Subject Area: Suicide

Comparative Survey of Suicide in Scandinavia, Asia, Africa, United States
2009 0-7734-4781-4
This anthropological study examines cultural attitudes and public policies around the world toward suicide.

Literature on Suicide 1516-1815, A Bibliographical Essay
1996 0-7734-8809-X
This bibliographical essay is intended as a contribution to the history of ideas in the broadest sense and as an aid to new studies on suicide in early modern Europe. It includes items which can be considered as substantial steps, whether in a progressive or conservative direction, in the theoretical debate on suicide in this period. Monographic works make up the majority of the entries, and the author has added some commentary to those items which seemed to merit it, on account of their originality or because they are turning-points in the ideological debate on the subject.

Making Sense of the Jonestown Suicides. A Sociological History of the Peoples Temple
1984 0-88946-871-0
An interpretive study of the sociological phenomena of Jonestown.

Metaphoric Analysis of the Debate on Physician Assisted Suicide
1999 0-7734-8041-2
Uses metaphoric analysis to explore the rhetorical aspects of the debate as represented in the published works of three physicians with opposing views: Dr. C. Everett Koop, Dr. Jack Kevorkian, and Dr. Timothy Quill. After examining the texts, the author invents a hybrid metaphorical concept which can serve as a rhetorical bridge for participants in the debate. Once this metaphorical means of communication is in place, the necessary exploration of ethical systems can occur. Spragins goes well into the rhetorically unexplored territory of the debate on physician assisted suicide, illustrating in every argument how metaphor figures on thinking and speaking about the human mode of perceiving and being.

New Religious Movements, Mass Suicide, and Peoples Temple. Scholarly Perspectives on a Tragedy
1989 0-88946-680-7
The first definitive, scholarly study of the Jonestown tragedy; a collection of essays written by leading authorities in the field.

Role of American Christian and Japanese Buddhist Clergy in Suicide Prevention
2012 0-7734-2603-5
The purpose of this study is to examine American and Japanese clergy’s perception of their role in the prevention of suicide. The research questions are: (1) How do clergy in the US and Japan perceive suicide?; (2) Do they see suicide differently?; and (3) How do they envision the role of suicide prevention? The hypotheses are: (A) Christian clergy think that suicide is an unacceptable “sin;” (B) Buddhist clergy are more accepting of suicide than Christian clergy; and (C) There are role differences related to suicide prevention in the Japanese and American religious communities; and (D) American and Japanese religious leaders have a different view of their obligations related to suicide prevention. The investigator sent 400 anonymous mail surveys respectively to New York and Tokyo. The surveys asked about the clergy’s personal beliefs and the Church’s role in suicide prevention. The investigator analyzed the responses using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The major findings are that many American Christian clergy consider suicide to be a sin; but that “God’s love is available for people who committed suicide.” Many Japanese Buddhist clergy think how one dies is not the most important issue.

Suicide. The Constructive-Destructive Self
1996 0-7734-8830-8
This volume deals with the destructive behavior of suicidal young adults and older ages, with emphasis on youth in our society. It explores the early theories of Freud and Durkheim, along with the research of Schneidman, Farberow, Litman, Henry, and Short, Jr. Later research findings include Lester, Stone, Gibbs, Hogerman, Giannini, Slaby, and others. Examines the concepts of Holistic Health and Wellness, the impact of lifestyle, stress, life crises, and loss. It includes constructive lifestyle recommendations. The final chapter discusses the reality of death, the practice of euthanasia, and the right to die. This book is available at a textbook price

Why Nurses Commit Suicide. Mobbing in Health Care Institutions
2014 0-7734-0068-0
The first English translation of the seminal work of Dr. Heinz Leymann. The term workplace mobbing, or the ganging up of peers and managers against a workmate, was conceptualized by a single scientist, Heinz Leymann in his research to identify a distinct form of collective workplace aggression that has now opened the door to specialization in the field of mobbing and laid the groundwork for its subsequent policies and laws governing human resource management departments globally.