Subject Area: World War II

American Prisoners of War in German Death, Concentration, and Slave Labor Camps
2003 0-7734-6657-6
Using 16 personal interviews, government documents from Germany and the US, the author explores the experience of American POWs who were held in German concentration, death and slave labor camps. The work provides detailed accounts that document the presence of American POWs in these camps, and explores the reasons why the US government systematically suppressed information about them. It affirms that German policy was to kill as many prisoners as possible from all the allied nations, and systematically legalized its actions. It shows that the murder of POWs in death and concentration camps was not a matter of isolated incidents or random acts, but a planned policy. Other allied nations accepted the reports of their returning troops, but the US government denied the facts and covered them up.

Americans in Post-World War II Germany. Teachers, Tinkers, Neighbors, and Nuisances
1998 0-7734-2245-5


BBC Broadcasts to Portugal in World War 2. How Radio Was Used as a Weapon of War
2011 0-7734-1487-8
The study employs archival research to produce a narrative of the early history of radio in Portugal, from its emergence through to the end of World War II. It analyzes foreign broadcasters' impact in the country during the War.

Bickersteth Family World War II Diary. Dear Grandmother (Volume 1) 1939-1942
1999 0-7734-7904-X
This family account of life in Britain in wartime is as varied and richly textured as any that exists. The thoughts of old and young, the centrally involved and the isolated, jostle continuously. This volume contains insights into the ways of government and workings of Whitehall, the position of the Church of England, and the problems of education among a vast conscript army. It is also a unique social document of the manner in which the disruptions and danger of life were coped with during wartime. Beautiful descriptions of the Kentish landscape the home guard was defending combine with harrowingly poignant accounts of air-raid shelters in the slums of London.

Bickersteth Family World War II Diary. Dear Grandmother ( Volume 2) 1942- 1945
2000 0-7734-7633-4
This family account of life in Britain in wartime is as varied and richly textured as any that exists. The thoughts of old and young, the centrally involved and the isolated, jostle continuously. This volume contains insights into the ways of government and workings of Whitehall, the position of the Church of England, and the problems of education among a vast conscript army. It is also a unique social document of the manner in which the disruptions and danger of life were coped with during wartime. Beautiful descriptions of the Kentish landscape the home guard was defending combine with harrowingly poignant accounts of air-raid shelters in the slums of London.

British Techniques of Public Relations and Propaganda for Mobilizing East and Central Africa During World War II
2000 0-7734-7805-1
This monograph presents a detailed account of how the British government developed new techniques of public relations and propaganda during the Second World War and in the early post-war period to mobilize the British empire in the war effort and in a new imperial relationship of partnership. Through the efforts of the Colonial Office and Ministry of Information, they used propaganda to explain the war to populations in the empire and exhort them to maximize their war effort, and to educate the British public about imperial contributions. Propaganda was employed in the United States to combat the threat posed by American anti-imperialism. It was also used to promote racial tolerance in Britain and the empire. After the war, the long-term educative process aimed to contain the political aspirations of the Africans and white settler communities in East and Central Africa.

Bureau of Motion Pictures and Its Influence on Film Content During World War II. The Reasons for Its Failure
1998 0-7734-8304-7
This book examines the United States government’s efforts to use the motion picture industry to aid the war effort and maintain high public morale during the Second World War.

Case of Japanese Americans During World War II
2004 0-7734-6450-6


Childhood in Germany During World War II: The Story of a Little Girl
1989 0-88946-354-9
Today a distinguished anthropologist, Karla Poewe was born in Koenigsberg, East Prussia, in 1941. In this autobiography she tells of her early life as a vagrant refugee pursued by Russian armies and Allied bombs. An unforgettable description of life as lived by a German child during the 1940s.

Childhood in the Third Reich World War II and Its Aftermath
2002 0-7734-3425-9


Controlling Information in U.S. Occupied Germany, 1945-1949
2003 0-7734-6775-0
This study examines the role of the United States Military Government’s Information Control Division in reestablishing the German media during the post-world War II occupation of Germany. It investigates the actions taken by ICD to reestablish the media, the use of the German media as outlets for American propaganda, and the nature of ongoing ICD control over the German media.

Daily Life of an Ordinary American Soldier During World War 2. The Letters of Wilbur C. Berget
2008 0-7734-4918-3
Written between 1941 and 1945, these personal, detailed letters serve as an important resource for World War II historians by illuminating the lives of ordinary soldiers.

Dead Feel No Pain. A Belarusian Novel of the Second World War by Vasil Bykau
2010 0-7734-3813-0
This book is one of few works by a Soviet writer that provides an honest portrayal of the life of a Soviet foot soldier on the Eastern front in World War II. Aside from the brilliant depiction of life at the front, it reveals how members of Stalin’s secret police transformed themselves into war heroes and began to resurrect Stalinism, following the War. Understandably, Bykau’s novel was res non grata and not published in its entirety until after the demise of the Soviet Union.

Destruction of the Ukrainian Jewry During World War II
2006 0-7734-5907-3
This book concentrates on the Holocaust in Southern and Southeastern Ukraine, as carried out by Nazi Germany and Antonescu’s Romania with the help of the local Ukrainians and ethnic German colonists. Topics such as the Jewish participation in resistance and opposition, collaboration among local inhabitants, and the interrelations of Jewish and non-Jewish population during the Holocaust will be emphasized.

The topic of the Jewish partisan activities comes under careful scrutiny. The difference will be drawn between the actual and alleged Jewish participation in the Soviet partisan movement, since under the pretext of anti-partisan counterattack, Wehrmacht, SS units and Einsatzgruppen were deployed in Ukraine to perform killing sprees on the Jews. Hundreds of thousands of Jews were murdered in the Ukraine under the cover of anti-partisan activities.

Two topics of particular concentration are the Crimean and Transnistrian Holocaust, both of which are unresearched subjects. The situation there was different from the other cities and towns in the Ukraine and thus requires further investigation and research. In Crimea, the Tatar anti-Semitism as well as the existence of two or more different Jewish separate groups, Karaites, Krimchaks and Rabbinical Jews, created a unique environment, which is analyzed in detailed discussion.

The Holocaust in Odessa, on the other hand, was carried out by the Romanians and not by Germans. The Romanian example is the only example of its kind in World War II. Romania was the only independent country directly involved in genocidal killing operations. The examination of the issues surrounding the willingness of Romanians to initiate and execute the killings is included. While the policies of the Romanian state were inspired by the widespread anti-Semitism, the petty bureaucrats were guided by greed and opportunity. The result of the latter led to the sufferings of many, but also opened a door of salvation for many others.

Did Japan Surrender Unconditionally? An Explanation of the Sucess that Japan Achieved at the End of the Second World War
2012 0-7734-3055-5
The book describes the severe consequences of going after an ‘unconditional surrender’ during WWII. Instead of intimidating the enemies, it infuriated them, and created an insurgent effect and ill-will that made picking up the pieces after the war all the more difficult. Whether or not Japan actually agreed to an unconditional surrender is contested in this book, precisely because Japanese leaders did not want to completely submit to outside influence after the war in a “Super Versailles” like scenario that would hold back progress indefinitely.

Did the Atomic Bomb Cause the Surrender of Japan? An Alternative Explanation of the End of World War II
2012 0-7734-3053-9
In this provocative book Hallett argues that dropping the atomic bomb on Japan had no impact on their surrender to America. What was more important was the threat of a Soviet and American invasion, and the Japanese government preferred to deal with America rather than have the Soviets turn the country communist.

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were certainly evil, but how evil? Evil in which way? Conventionally, their evil has been explained away by repeating that the atomic bombings ‘ended the war to save lives.’ If true, the evil was not truly evil. In this book, Professor Hallett challenges this all too comforting explanation. If lives were saved, then how many were saved, he asks? Did bombs cause the surrender of Japan; or was the Soviet involvement in the Pacific another influence among many that coincided with the end of the war? Reviewing the dramatic events of August, 1945, Hallett concludes that few, if any lives were saved and that the dropping of the atomic bombs was merely coincidental with the ending of the war. Instead, Soviet entry into the Pacific War was the immediate causal factor in the timing of the Japanese surrender. This study concludes that there was a banal evil induced by an ordinary lack of imagination on the part of President Truman and the American officials.

Eyewitness Accounts of the World War II Murmansk Run, 1941-1945
2006 0-7734-5800-X
This work is a collection of American eyewitness accounts of one of the most hazardous military operations of World War II - the Murmansk Run. From 1941 to 1945 convoys of U.S. merchant ships transported cargoes to the northern Russian ports of Murmansk, Archangel, and Molotovsk. The itinerary included the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Iceland, and the USSR. The convoys faced numerous mortal threats, often simultaneous, on their way to Russia. While in the USSR, crew members then had to contend with the many peculiarities of the Soviet environment. This work is a contribution to scholarship in that 1) the often unvarnished accounts are based on interviews conducted with both Merchant Marine and Navy veterans of the convoys; 2) the accounts detail not only combat operations, but also describe the interaction of U.S. personnel with the populace of Stalin’s Russia; 3) only one account in the collection has been previously published; and 4) the book includes previously unpublished photographs of wartime Murmansk. The collection should be of interest to libraries in the U.S, Canada, U.K., and Russian Federation, as well as to the general reading public.

How the Second World War is Depicted by British Novelists Since 1990
2012 0-7734-2615-9
This volume offers a study of sixteen novels by British authors published between 1990 and the present which address the topic of the Second World War. This study analyzes how these novels employ a variety of techniques and focus on private, anonymous individuals rather than the large historical events, to deal with recurring themes such as the repetitive nature of history and the impossibility of objective historiography.

Italian Women’s Narratives of Their Experiences During World War II
2003 0-7734-6880-3
This book provides an in-depth cultural study that will interest scholars in anthropology, women’s studies, and history. In particular it presents a study of Orsognese women’s narratives of their experience in World War II, presenting a detailed account of the author’s ethnographic field practice showing that the patterns that emerge from the narratives are an integral part of the contemporary Orsognese social context. It examines these as concepts of sociability, relatedness, and community, based on principles of social interaction the Orsognese women manifested in their social practice.

Remembering and Representing the Experience of War in Twentieth-Century France Committing to Memory
2000 0-7734-7458-7
This inter-disciplinary book draws together contributions by specialists in history, oral history and literature and focuses on the representation of the experience of war in 20th century France. It is concerned with aspects of cultural history and cultural memory as manifested in a variety of forms: public ceremonies, oral history and literary production. It examines the First and Second World Wars, the Occupation; collaboration and resistance.

Representations of World War II Refugee Experiences in Memoirs, Fiction, and Film
2012 0-7734-2556-X
A collection of essays that newly examines the experiences of German refugees in World War II. Studies include the use of diverse media

Resistance to the Persecution of Ethnic Minorities in Croatia and Bosnia During World War II
2009 0-7734-4745-8
During World War II, the Croatian ultra-nationalist Ustaa persecuted nearly two million Serbs, Jews, and Roma in the Independent State of Croatia (present-day Croatia and Bosnia). Political analysts today often cite this genocide as proof that ethnic violence within the region is inevitable. However, an equally important reality is that within just four years, Ustaa excesses had provoked a widespread popular reaction against the violence and the national exclusivity that inspired it.

Role the USS Casablanca (CVE 55) Played in World War II in the Pacific
2009 0-7734-3850-5
This book traces the history of the USS Casablanca (CVE-55) from her conception to her sale for scrap after the end of World War II. Her existence is placed in contexts of place and time as she served as a platform for training precommissioning crews of future sister ships and for pilots as they qualified for carrier duty, and then as she carried men, aircraft, and supplies into the Pacific and brought troops and damaged aircraft back to the West Coast. Casablanca’s history is told as seen through the eyes of the men who served aboard her; their stories were obtained mainly through personal interviews and memoirs.

Schooling of Japanese American Children at Relocation Centers During World War II. Miss Mabel Jamison and Her Teaching of Art at Rohwer, Arkansas
2005 0-7734-6149-3
The general story of education of Japanese Americans imprisoned in camps in this country during World War II has long been known. Little has been written, however, about the individual teachers who agreed to live and work with the students in the camps during the period of incarceration. The story of “Miss Jamison” and the education program in the prison camps at Rohwer and Jerome in Arkansas provides a fresh new view of a Caucasian teacher who came to work with a “strange” group of students, but who was herself educated in the process. Through evidence from Jamison’s papers, contemporary documents, historical accounts, interviews with survivors and even from the students’ art work Miss Jamison preserved, Ziegler creates a perceptive account of the wartime ordeal of the more than 110,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of them American citizens, from a unique point of view. This book is a moving and significant expansion of our knowledge of the human dimensions of a wartime tragedy.

Transformation of Arizona Into a Modern State
2002 0-7734-7206-1
This study covers Arizona’s homefront history during WWII, encompassing themes that are both institutional and social. It examines government, private industry and their economic programs, official policies of state and federal agencies. It examines the way Native Americans, Japanese aliens, and Japanese-Americans, Mexican-Americans and Mexican nationals, African-Americans, foreigners, international and local prisoners, children, and whites worked together – voluntarily or not – in the war effort.

United States and East Asia Since 1945
1990 0-88946-505-3
A synthesis of existing literature and interpretation of information on American foreign policy in East Asia since 1945, covering the last three major wars: World War II, the Korean conflict, and Vietnam.