Subject Area: World War I

Allied and American Naval Operations in the European Theater: World War I
1996 0-7734-8883-9
This book offers conclusions drawn from the study of the contributions of sea power to Allied/American victory in WWI. While naval strategy and tactics are considered, great emphasis has been placed upon the American bridge of ships that made logistic support for the Allies possible. Details have been garnered from the study of records in the Italian Naval History Office, British Naval Defense Library, and a host of American, British, French, and Italian archival and manuscript collections in addition to many secondary works and articles. Includes 48 pages of maps and photographs.

Anglo - German Correspondence of Vernon Lee and Irene Forbes-Mosse During World War I. Women Writers' Friendship Transcending Enemy Lines
2014 0-7734-4313-4
This recently discovered cache of letters, skillfully and devotedly edited by Sieberg and Zorn, provides us with new insight into the powerful story of the enduring friendship of two women writers from enemy nations and their intellectual yet heartfelt correspondence, describing the events and challenges of The Great War from a clearly women’s perspective, outside the confines of the suppressive public sphere of censorship and propaganda.

Bibliography of the First World War in the Far East and Southeast Asia
2003 0-7734-6662-2
This bibliography brings together 1491 sources – books, magazines, theses, newspaper articles, and unpublished manuscripts which contribute to the understanding of the First World War in the region. Topics include the battle of Tsingtao in China, developments in China and Japan, the German naval presence in the region, the Singapore Mutiny, etc. Indices cover Asian countries and cities, subjects, themes and genres, military units, and names, which will allow scholars to locate published and unpublished material for their research.

British Strategic Bombing Policy From World War I Through 1940. Politics, Attitudes, and the Formation of a Lasting Pattern
1989 0-88946-464-2
Traces British governmental thought, policy, and action regarding strategic bombing from World War I to the end of 1940, the year in which the relatively unprofitable area-bombing campaign began. Policy-making at both the cabinet level and top level of the RAF is examined.

Collapse of Philosophy and Its Rebirth
2006 0-7734-5594-9
This monograph can be called a forensic study of the lethal effects of the First World War on the European cultural tradition. Philosophy was considered as the foundation of that tradition. The monograph describes this metamorphosis taking as the case study of the problem of the individual, this “nucleus of genuinely German thought” (Troeltsch). The monograph contains a critical analysis of the problem of the individual as it was treated in the 1900s by the pure phenomenology of Edmund Husserl and the transcendental axiology of Heinrich Rickert. Mikhail Bakhtin creates a new approach to the problem of the individual bringing together and transforming the ideas of Marx and Stirner, Lotze and Nietzsche, Simmel and Windelband, William James and Max Weber. The present study may be the first step to demonstrate the potential of Bakhtin’s early work which remains largely undiscovered.

First World War in Africa: A Bibliography
2008 0-7734-5132-3
This work addresses the lack of research on events in Africa during the First World War. The author cites nearly two thousand articles, archives, books, journals, and government and public records related to the topic, all of which are subject to four extensive indices providing comprehensive cross references.

Martha Dickinson Bianchi (1866-1943): An American Poet of the First World War
2015 1-4955-0315-1
An important and engaging study of the original work and writings of Martha Dickinson Bianchi, the niece of poet Emily Dickinson. This book establishes Martha as a prolific poet, novelist, essayist and translator. As we approach the 100th anniversary of the Great War, this study will help us to rethink how women experienced that war by identifying a significant woman poet who published during the first two decades of the 20th century but whose work has largely been ignored.

Mustering of Support for World War I by the Ladies' Home Journal
1997 0-7734-2250-1
Concentrates mainly on the visual ways in which The Ladies' Home Journal conveyed the Journal's political and social views in its wartime editions. It demonstrates how the editor, Edward Bok, orchestrated elements of his magazine to serve his editorial vision, namely that the United States should be involved in the Great War, and in enlisting the active support of the readers.

Remembering and Representing the Experience of War in Twentieth-Century France Committing to Memory
2000 0-7734-7458-7
This inter-disciplinary book draws together contributions by specialists in history, oral history and literature and focuses on the representation of the experience of war in 20th century France. It is concerned with aspects of cultural history and cultural memory as manifested in a variety of forms: public ceremonies, oral history and literary production. It examines the First and Second World Wars, the Occupation; collaboration and resistance.

Source Records of World War I Volume 1. How the Great War Arose
1997 0-7734-8559-7
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Source Records of World War I Volume 3. 1915 - Germany's Year of Triumph
1997 0-7734-8563-5
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Source Records of World War I Volume 4. 1916 -
1997 0-7734-8565-1
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Source Records of World War I Volume 5. 1917 - America Roused at Last
1997 0-7734-8567-8
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Source Records of World War I Volume 6. 1918 - The Year of Victory
1997 0-7734-8569-4
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Source Records of World War I Volume 7. 1919 - Reconstruction and Peace Treaty
1997 0-7734-8571-6
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Source Records of World War I, Volume 2. 1914 - The Red Dawning of 'der tag'
1997 0-7734-8561-9
A reprint of the 1923 definitive series Source Records of the Great War. Presenting documents from government archives and other authoritative sources, with outlines, narratives, indices, chronologies, and courses of reading on sociological movements and individual national activities. Includes texts of speeches, cartoons, maps.

Student Life at the University of California, Berkeley During and After World War I
2006 0-7734-5797-6
Three hundred letters by Agnes Edwards, a student at UC Berkeley, comprise this volume that covers the years 1917 to 1921. The letters, written faithfully to her parents once a week, encompass some important national themes: World War I, the Spanish influenza epidemic, and the first U.S. election in which women could vote. They reveal the crossroads that America was facing in those years, such as the horse and buggy vs. the automobile in civilian life, and horses and mules vs. airplanes and tanks in warfare. In communication, letter writing was being eroded by the telephone, and in entertainment, vaudeville was losing its audience to silent movies. Agnes lived every day at this crossroads. She was also deeply immersed in the “golden age of UC,” where there was a family spirit on campus. As evidence of this, Agnes describes the students’ frequent gatherings around the Campanile to sing “All Hail,” the university hymn. She discusses her courses, her studying until the wee hours, the scholarships she earned, and her aspirations to be elected Phi Beta Kappa. She tells of the creative stunt parties and pranks at Mrs. Allen’s boarding house and later at the Alpha Gamma Delta house, hikes and picnics in the Berkeley hills, and her partners on the dance floor. But Agnes was that rarest of all co-eds, the resident of a sorority house who was also entirely self-supporting. Most of the 300 letters contain at least one paragraph telling of her work in California Hall as secretary to the Dean of the Summer Session, Walter Morris Hart, and she frequently mentions her anxieties about the low pay. To supplement her income, she tutored a young Russian boy, worked as a T.A. in English 1X, and corrected blue books for two professors. Agnes’ eyewitness impressions of celebrities, such as U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, help to make this volume of letters interesting to historians, while her observations and detailed descriptions of her experiences constitute a valuable contribution to scholarship.

Women, the First World War and the Dramatic Imagination International Essays (1914-1999)
2000 0-7734-7455-2
Part of the significance of this collection of essays comes from its geographical and historical spread: it ranges globally across drama from France, Germany and Australia as well as UK and USA, and it demonstrates the continuing effects of the war o the cultural memories of the disparate nations involved, including Ireland, Germany, Canada and Scotland at the end of the 20th century. It not only makes available original historical research, the results of delving in the police censorship archives in Paris and in the Birmingham Reference Library’s Great War collection, it also demonstrates the fruitfulness of carious critical approaches.