Subject Area: Slavery-Global

1855 Murder Case of Missouri v. Celia
2010 0-7734-3528-X
This book reconstructs the conviction of a slave girl found guilty of beating and burning to death her owner, the man who fathered her three children. The political climate of pre-Civil War Missouri did not favor justice for an enslaved girl who confessed to murdering her owner, even though those acquainted with the case believed she could not have committed the deed.

African Institution (1807-1827) and the Anti-slavery Movement in Great Britain
2005 0-7734-6129-9
The African Institution was a pivotal abolitionist and antislavery group in Britain during the early nineteenth century, and its members included royalty, prominent lawyers, Members of Parliament, and noted reformers such as William Wilberforce, Thomas Clarkson, and Zachary Macaulay. Focusing on the spread of Western civilization to Africa, the abolition of the foreign slave trade, and improving the lives of slaves in British colonies, the group's influence extended far into Britain's diplomatic relations in addition to the government's domestic affairs. The African Institution carried the torch for antislavery reform for twenty years and paved the way for later humanitarian efforts in Great Britain. This book is the only monograph on the African Institution, and thus the only specific book length analysis of its successes and failures. The 20-year period of its existence was a crucial transitional period for the antislavery movement, and the book adds to a relatively sparse body of research on that particular time period.

Archival Records of the African Slave Trade to Mexico at Santiago El Pescador, 1692-1799
2013 0-7734-4090-9
These are archival records tracking the slave trade in Tamiahua, Mexico. It documents the early stages of slavery in Mexico which due to the introduction of new diseases brought a significant reduction in the indigenous population. The eventual effects of the population shortages combined with other negative aspects of the conquest caused the Spanish to look elsewhere to supplement their labor force and maintain productivity, which included importing slaves.

Atlantic Slave Trade: Empire, Enlightenment, and the Cult of the Unthinking Negro
2008 0-7734-5197-8
This work explores the interrelationship between the institutionalized political philosophical construction and reproduction of European anti-African hatred within the Western Academy and the birth and reproduction of European imperialism. Both projects grounded a part of their ideological foundation in the cultivation and reproduction of the myth of the ‘unthinking Negro.'

Black Ordeal of Slavery and Slave Trading in the French West Indies, 1625-1715 the Black Ordeal of Slavery and Slave Trading in the French West Indies, 1625-1715 Volume 1
1991 0-7734-9741-2
Along with reflections on the slavery-capitalism-racism causal chain, this book reveals the tight bond between the Black West Indies and Africa through analysis of socio-political conditions in Africa, and of the ethnic origins of diaspora Africans. The years from 1625 to 1715 are the time when the scaffolding of the plantation slave economy was erected. It triggered the dialectic between the slave mode of extracting surplus labor from captive Africans on the one side, and the profit exigencies of nascent capitalism, on the other. This dialectic made the installation of the capitalist mode of production in the western hemisphere a peculiarly racist phenomenon. This book seeks to show also that the lasting community of Blacks which emerged in the French West Indies during those years was permanently conditioned by this dialectic. The period from 1625-1715 has been neglected.

Black Ordeal of Slavery and Slave Trading in the French West Indies, 1625-1715 the Black Ordeal of Slavery and Slave Trading in the French West Indies, 1625-1715 Volume 3
1992 0-7734-9433-2
Along with reflections on the slavery-capitalism-racism causal chain, this book reveals the tight bond between the Black West Indies and Africa through analysis of socio-political conditions in Africa, and of the ethnic origins of diaspora Africans. The years from 1625 to 1715 are the time when the scaffolding of the plantation slave economy was erected. It triggered the dialectic between the slave mode of extracting surplus labor from captive Africans on the one side, and the profit exigencies of nascent capitalism, on the other. This dialectic made the installation of the capitalist mode of production in the western hemisphere a peculiarly racist phenomenon. This book seeks to show also that the lasting community of Blacks which emerged in the French West Indies during those years was permanently conditioned by this dialectic. The period from 1625-1715 has been neglected.

Black Resistance Movements in the United States and Africa, 1800-1993. Oppression and Retaliation
1995 0-7734-9053-1
This collection of new interdisciplinary studies focuses on black resistance patterns in literature, humor, art, cinema, history, and science, from the antebellum South to contemporary Brooklyn. Essays include: Elderly Female Slaves of the Antebellum South: Stabilizers and Resisters (Stacey K. Close); Throwing Off the Slaveholder: Free Black Ohioans and the Civil War (Felton O. Best); Resistance to European Conquest of Africa (Don C. Ohadike); 'Ode to Ethiopia': Challenging the Color Line Through Alliance Building, Yet Preserving the Soul, the Early Resistance Strategy of Paul Laurence Dunbar (Felton O. Best); Causes of the Atlanta Riot of 1906 (Gregory Mixon); The Protest Against 'Insult': Black Soldiers, World War II, and the 'War' for 'Democracy' at Home (Joyce Thomas); Ambivalent Allies: African Americans and American Jews After World War II (Cheryl Greenburg); Malcolm X, David Walker, and William Lloyd Garrison: Gaining Freedom "By Any Means Necessary" (Donald M. Jacobs); Resisting European Christianity: The Rise of Black Holiness-Pentecostal Culture in Brooklyn (Clarence Taylor); African-American Humor: Resistance and Retaliation (Joseph Boskin); Completing the Picture: African Americans and Independent Cinema: An Urban Genre Case Study (Marshall Hyatt).

Comparative Study of Societal Influences on Indigenous Slavery in Two Types of Societies in Africa 1600-1950
2002 0-7734-7225-8


Demise of Slavery in Southwestern Morocco, 1860-2000: Economic Modernization and Transformation of Social Hierarchy
2011 0-7734-1460-6
This book examines the changes that occurred in the Moroccan social hierarchy from the pre-Protectorate to the post-Independence period (1860 -2000). It argues that the actions of slaves encouraged changes in the institution of slavery. These changes combined with the forces of economic modernization to reshape social configurations in nineteenth century Morocco. The study draws heavily on Arabic, Berber and French archival and oral data collected in France and Morocco. This book contains 12 color photographs.

Entrapment of the Poor Into Involuntary Labor: Understanding the Worldwide Practice of Modern-Day Slavery
2008 0-7734-5046-2
Examines the factors which facilitate modern-day slavery (MDS) and prescribes a realistic intervention strategy to counter its practice at all levels of government and society.

Fugitive Slave Law in The Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave and Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin: American Society Transforms Its Culture
2013 0-7734-4518-8
This book shows how abolitionists used rhetoric and discourse, rather than violence, to change opinions about slavery. Books like Uncle Tom’s Cabin incite people to take action and they provoke a sense of urgency about the matter. Less than a decade before an impending civil war the United States enacted the Compromise of 1850, which among other things revived the Fugitive Slave Law of 1793 in a more aggravated form. The main stipulation of the law was to impose strict monetary and legal penalties against those who aided the escape or impeded the capture of fugitive slaves. Frederick Douglass and Harriet Beecher Stowe urged Americans to break the Fugitive Slave Law and free blacks across America. These are the most important texts from the American Antebellum Era that dealt with slavery and emancipation. This book explores the implications of the Fugitive Slave Law and the impact that these two figures had during that time period in American history. The argument is that Douglass and Stowe used language instead of violence to convince Americans to break the law, and that not all Americans agreed with the law.

How Slave Narratives Influenced American Literature. A Source for Herman Melville’s Billy Budd
2009 0-7734-4826-8
This study investigates how Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville depict patterns of human resistance to domination in institutions like slavery and in practices like impressment.

Just Defense of the Natural Freedom of Slaves
2007 0-7734-5504-3
Awarded the Adele Mellen Prize for Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship

This book offers a critical Latin text with English, facing-page translation of Epifanio de Moirans's Servi Liberi seu Naturalis Mancipiorum Libertatis Iusta Defensio. The events described in Servi Liberi occurred in Havana, Cuba toward the end of 1681 and the beginning of 1682. It was then that the author, de Moirans, a Frenchman from Burgundy, along with Francisco José de Jaca, a Spaniard from Aragon and fellow Capuchin, did what was most impossible and subversive at the time: he condemned the very institution of slavery. The only extant copy of Servi Liberi is in Seville’s Archivo General de Indias, which, though formerly a stock exchange, became the official depository for Spanish colonial documents over two hundred years ago. Servi Liberi has survived because of the Archive; had it perished, we would have no knowledge of these events, no awareness of these campaigns, and no idea of how two Capuchins struggled with all the established political, economic, and religious interests of their time to change the widespread and destructive practice of slavery.

Kentucky Abolitionists in the Midst of Slavery (1854-1864). Exiles for Freedom
1993 0-7734-9309-3
An examination of the relationship between the lives and thought of Cassius M. Clay and Rev. John G. Fee, Kentucky's most famous and controversial antislavery leaders. It provides the most thorough treatment yet written of Fee's thinking in relation to his background and experiences, and by far the most complete estimation of influences on his religious convictions. It presents a detailed account of virtually all the abolitionists active in Kentucky from 1854-1864, including leaders and followers, both out of state and indigenous. Includes a complete narrative of the founding of Berea, KY as an abolitionist colony, and information about the first, abortive establishment of what is now Berea College. Relates the events after John Brown's Harpers Ferry raid when all the KY abolitionists were forced into exile by vigilante mobs. Follows Fee and others up to the point of his return to the mission field in Kentucky in 1864.

Origins and Structures of Political Institutions in Pre-Colonial Black Africa: Dynastic Monarchy, Taxes and Tributes, War and Slavery, Kinship and Territory
2009 0-7734-4718-0
This book examines the states of pre-colonial Sub-Saharan Africa – their different origins and institutions, their evolution and development, and the enduring strength of their traditions in present-day Africa. This book contains nineteen black and white photographs and four black and white maps.

Religious Dancing of American Slaves, 1820-1865. Spiritual Ecstasy at Baptisms, Funerals, and Sunday Meetings
2008 0-7734-4926-4
In contrast to recent historiography, this work reasserts the argument that slaves were not merely the victims of a brutal regime, but lived largely separate lives within a distinct sphere.

Representations of American Slavery in Post-Civil Rights Fiction and Film
2009 0-7734-4739-3
This study discusses representations of slavery in post-civil-rights fiction and film as reflections of public policy and opinion concerning race in the United States. These texts and films are used to discuss the twentieth-century historiography of slavery, tying together popular culture and historical studies to important political and cultural events and trends.

Slavery and the French Revolutionists 1788-1805
1988 0-88946-637-8
The first translation and publication of a 1925 doctoral dissertation written for the University of Paris by a 67-year-old Black American expatriate woman who had been born a slave. Her study of the French revolutionists' view of slavery is crucial to understanding the growth of human rights.

Structural Analysis of Enslavement in the African Diaspora
2001 0-7734-7435-8
This assembly of essays probes the enslavement of African people from an interdisciplinary perspective. It examines Europe, the Caribbean, the United States, and indentured servitude in Africa itself. “In sum, Dr. Conyers’ research in this manuscript is groundbreakin, seeking to provide a greater breadth and depth of insight on enslavement from the standpoint of the Africa. . . . he has simultaneously set a high standards for scholarly research in both the academy and the discipline of Africana Studies while offering a thoughtful view of the Africana experience from the standpoint of African people’s plight in enslavement worldwide.” – Andrew P. Smallwood

Sudan’s Civil War - Slavery, Race and Formational Identities
2001 0-7734-7619-9
The civil war in the Sudan has been generally misunderstood in the Sudanese and Western academic worlds as war between an Arab Muslim North and an African Christian South. This work examines how ‘African’ and ‘Arab’, as competing racial identities, have been produced in the Sudan, and interprets the roles of various actors with different interests in creating these identities.

White Calvinists Fighting Against Black Slavery Before the Ratification of the American Constitution. A Collection of Eighteenth- Century Documents
2016 1-4955-0499-9
Professor Richard Hall has gathered the 18th-century Edwardsean anti-slavery writings that are presented in this book. Note that John Brown, a white man who sacrificed his life to free black slaves, had read these very documents and they influenced his decision to do what he did.

White Slave Owners Breeding and Selectively Breeding themselves with their Black Female Slaves and Girls. Why Black Americans are Not Descendants of Africans or African Slaves
2014 0-7734-4487-4
Contrary to prior scientific and popular belief over slavery, this book explicitly and unequivocally demonstrates that the majority of Black Americans of the 20th and 21st Centuries do not have African slave heritage history. These descendants are neither Black Americans nor African Americans, but White because of their paternal ancestry as a result of the selective breeding practices of White slave owners with their Black female slaves.

Women's Participation in the British Antislavery Movement, 1824-1865
1993 0-7734-9294-1
As was true of many 19th-century reforms, the anti-slavery movement drew upon women's perceived special attributes: her moral superiority, her role as guardian of the purity of family and society, her spiritual standing in the religious community. Drawn together by their moral conviction of the evil of slavery, middle-class women from around Great Britain forged an active role for themselves in combatting chattel slavery. Their involvement was of great significance, allowing middle-class woman to work outside her home in a sphere of activity that encouraged her to exercise her initiative and translate moral principle into effective action. The crusade also established the mechanisms of organization and the rhetoric of emancipation which later female reformers would draw upon in the movement for their own rights.

World the Slave Owners and Their Female Slaves Made. The Peculiar Affinity
2014 0-7734-0089-3
Contrary to prior scientific and popular belief over slavery, this book explicitly and unequivocally demonstrates that the majority of Black Americans of the 20th and 21st Centuries do not have African slave heritage history. These descendants are neither Black Americans nor African Americans, but White because of their paternal ancestry as a result of the selective breeding practices of White slave owners with their Black female slaves.