 pages
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

FUNERAL RITUALS IN EASTERN SHANDONG, CHINA:
An Anthropological Study
Shaoming, Zhou
2009 0-7734-3890-4 296 pages
This work is the first detailed Western study of contemporary funeral rituals in villages in north China. At a time of great social transformation in China, this work examines funeral rituals, encompassing the rites of transformation and the rites of disposal.

Grounds for Belief in Life After Death
Clarkson, George
1987 0-88946-716-1 160 pages
Expounds a Christian viewpoint of life after death, including a background chapter on biblical roots and encompassing some mystical and existential approaches. An appendix presents Paul Tillich's 1962 Harvard lecture, "Symbols of Eternal Life."

History of Man's Responses to Death Mythologies, Rituals, and Ethics
Prioreschi, Plinio
1990 0-88946-142-2 504 pages
This book examines death from a biological and historical point of view, and its impact on human thinking. The problems of unexplained death, the criteria of death, and its meaning in the light of the Second Law of Thermodynamics are discussed. The answers given by philosophy and the sociological aspects of the phenomena related to the care of the terminally ill, to mercy killing, to suicide and to the death penalty, are also investigated. The thesis supported is that the fear of death is the motivation behind our need to accomplish anything (be it having children or getting the Nobel Prize) that will allow us to survive death. The primary cause of most of our actions in fact, are traced to our desire to achieve some form of immortality. The fear of death is considered to be life’s main energy source. In sum, the book finds that fear of death is the motive behind the human need to accomplish anything at all and discusses care of the terminally ill, mercy killing, suicide, and the death penalty.

How Arab Journalists Translate English-Language Newspaper Headlines: Case Studies in Cross-Cultural Understanding
Ali, Ghadya A.
2010 0-7734-3838-6 368 pages
This work is a comparative descriptive analysis of seventy English language headlines and their Arabic translations gathered from the Arab national and international press and news agencies over the period of January 1, 2002 through August 1, 2002, a period that happened to include the months leading up to the second Iraq war. The headlines considered in this study are selected for their relevance to Middle East issues and for their importance. While headline translation has received some attention from scholars, there is little or nothing in the literature that deals specifically with the translation of English language headlines into Arabic.

How Should a Christian Die?
Richardson, Herbert
2013 0-7734-2619-1 60 pages
This monograph is a reflective journey about life and death by the Harvard and University of Toronto Professor, Herbert Richardson. Richardson explores the hardship of life and the spiritual suffering of a Christian trying to follow in the path of Jesus by contextualizing these ideas via the stages of life one passes through. By suffering like Christ, individuals are able to construct for themselves a life and a death that holds meaning because of what they did while on earth.

Illness Beliefs and Feeding the Dead in Hindu Nepal an Ethnographic Analysis
Stone, Linda
1988 0-88946-060-4 150 pages
Analyzes villagers' cultural use of food and food symbols and contrasts Hindu Nepalese social ideology with that of the Western world, where individualism and equality are expressed and valued.

Investigation of Koimaomai in the New Testament. The Concept of Eschatological Sleep
Jackson, Paul
1996 0-7734-2417-2 260 pages
This work argues that the sleep-of-death metaphor in New Testament usage is compatible with an approach to a model of the intermediate state called wholistic dualism. Focusing mainly on the New Testament witness, this book investigates the historical progression of the use of the term koimaomai and its minor semantic associates from the time of Homer to the early church fathers. The time frame includes a consideration of non-Christian Greek and Latin sources; the Hellenistic period including the LXX, Pseudepigrapha, Philo, Josephus; the semantic domain in Hebrew and Aramaic incorporating the Old Testament and the literature of Second Temple Judaism; and the early post-biblical reaction. An exhaustive search of the TLG uncovered many striking examples from primary sources.

Japanese Translations of the Jesuit Mission Press, 1590-1614
Farge, William J., S.J.
2002 0-7734-6918-4 156 pages
Through examples, the methods of translation and editing used by the mission press in its attempt to produce a native Christian literature for Japan is explored. Part One examines two translations of De Imitatio Christi - Contemptus mundi jenbu and the Kontemutsusu munji, a later version. Part Two examines Guia de Pecadores - Giya do pekadoru. The study details their background, structure and style, with a textual analysis and comparison. The author identifies the translations' Buddhist terminology, the only religious language available to the Jesuits in Japan, and explains how Buddhist terms were used to convey Christian ideas.

John Wesley's Book Stock and the Arminian Magazine Catalogue of 1789
Rogal, Samuel J.
2006 0-7734-5541-8 188 pages
This study is an attempt to place John and Charles Wesley and their Methodist organization within the general context of the eighteenth century book trade in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and parts of British North America. John Wesley proposed to spread his evangelical message through the sale and distribution of books and depended on the income of those books to allow for the mission’s operation and conduct. The Book Stock fulfilled these two objectives, albeit with personal and organizational difficulties. The Arminian Magazine “Catalogue” of 1789, the subject of this study, helps demonstrate and define Wesley’s role as an eighteenth century publisher.

Ladies Magazine, 1749-53
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-6979-6 212 pages
Considered a publication with information and articles specific for "ladies of society" in Colonial America.

Lady’s Monthly Museum First Series: 1798-1806 an Annotated Index Under Contributors’ Names, Pseudonuymous Signature, and Ascriptions
Pitcher, Edward
2000 0-7734-7836-1 356 pages


Le Journal Historique, Politique, Critique et Galant (1719) by Justus Van Effen. A Critical Edition
Effen, Justus van
2008 0-7734-5136-6 412 pages
Le Journal historique, politique, critique et galant (1719) by Justus van Effen attempts to give the news of the day in “all of Europe”and presents a fascinating moment in European history, paying special attention to the Quadruple Alliance and the impending war. . . In addition to providing insight into an interesting hybrid periodical, Le Journal historique, politique, critique et galant gives a remarkable view of life in early 1719 from the perspective of seasoned journalist Justus van Effen. In French.

Letters From Nineteenth Century American Children to Robert Merry’s Museum Magazine
Pflieger, Pat
2001 0-7734-7505-2 692 pages
Published from 1841 to 1872, Robert Merry’s Museum was the premiere American children’s magazine of its time (its editors included Samuel Goodrich, S. T. Allen, John N. Stearns, and Louisa May Alcott), and the first American periodical for children to publish letters from its subscribers. They often told ‘Uncle Robert’ all about themselves, their families, and their activities: the result is a record of the lives of ordinary people in nineteenth-century America. Here is the growing pre-War sectionalism, the Civil War and its aftermath, attitudes toward minorities and public figures, women’s rights, and major events. The collection of over 600 letters will appeal to those interested in American social history, women’s studies, media history, and popular culture.

Letters to Mr. Urban of the Gentleman's Magazine, 1751-1811
Sherbo, Arthur
1997 0-7734-8427-2 260 pages
Gentleman's Magazine, begun in 1731, soon featured a section devoted to letters from various correspondents on many subjects, from all parts of Britain and abroad. Many of the letter-writers were clergymen, many were antiquaries. Some accompanied their letters with drawings, inscriptions, and sketches. There was virtually no subject left untouched, and there is information of one kind or another, neglected by scholars in many branches of learning. Readers of this volume will find biographical information, literary criticism, Shakespeare criticism, theatrical data, and bibliographic material. Table of Contents: Richard Greene, Curator of His Own Museum; William Bickerstaffe, An Active Curate; Theophilus Lobb, Pii hominis; Samuel Watson, Another Quiet Life; Thomas Holt White, Brother of Gilbert White of Selborne; John Kynaston, A Neglected Shakespearean; Joseph Boerhadem, Old-Fashined Clergyman; The Reverend Mr. Samuel Badcock, Reviewer for the Monthly Review; H. N., Unidentified Scholar; Samuel Ayscough of the British Museum, Prince of Index-Makers; Henry Lemoine, Hack of all Trades; John Elderton, Chaplain to the Earl of Cork and Orrery

Literary Magazine and British Review ( London: 1788-1794). An Annotated Catalog of the Prose and Verse ( Book One)
Pitcher, Edward
2005 0-7734-6134-5 376 pages
Pitcher’s annotated catalogue of its contents (Literary Magazine and British Review for 1788) reveals its explicit emphasis on biography. The great majority of these articles concern French notables, or the less familiar characters attached to them, with a clear editorial interest in contemporaries active in the ferment of the French Revolution. The emphasis on things French is also reflected in reviews and articles translated from French sources (including papers published by scientific societies). The editor records details of the original poems from “Angelina,” but generally shows that the magazine reprints conventional fare. The “American Connection” is shown to be implicit from the outset of publication insomuch as the spelling adopted in early volumes is that established by Noah Webster, and not that followed by every other British magazine (or the Literary after 1791). Pitcher also remarks where the political bias of this magazine is strong and conspicuous.

Literary Magazine and British Review ( London: 1788-1794). An Annotated Catalog of the Prose and Verse ( Book Two)
Pitcher, Edward
2005 0-7734-6136-1 432 pages
Pitcher’s annotated catalogue of its contents (Literary Magazine and British Review for 1788) reveals its explicit emphasis on biography. The great majority of these articles concern French notables, or the less familiar characters attached to them, with a clear editorial interest in contemporaries active in the ferment of the French Revolution. The emphasis on things French is also reflected in reviews and articles translated from French sources (including papers published by scientific societies). The editor records details of the original poems from “Angelina,” but generally shows that the magazine reprints conventional fare. The “American Connection” is shown to be implicit from the outset of publication insomuch as the spelling adopted in early volumes is that established by Noah Webster, and not that followed by every other British magazine (or the Literary after 1791). Pitcher also remarks where the political bias of this magazine is strong and conspicuous. Given this degree of editorial liberal-mindedness, Pitcher concludes in this two-volume study that it is a tribute to British tolerance that the magazine lasted as long as the middle of 1794, although admittedly the optimistically liberal politics championed early were sadly betrayed by le terreur (June 1793 – July 1794), and in the final two years, the Literary Magazine and British Review became increasingly less outspoken.

Literary Prose of Westminster Magazine 1773-1785. An Annotated Index Under Contributors’ Names, Pseudonymous Signature, and Ascriptions
Pitcher, Edward
2000 0-7734-7834-5 356 pages
Table of Contents: Introduction; Annotated Index to Authors of Prose; Alphabetical file for titles of Prose Articles; Biographical Subject Index; Castles and Views Subject Index; Education Subject Index; Religion Subject Index; Trials and Executions Subject Index; Works Cited

Loiterer
Mack, Robert L.
2006 0-7734-5657-0 556 pages
The Oxford-based weekly periodical, The Loiterer, which appeared from January 31, 1789 to March 20, 1790, was the creation of both James Austen and his younger brother, Henry. Although the work of both men would be obscured by the achievements of their sister, Jane, their own writing deserves attention. The Loiterer represents an important stage in the history and development of the periodical essay as an English literary mode or genre.

Magazine Sources for Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments, by Mr. Addison (London 1794-1797)
Pitcher, Edward William
2004 0-7734-6575-8 352 pages
The Interesting Anecdotes by “Mr. Addison” are generally identified as a multi-volume miscellany of prose and verse, collected in 1794-97, but the extant volumes dated 1797 are apparently reissues of volumes which appeared earlier. While the listings here usefully document specific borrowings, the data also suggest the way in which literary magazines had become a resource to spur growth in that part of publishing which provided miscellanies and ‘judicious selections’ to the common reader.

Mormon and Asian American Model Minority Discourses in News and Popular Magazines
Chen, Chiung Hwang
2004 0-7734-6375-5 305 pages
Manuscript situates news and popular magazines’ coverage of Asian Americans and Mormons within model minority discourse, explains the discourse’s problematic nature, and points out how the two discourses shape power relations between majorities and minorities in American society. The book employs critical discourse analysis, a powerful tool to uncover ideology within dominant discourses and challenge unequal power structures in society. By so doing, it aims to improve society for minority groups. The book also explores journalistic narrative. By following conventional narrative forms and shared cultural meanings, journalists often adopt established cultural norms and reinforce status quo ideologies. Chen’s goal is not simply to analyze the model minority discourse in news and popular magazines or merely to provide a critique of journalists’ conventional narrative forms. She also uses her analysis of journalistic discourse as a means of consciousness-raising—for both minority groups and journalists—and to further encourage alternative approaches to writing about minority groups.

Mustering of Support for World War I by the Ladies' Home Journal
Karetzky, Joanne
1997 0-7734-2250-1 160 pages
Concentrates mainly on the visual ways in which The Ladies' Home Journal conveyed the Journal's political and social views in its wartime editions. It demonstrates how the editor, Edward Bok, orchestrated elements of his magazine to serve his editorial vision, namely that the United States should be involved in the Great War, and in enlisting the active support of the readers.

New American Magazine (Woodbridge, New Jersey, January 1758-March 1760)

2004 0-7734-6346-1 265 pages
The New American Magazine contained installment features, stories, essays, poems, news, chronicles and lists, the conventional kinds of offering of the established British magazines. The contents of the New American Magazine have been recorded here in a month-by-month Register, with all the articles separately listed by title and initial wording.

New Novelist’s Magazine (London 1786-1788)
Pitcher, Edward W. R., editor
2006 0-7734-6141-8 196 pages
This “elegant collection of the many beautiful little tales and stories scattered throughout innumerable voluminous miscellanies” (Advertisement) was directly inspired by the success of Harrison and Co.’s weekly serialization of their Novelist’s Magazine (1780-88, collected in 23 volumes), but also one of a series of experiments in short-run magazine publications, mixing original with reprinted materials.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 1
Pitcher, Edward W.
2006 0-7734-5607-4 336 pages
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 2
Pitcher, Edward W.
2006 0-7734-5605-8 344 pages
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 3
Pitcher, Edward W.
2006 0-7734-5603-1 452 pages
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Weekly Magazine. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose, 1800-1811.
Pitcher, Edward
2000 0-7734-7840-X 496 pages
The New York Weekly began May 17, 1788, as The Impartial Gazetteer and Saturday Evening Post, published by John Harrisson and Stephen Purdy. Both profitable and popular, it culled works from such magazines as Westminster, Town and Country, European, London, Universal, and Lady’s. This catalog is designed to assist those who have learned the value of studying the lesser literature of this period. In addition to the main alphabetical listings, several special-interest headings have been used in a selective ‘subject index’.

Pennsylvania Magazine or American Monthly Museum, Philadelphia, 1775-76
Pitcher, Edward William
2001 0-7734-7326-2 160 pages
The journal's purpose was to present information and correspondence about "significant" events and cultural activities that were relevant to the Colonies and not to Europe.

Psalms of Lamentation and the Enigma of Suffering
Moore, R
1996 0-7734-2416-4 144 pages
This study investigates the psalms of lamentation in order to determine what contributions they provide toward the understanding of suffering. Three areas were selected for investigation: the reasons for suffering, the reactions to suffering, and resolutions to suffering. The psalms of lamentation address the issue of suffering more clearly than any portions of the Old Testament. Identification is the key - as we identify with the authors of the psalms, and the reasons they suffered, how they reacted to pain, and how they resolved their pain, then we can understand better our suffering.

Repository and Ladies Weekly Museum, Philadelphia 1800-06. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose with Notes on Authors, Signatures, and Sources
Pitcher, Edward
2001 0-7734-7499-4 280 pages
Reference guide to multi-faceted journal.

Royal American Magazine, 1774-75. An Annotated Catalog
Pitcher, Edward
2001 0-7734-7405-6 152 pages
Documenting of the contents of The Royal American Magazine, or Universal Repository of Instruction and Amusement, published in Boston, January 1774-March 1775.

Royal Magazine or, Gentleman’s Monthly Companion, 1759-1769
Pitcher, Edward William
2007 0-7734-6743-2 672 pages
Intended to complement the information in volume 8 of the series, this work offers a comprehensive list of prose articles published in the Royal Magazine: or Gentleman's Monthly Companion (London: J. Coote 1759-69). Arranged chronologically by issue.

Rural Magazine or, Vermont Repository ( Rutland: January 1795 - December 1796)
Pitcher, Edward W.R.
2005 0-7734-6115-9 280 pages
This collection was, the title page avowed, “devoted to Literary, Moral, Historical, and Political Improvement,” and editor Samuel Williams set out in particular to address the interests of the citizens of Vermont by “collecting and preserving such papers and proceedings” and such original “historical and political documents, literary, civil or ecclesiastical” as would “exhibit to the public a general account and view of the state and progress of society, in this part of the Federal Union (Preface to Number One, Volume One). The analysis of the magazine by Pitcher shows that Williams seems to have set out to model his magazine after Mathew Carey’s American Museum (Philadelphia 1787-92), especially in its divisions into several departments and interest in history and politics, and he used it as a source when he needed to fill his own columns. Williams gave substantial attention to American subjects, important archival materials of Vermont in particular, and, as befitted a “Rural Magazine,” he paid due regard to agricultural, medical, botanical and zoological matters (and subjects touching material culture in other areas).

Sacred Geography of the American Mound-Builders
Korp, Maureen
1990 0-88946-484-7 140 pages


SOCIOLOGICAL AND SPIRITUAL ASPECTS OF PALLIATIVE CARE IN IRELAND:
Understandings of a “ Good Death”
MacConville, Una
2011 0-7734-1570-X 356 pages
This book explores understandings of a ‘good death’ and the spiritual dimension of care in an Irish palliative care setting. It provides a new theoretical framework in which these experiences and how they are shaped by their cultural context can be understood.

Socrates, Lucretius, Camus - Two Philosophical Traditions on Death
Wilson, Fred
2001 0-7734-7369-6 540 pages
This monograph links reasons for attitudes toward death to reasons for different metaphysical positions on the human being and the place of the human being in the universe. Most recent discussions of death either place the topic directly in the context of nothing more than ethical considerations without reference to the deeper ontological or metaphysical issues, or place it in the context of Heideggerian or existentialist considerations. This essays goes deeper than the former and provides a broader context than the latter. The discussion is structured by the thought of Camus, providing a careful reading of both The Myth of Sisyphus and The Outsider. Examines his connection to both the empiricist tradition and Hume, Plotinus, Lucretius, Socrates, Aristotle, the Stoics, and into the modern period with Spinoza. Their metaphysical positions on death are fully laid out.

Studia Mystica
Boenig, Robert , Mary E. Giles, and Kate Greenspan, editors
1998 1996 pages
This annual journal includes contributions on mysticism and visionary literature in any cultural or religious tradition, and essays that explore connections among mysticism, the arts, and the humanities, employing interdisciplinary and comparative approaches.

Study of German Political-Cultural Periodicals From the Years of Allied Occupation 1945-1949
Flanagan, Clare
2000 0-7734-7781-0 296 pages
Focusing on five journals, Aufbau, Ost und West, Der Monat, Der Ruf, and Frankfurter Hefte, it reveals the scope and nature of opinion in Germany during occupation rule and before formal division. These journals provide a representative sample of opinion on a range of subjects. Prominent among these issues are Europe, cultural and political representation, collective guilt and denazification. Some areas of enquiry, notably Third Way politics and the exploration of guilt and national history, were subsequently undervalued in the dominant historical narratives of the Cold War. With their wide range of contributors and concerns, these journals chart this intense debate, highlight the course of cultural politics in East and West, and shed light on the extent of Cold War intrusion on the post-war recovery of German thought and discourse.

Study of the Intellectual and Material Culture of Death in Nineteenth Century America
Steiner, Michael J.
2003 0-7734-6823-4 232 pages


Teaching the Shoah in the Twenty-First Century - Topics and Topographies
Sibelman, Simon P.
2004 0-7734-6403-4 227 pages
This book is a collection of essays arising from the international conference The Legacy of the Holocaust: Teaching the Shoah that was held at the University of Nebraska at Omaha in 1999. Hundreds of scholars and educators gathered for five days of seminars, workshops and academic sessions each of which addressed specific topics and pedagogies for teaching the Shoah. The essays selected for inclusion in this book represent the thoroughly developed views that a group of scholars/ educators advanced at the conference. Their contributions address major concerns of educators and scholars already established in the field, as well as those of individuals just venturing into the arena. Each essay explores a distinctive Shoah related topic, or proposes an innovative pedagogical approach for effectively presenting the Holocaust to students. This book would be of interest to any person engaged in the study of or research into the Holocaust, or for educators seeking innovative and proven classroom methods for teaching the subject.

There are two portions to this work: topics and topographies. The Topics section will afford close readings of a variety of Holocaust related subjects, many not commonly taught. The topics cross traditional disciplines and extend a complexity of issues arising from purely traditional considerations of the Shoah (i.e. historical, literary or cultural). Topographies introduce specific methodologies that educators have developed for teaching the Holocaust. Instead of dwelling on “tried and true” canonical practices, these contributors advance genuinely resourceful methods for presenting standard Holocaust texts. Contributions in both categories provide suggested reading and viewing lists, which for educators involved in the field, for students investigating the topic, or interested lay readers will prove invaluable.

The Function of the Living Dead in Medieval Norse and Celtic Literature: Death and Desire
Smith, Gregg A
2007 0-7734-5353-9 196 pages
Examines the nature and function of the dead in medieval Norse and Celtic literature. It is demonstrated that agents of the living dead in these literatures have a functional and formulaic role, largely manifested as a process of wish-fulfillment. While the authors of these stories provide resonances of past beliefs regarding the dead, they also appear to have adapted these ideas for their own purposes in order to involve the dead as role-players in their stories. This book contains 11 color photographs.

THE MANY WAYS WE TALK ABOUT DEATH IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY:
Interdisciplinary Studies in Portrayal and Classification
Souza, Margaret and Christina Staudt
2009 0-7734-4688-5 452 pages
An interdisciplinary work that examines the representation of death in traditional and “new” media, explore the meaning of assassination and suicide in a post 9/11 context, and grapple with the use of legal and medical tools that affect the quest for a “good death.” The contributors treat their interrelated topics from the perspective of their expertise in medicine, law, psychology, anthropology, sociology, political science, religion, philosophy, literature, media, and visual culture.

THE NEAR-DEATH EXPERIENCES OF HOSPITALIZED INTENSIVE CARE PATIENTS:
A Five-Year Clinical Study
Sartori, Penny
2008 0-7734-5103-X 588 pages
This clinical study is the largest of its kind in the United Kingdom and the first long-term prospective study of NDEs in existence. Most research into near-death experiences (NDEs) is based on anecdotal accounts which have no medical data to verify proximity to death or support the reports.

THE SECULARIZATION OF DEATH IN SCOTLAND, 1815-1900:
How the Funeral Industry Displaced the Church as Custodian of the Dead
(A Study of Private Cemeteries, Public Crematoria, and Bereavement Practices in Edinburgh)
Smith, Michael
2015 0-7734-3521-2 360 pages
Death is one of the few constants of human experience. It is a fact of life that binds humanity. Despite its familiarity, the rituals, customs, and attitudes relating to it are ever-changing, always reflecting the hopes, fears, and ambitions of living society. This book considers how death practices were transformed during the nineteenth century. Using Edinburgh as a backdrop, it covers a range of issues relating to death, from changing expectations at the graveside to changing attitudes toward the afterlife. The nineteenth century was a formative period. Here, we witness the foundations being laid for many of the features that we take for granted in the early twenty-first century.

A rapidly changing society saw death become a statistical issue, a public health issue, an event where professional practitioners become increasingly important in terms of how the vent was handled. Yet institutional change would be only one of a number of dynamic forces that were shaping the manner in which people met their end. An increasingly capitalist economy meant that death would become big business. This in turn would transform how the funeral and the expression of grief, would be performed. But it is never a one-way process, and change does not always filter down from an institutional level. Any change in death culture reflects a number of processes, some of which are obvious, and some given the private nature of loss, which are ultimately inscrutable.



Traditionalism Versus Modernism at Death Allegorical Tales of Africa
Njoku, John
1989 0-88946-188-0 150 pages
Describes two differing concepts of death and death rituals, those of Modernism and Traditionalism, and depicts, through the story medium, how they wrestle for preeminence at funerals.

Understanding Life and Death Through Plato and Socrates. Philosophy as a Confrontation with Eternity
Weierter, Stuart
2012 0-7734-2899-2 314 pages
It fills in a gap by outlining the ways that Plato and Socrates talk about life and death. There is also a lengthy discussion of how Aristophanes responded with satirical exaggerations of their positions. This author focuses entirely on how death and eternity are integral thematic components of the Platonic dialogues. The contribution is in drawing on copious secondary material to make the argument that all great philosophy must serve as a confrontation with eternity. It must make the audience resolve the issue of their own mortality by confronting our precarious place in the cosmos. Eternity is a prescient theme in Plato and Socrates, which is important for bolstering their place in the Western canon.

Universal Spectator (London 1728-1746)
Pitcher, Edward William
2004 0-7734-6409-3 410 pages
The Universal Spectator was published in 907 weekly issues from October 12, 1728 through February 22, 1746. With the exception of the essay journals conducted by Addison and Steele, there is no literary periodical of the first half of the eighteenth century with a better claim to originality and variety.

Volume One: Sentimental Magazine, 1773-177: An Annotated Catalogue of the Prose and Verse
Pitcher, Edward
2004 0-7734-6303-8 208 pages


Weekly Miscellany Sherborne, 1773-83. Vol. 1
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-7000-X 532 pages
Contains volumes of a weekly periodical printed and edited in Sherborne by Robert Goadby.

Weekly Miscellany Sherborne, 1773-83. Vol. 2
Pitcher, Edward William
2002 0-7734-6605-3 416 pages
Contains volumes of a weekly periodical printed and edited in Sherborne by Robert Goadby.

Wit's Magazine, or Library of Momus ( London: Harrison & Co., 1784-85)
Pitcher, Edward W.R.
2006 0-7734-5599-X 276 pages
This catalogue embraces the poetry, stories, anecdotes, and essays of this “Library of Momus” published in seventeen monthly numbers (January 1784 through May 1785). The copious minor verses pieces (rebuses, paradoxes, epitaphs, epigrams, distiches, etc.) in “The Sphinx” have not been indexed by first line or title, but such entries are given short notice, with authors’ names and signatures recorded, in the Register of each monthly part. There are no reviews, political sections or news departments in the magazine. Materials for the magazine were to be selected from the best authors to supplement original contributions in prose and verse, and that articles would not be confined to the humorous or witty.