Subject Area: Scripture- New Testament Study

Albrecht Ritschl and the Problem of the Historical Jesus
1992 0-7734-9822-2
This study reappraises Albrecht Ritschl and represents a fresh perspective on his work, through his study and use of the canonical Gospels. Ritschl's concern for theological responsibility when interpreting the life of Jesus is noted and explored in a discussion of the New Testament canon and the problem of the christological diversity found within the Gospel tradition.

An Examination and Critique of the Understanding of the Relationship Between Apocalypticism and Gnosticism in Johannine Studies
1997 0-7734-2282-X
This study describes, criticizes, and corrects an assumption (that apocalyptic eschatology had no place in Gnosticism) frequently employed by Johannine scholars. It explores the assumption's background in Apocalypticism, and in the light of six Nag Hammadi tractates. It then summarizes conclusions and offers additional information in appendices. It describes a trend in apocalyptic studies and hopes to contribute a more accurate portrait of Apocalypticism within Gnosticism.

An Exegesis of Apostasy embedded in John’s Narratives of Peter and Judas against the Synoptic Parallels
2004 0-7734-6404-2
This study of apostasy in the Johannine writings contributes to filling in the vacuum of scholarship regarding apostasy in the New Testament. The perennial debate between the Arminians and Calvinists over the question has been based on their respective systematic theological presupposition whether it emphasizes freedom of human will or God’s predestination. This study serves to show how John would have understood them in his historical context, and thus affirms a well-known hermeneutic principle that a historical reconstruction must be born out from within the text rather than by imposing the interpreter’s own frame of presuppositions.

An Exegetical and Theological analysis of the Son’s relationship to the Father in John’s Gospel. Equal yet Subordinate
2015 1-4955-0306-2
John's Gospel is generally regarded as the clearest and boldest affirmation of Jesus' deity in the New Testament. Yet John also highlights Jesus'subordination to the Father more than any other New Testament writer. The profundity of this phenomenon has not been lost on Johannine scholarship. For nearly two millennia various approaches to the problem have been proposed by biblical scholars and theologians - often stressing equality at the expense of subordination, or vice versa.

Anti-Language in the Apocalypse of John
1993 0-7734-9839-7
Anti-language is defined as language that is antithetical to the norm society. Four of the practical functions of anti-language are secrecy, verbal play, group solidarity, and creation and maintainance of an alternative social and conceptual reality. The study presents an overview of the social realia and of the social location of thought of the Apocalypse of John, which is viewed as following certain cultural scripts. There is an overview of Halliday's sociosemiotic theory and an analysis of four theorists of anti-language -- Halliday, Kress, Fowler, and Malina. Draws together the two theoretical components of social location of thought and sociolinguistics and used the Apocalypse of John 11:19 - 15:4 as a test case to discern the presence of anti-language.

Assessing the New Testament Evidence for the Historicity of the Resurrection of Jesus
1989 0-88946-616-5
Draws on the evidence of Paul and the Gospels to present the case for accepting the historicity of the bodily resurrection of Jesus.

Biblical Missiological Exploration of the Cross Cultural Dimensions in Luke-Acts
1993 0-7734-2212-9
Using the best insights from the disciplines of biblical studies and missiology, this study explores the extent to which cross-cultural insights can be drawn from Luke's story of Christianity as it moves from the particular (the Jews) to the universal (Jew and Gentile). Luke's narrative, while cast in religious categories, contains numerous implications on the cross-cultural nature of the messianic movement because the terms he uses have sociological dimensions. The study's conclusions will interest both New Testament scholars and missiologists.

Bibliography for the Gospel of Mark, 1954-1980
1981 0-88946-916-4
Indexes journal articles, essays in collected works, and books in all languages under seven general headings. Items (total: 1599) are listed under a minute classification system, and within each class they are listed in reverse chronological order. There are many cross references and a complete (11-page) author index.

Book of Acts According to Alexander Campbell an Historical and Rhetorical Commentary - Book 1
2002 0-7734-7026-3
Alexander Campbell was a 19th century religious reformer and founder of three major denominations, The Churches of Christ, The Disciples of Christ and The Christian Churches. This study collects his comments on each Book of Acts in the New Testament.

Each chapter begins with Campbell's translations of one chapter of Acts, followed verse by his verse-by-verse comments, keyed to the King James Version. Also included are occasional comments showing how Campbell appealed to these verses in his many controversies. Extensive footnotes direct the scholar to parallel comments and allows historians to study his sources and influences, and biblical scholars to evaluate his contributions.

Book of Acts According to Alexander Campbell an Historical and Rhetorical Commentary - Book 2
2002 0-7734-7028-X
Alexander Campbell was a 19th century religious reformer and founder of three major denominations, The Churches of Christ, The Disciples of Christ and The Christian Churches. This study collects his comments on each Book of Acts in the New Testament.

Each chapter begins with Campbell's translations of one chapter of Acts, followed verse by his verse-by-verse comments, keyed to the King James Version. Also included are occasional comments showing how Campbell appealed to these verses in his many controversies. Extensive footnotes direct the scholar to parallel comments and allows historians to study his sources and influences, and biblical scholars to evaluate his contributions.

Book of Acts According to Alexander Campbell an Historical and Rhetorical Commentary - Book 3
2002 0-7734-7030-1
Alexander Campbell was a 19th century religious reformer and founder of three major denominations, The Churches of Christ, The Disciples of Christ and The Christian Churches. This study collects his comments on each Book of Acts in the New Testament.

Each chapter begins with Campbell's translations of one chapter of Acts, followed verse by his verse-by-verse comments, keyed to the King James Version. Also included are occasional comments showing how Campbell appealed to these verses in his many controversies. Extensive footnotes direct the scholar to parallel comments and allows historians to study his sources and influences, and biblical scholars to evaluate his contributions.

Brief Commentary on the Gospel of John
1992 0-7734-2346-X
This well-written, concise guide integrates the best insights in biblical research to explain essential points of this profound Gospel. A major emphasis is two-fold; to make clear the meaning of Jesus for John, and how John understands the words and deeds of Jesus to give`life to the fullest'. Also relates the Gospel to the social situations which gave rise to it. This reliable commentary will be of great use to college theology classes, bible study groups, homilists, and retreat directors.

Brief Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew
1992 0-7734-2350-8
This book explains the various contributions the Gospel makes to moral teachings, to the understanding of Jesus, to the significance of the church of Jesus, to the manner in which this church relates to the Israel from which it came, and to the Jewish scriptures. As well, the commentator draws attention to elements which distinguish it from the Gospels of Mark and Luke. This readable and coherent commentary will be of great use to college theology classes, bible study groups, homilists, and retreat directors.

Centrality of Aima (Blood) in the Theology of the Epistle to the Hebrews. An Exegetical and Philological Study
2012 0-7734-1461-4
This book demonstrates that because blood sanctifies, consecrates and purifies, the Greek word for blood provided the best expression for the unique role of Christ as self-sacrificing High Priest in the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Comparative Analysis of the Gospel Genre. The Synoptic Mode and Its Uniqueness
1992 0-7734-9460-X
This work addresses itself to four interrelated questions: 1) What was the primary source of power that generated the Gospels? 2) To what extent do the Gospels represent a unique literary genre? 3) Does the Gospel genre permit us to talk seriously about the historical Jesus? 4) How do the Synoptic Gospels relate to the large body of literature describing the lives and teachings of the many highly revered, phrase-making itinerant teachers, healers and doers of miracles in the ancient world? The book's chief contribution is its application of some novel methodology called "Content Analysis" which produces an entirely new dimension of primary evidence for the examination of the problem of Synoptic origins. This throws a fresh light upon the entire discussion, and produces some new insights. Because of its original approach and the new data it produces, this book will be of great interest to research libraries and Synoptic scholars.

Comparison of Greek Words in Philo and the New Testament
2003 0-7734-6774-2
This volume presents a complete computer-generated comparison of the Greek New Testament and the extant Greek writings of Philo of Alexandria. It is a statistical counting and registration of all common words in these writings. It is based upon the database gathered in connection with the Norwegian Philo Concordance Project, headed by Prof. Peder Borgen. This list will be useful for all New Testament scholars interested in the Jewish and Greco-Roman background of the New Testament.

Critical Tools for the Study of the New Testament
1995 0-7734-2405-9
"Every serious student of the New Testament needs the information supplied . . . Mills informs students of the myriad of books used by experienced scholars: bibliographies of bibliographies, periodicals, indexing and abstracting resources, book reviews, information on dissertations and theses, dictionaries, commentaries, works on archaeology, texts of the New Testament, grammars, lexicons, concordances, synopses, and the computer in New Testament Studies. The volume in encyclopedic in scope, attempting to list the major resources presently available, especially those in English, German, and French. . . . Students are not simply provided lists; they are provided introductory interpretive commentary and suggestions. In the chapter on bibliography, for example, Mills distinguishes the sorts of bibliographies and their uses and then gives a brief description of each of different bibliographies of bibliographies in English, German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian. The thirty-eight most important periodicals in New Testament studies are listed and discussed. Twenty-five different resources for abstracts, indexes and locating book reviews are included. . . . unquestionably the best guide available." - Edgar V. McKnight

Cultic Motif in the Spirituality of the Book of Hebrews
1993 0-7734-2376-1
This book begins with the assumption that cultus in Hebrews is a mode of discourse whereby the author intends to communicate something important about his conceptualization of Christian existence. He is seen to be quite at home with the attitudes and assumptions about ritual common in pre-industrial societies, and the work concludes that the Hebrews was in fact written as a pastoral response to a need for cultic religious expression. Given the supreme importance of cultic religious expression in antiquity, for Christians to find themselves without an external cultus presented a grave crisis of faith. They study examines why cultus boasts such a central role in pre-industrial religion, and then offers some suggestions toward incorporating the cultically-centered spirituality of Hebrews into modern Christian devotion.

Exegetical Study of the Nuptial Symbolism in Matthew 9:15
2006 0-7734-5811-5
This work offers an ample view of how Matthew 9:15 has been interpreted in the course of the centuries, beginning from Origen up to the present day, bringing a more contemporary interpretation to light. This work provides stimulus to the discussion about the right interpretation of the parables about a rich text such as Matthew 9:15.

Finding and translating the Oral-Aural elements in written language. The case of the New Testament Epistles
2008 0-7734-4959-0
This book examines the interlingual, cross-cultural transmission of the Bible in contemporary languages, underscoring the importance of employing a context-based methodology in translation.

First Corinthians 1-4 in Light of Jewish Wisdom Traditions. Christ, Wisdom, and Spirituality
2000 0-7734-7833-7
This book examines the influence of Jewish wisdom traditions on Pauls thought and theology. It also evaluates background sources and contains an excellent bibliography on wisdom literature.

Gathering of the Gospels From Papyrus to Printout
1997 0-7734-2427-X
This book examines the planning and production of the original copies of the four gospels and Acts. It provides much new information about these books and the relations between them. The progression from first to last is shown to be a logical sequence of addition and expansion.

Gospel of Mark
2006 0-7734-5553-1
This bibliography surveys works published on the Gospel of Mark from 1980 through 2005 – books, essays and articles. Journal articles are cross-referenced to their abstracts in New Testament Abstracts and, in many cases, references are given to reviews of books. The works of almost 1,500 authors extend to over 3,700 entries. The strongest aspect of this work is its indexing of the materials, which not only allows scholars to find materials directly pertinent to their work but also indicates the new directions the study of the Gospel of Mark has taken during the last quarter century. While works by scholars, for scholars, and in scholarly journals comprise the largest part of this bibliography, materials written to interpret that scholarship for a larger audience are also included.

Gospel of Mark as Midrash on Earlier Jewish and New Testament Literature
1990 0-88946-621-1
A contribution to the leading edge of Gospel studies, based on the methodology of comparative midrash, with commentary on Mark pericope by pericope.

Gospel of Matthew with Patristic Commentaries
1999 0-7734-8228-8
This translation of The Gospel of Matthew with its Greek and English parallel text format and appendix of Patristic Commentary is intended to offer the reader a glimpse into the past of the church – its first seven centuries, to be exact – the Apostolic, Subapostolic, and Patristic periods, which attract Christians of all persuasions like a lodestone.

Guide to the Hebrew Bible in the Gospel of Mark
2014 0-7734-0065-6
This contextual disclosure of the extensive underlay of canonical Hebrew scripture within the Marcan narrative will promote further exploration of intertextuality within the Bible. It will serve to allow greater appreciation of the pervasive influence of the Hebrew bible on Mark's gospel and will provide prompt access to the nature of his hermeneutics.

History and Critique of Scholarship concerning the Markan Endings
1993 0-7734-2380-X
This volume surveys and evaluates the scholarly views concerning the problem of the ending of the Gospel of Mark, from the ante-Nicene Fathers to the present day. Realizing the peripheral issues related to the ending of Mark, care was taken not to overextend the boundaries of this study. The question that guided this book was whether ephobounto gar is a legitimate ending of a work.

History of the Interpretation of the Gospel of Mark. Volume One
2008 0-7734-5190-0
This two-volume work examines the entire history of the interpretation of the Gospel of Mark. In this first volume, the author presents the history of the Gospel’s interpretation from the time of its composition through the nineteenth century. The second volume covers history of interpretation during the twentieth century.

History of the Interpretation of the Gospel of Mark. Volume Two, Book One and Two
2008 0-7734-5117-X
This two-volume work examines the entire history of the interpretation of the Gospel of Mark. In this second volume, the author presents the history of the Gospel’s interpretation during the twentieth century. The first volume covers the history of interpretation through the nineteenth century.

History of the Two Hundred Year Scholarly Debate about the purpose of the Prologue to the Gospel of John. How does our understanding of the Prologue affect our interpretation of the subsequent text?
2015 1-4955-0356-9
A new summary of the most-oft asked questions about the Prologue to the Gospel of John that have been posed by some of the most influential Biblical Scholars over the past 200 years and the problematic nature of its interpretation.

How are we healed by Christ? An explanation of John 9:1-41
2014 0-7734-0073-7
The literary paradigm approach to this study on “healing” examines three key features in Chapter 9 in the Book of John. It provides a literary criticism on the text from an ahistorical view, it examines the autonomy of the text, and points us toward its aesthetic meaning. This approach helps the reader to understand "healing” from the perspective of the individual’s physical healing as well as his psychosocial and spiritual healing experience.

How the Easter Story Grew From Gospel to Gospel
1989 0-88946-003-5
Deals with the Easter occurrences: the reporters; the various ways of accounting for Jesus' Easter appearances, including theories that the disciples stole the body or that coma was followed by physical revival; proliferations of stories about Jesus' post-Easter ministries in parts of the world; and the development of Mary stories in connection with the Passion and Easter.

Hymn Fragments in the New Testament. Hellenistic Jewish and Greco- Roman Parallels
2008 0-7734-4923-X
This study investigates the three main images of Christ in the material normally designated as hymnic in the New Testament (Phil 2:6-11, 1 Cor 8:6, Col 1:15-20, John 1:1-18, Heb 1:3-4, 1 Tim 3:16), specifically the images of Christ the pre-existent divinity, Christ the Creator and Christ the Incarnate god. It is the position of the author that the closest literary antecedents for the first two images can be found in the literary world of Hellenistic Jewish wisdom speculation, specifically that subset of Hellenistic Jewish wisdom speculation influenced by Middle Platonic thought and exemplified by the works of Philo of Alexandria. The final image, that of Christ the Incarnate god, finds its’ most compelling literary antecedents in works of Greco-Roman religious thought and philosophy, specifically those myths which deal with gods taking human form and serving as slaves. The image of the god as flesh, a subset of those images which deal with Christ as an incarnate god, however, fails to be easily classified as deriving from either Hellenistic Jewish or Greco-Roman literary images.

Import of Eschatology in John Howard Yoder's Critique of Constantinianism
1992 0-7734-9808-7
Through a close reading of relevant primary and secondary literature, this study describes and evaluates Yoder's eschatologically informed critique of Constantinianism and his alternative theory of Christian social action. The study finds that the relationship between Yoder's eschatology and his view of Christian social ethics is characterized by a lack of conceptual coherence at numerous points. The conclusions are largely critical of Yoder's project, as neither his critique of Constantinianism, nor his proposed alternative, is displayed with exacting historical accuracy and conceptual precision.

Integrating Theology and Ethics in Ephesians. The Ethos of Communication
2000 0-7734-7741-1
This study examines the Letter to the Ephesians with the primary goal of indicating how the two distinct and diverse parts of the text (chapters 1-3 and chapters 4-6) are related. It proposes that the moral exhortation or paraenesis of Ephesians 4-6 is not directly or argumentatively derived from the theological narrative of Ephesians 1-3, but that the document persuades its Christian audience to accept exhortations and to behave in appropriate ways by reminding them of certain theological realities and encouraging identification with them. Methodologically, this book takes into account the oral/aural nature of early Christian texts and employs a rhetorical critical analysis of Ephesians as a way of observing the dynamics at work. As a whole, the work offers an explanation of how the halves of Ephesians are integrated with each other along with a full description of the rhetorical nature and characteristics of the letter.

Interpretation of the Gospel of Luke in the 20th Century
2005 0-7734-6106-X
This is the first detailed overview of Luke’s Gospel from the beginning up to the present day. It is a careful , lively presentation which situates Lukan scholarship within the main trends of biblical interpretation. It is based on the conviction that such an overview is particularly valuable in our time of such a variety of approaches and, in particular, that much can easily be lost of the valuable heritage of Lukan scholarship. While each generation can build upon the last, new interpretations are only solidly possible when we build on the shoulders of those who have gone before us.

Interpretation of the Gospel of Luke. From Apostolic Times Through the 19th Century
2005 0-7734-6104-3
This is the first detailed overview of Luke’s Gospel from the beginning up to the present day. It is a careful , lively presentation which situates Lukan scholarship within the main trends of biblical interpretation. It is based on the conviction that such an overview is particularly valuable in our time of such a variety of approaches and, in particular, that much can easily be lost of the valuable heritage of Lukan scholarship. While each generation can build upon the last, new interpretations are only solidly possible when we build on the shoulders of those who have gone before us.

Interpreting Luke-Acts for the local Church. Luke Speaks for Himself
1994 0-7734-2388-5
This scholarly attempt to let Luke himself unfold the why, how, and what of his two-part work communicates an understanding of Luke-Acts in language that can make the material alive for those who are not professional academics. The approach to the material is new, and there are fresh interpretive insights, helping readers understand what made Luke tick in his time and how he understood (among other themes) the Hebrew Scriptures, history, the Holy Spirit, Jesus, and the church.

Introduction to Intertextuality
1995 0-7734-2387-7
This book contains a few examples of the way midrash is discovered and recognized in the Hebrew Scripture and in the New Testament. The examples given illustrate the significance of insights gained from this kind of study and the philosophy that prompted ancient prophets, Psalmists, wisdom writers, and authors of New Testament gospels, letters, essays, and sermons to compose literature in the way they did.

Investigation of Koimaomai in the New Testament. The Concept of Eschatological Sleep
1996 0-7734-2417-2
This work argues that the sleep-of-death metaphor in New Testament usage is compatible with an approach to a model of the intermediate state called wholistic dualism. Focusing mainly on the New Testament witness, this book investigates the historical progression of the use of the term koimaomai and its minor semantic associates from the time of Homer to the early church fathers. The time frame includes a consideration of non-Christian Greek and Latin sources; the Hellenistic period including the LXX, Pseudepigrapha, Philo, Josephus; the semantic domain in Hebrew and Aramaic incorporating the Old Testament and the literature of Second Temple Judaism; and the early post-biblical reaction. An exhaustive search of the TLG uncovered many striking examples from primary sources.

Irony and the Kingdom in Mark. A Literary & Critical Study
1997 0-7734-2435-0
This treatment of irony and Kingdom theology in the Gospel of Mark contributes to the enrichment of Markan scholarship in four ways. First, the work is a fairly comprehensive treatment of the use of ironic technique in Mark, focusing on the Kingdom. Second, the study shows how Mark constructs his ironies and clues the reader to their presence. Third, the study classifies every irony identified in the text, and finally, the study shows that Mark takes ironical episodes and weaves them together to produce larger themes which are themselves ironical.

Jesus' Last Passover Meal
1993 0-7734-2370-2
The goal of this work is a historical reconstruction of the Last Supper, of not only the who, what, where, and when, but also the why. It begins with a detailed account of how a typical first-century Passover would have proceeded, and then moves into a literary-critical analysis of the relevant New Testament texts.

Jesus, Born of a Slave. The Social and Economic Origins of Jesus' Message
1998 0-7734-2440-7
This book is an exploration of Jesus' social origins and location in the society of his time and place. The hypothesis proposed is that Jesus was of slave status because he was born of a woman who was a slave. Contends that his career outside his household of origin was as a "freedman" with continuing obligations to his former owner. This hypothesis explains much that is otherwise obscure in the early Christian writings concerning Jesus, and facilitates reconstruction of his life and crucifixion. The book applies adaptations of methodologies used by the Jesus Seminars of the Westar Institute, of which the writer was a Fellow, to determine the historicity of teaching ascribed to Jesus. Table of Contents: Introduction; Jesus as a Slave - Historical Plausibility; In the Form of a Slave; Slave or Son? John's Gospel; Slave Experience in Jesus' Teaching; From Slave to Slave/Child of God - the Synoptic Gospels and the Acts; An Outlaw Slave and the Jewish Law - the Synoptic Gospels; A Fugitive Slave and His Community in the Synoptic Gospels; Condemnation and Death of an Upstart Slave; Family and Birth Traditions; Conclusions and Reflections; Bibliography and Index

John's Gospel and the History of Biblical Interpretation
2002 0-7734-6980-X
Like the author's previous studies on Mark's Gospel (1982) and The History of Biblical Interpretation, this study of John's Gospel is much more than a mere list of annotated entries. The aim of these lively entries is to situate Johannean scholarship within the main trends of biblical scholarship from the first century up to the present while reaching out to the main corners of the Christian traditions. It avoids duplicating many items which are normally discussed in standard works. It is based on the firm belief that a solid knowledge of the whole Johannean tradition and its afterlife is vital for the adequate grasp of this key text. A valuable index of names is included.

John's Gospel and the History of Biblical Interpretation
2002 0-7734-6982-6
Like the author's previous studies on Mark's Gospel (1982) and The History of Biblical Interpretation, this study of John's Gospel is much more than a mere list of annotated entries. The aim of these lively entries is to situate Johannean scholarship within the main trends of biblical scholarship from the first century up to the present while reaching out to the main corners of the Christian traditions. It avoids duplicating many items which are normally discussed in standard works. It is based on the firm belief that a solid knowledge of the whole Johannean tradition and its afterlife is vital for the adequate grasp of this key text. A valuable index of names is included.

Jude - A Structural Commentary
1996 0-7734-2415-6
In addition to providing the necessary information regarding the background, historical setting, etc., this unique commentary makes a decision about the semantic 'chunks' that are to be interpreted. These chunks structure all discourse, and this structural way of organizing the text helps prevent clueless contextual interpretation. It also fleshes out the implied information which is critical to understanding Jude, and looks at the contential philosophy as it gives insight to the rhetorical environment.

Kommentiertes Lexikon Zum Vierten Evangelium. Seine Textkonstituenten in Ihren Syntagmen Und Wortfeldern
1993 0-7734-2386-9
This lexicon constitutes an indispensable linguistic handbook on the Fourth Gospel as a prerequisite for a regular commentary. It provides a comprehensive presentation of the style of this gospel. The text constituents are described first as syntasms within the Gospel of John and then in form of specific johannine work-fields. Its emphasis is on the semantic interpretation in its syntagmatic as well as paradigmatic relations. The lexical entries are alphabetically arranged. First statistical records are given, and then follows the semantic and syntactic commentary on each entry. The numerous cross-references within the Gospel of John are of special value to the interpreter who wants to understand the typical johannine language, its setting and thus its specific theology. In German

Lazarus and the Fourth Gospel Community
1995 0-7734-2428-8
This study offers several important contributions to Gospel studies. First, it casts light on the Fourth Gospel's Beloved Disciple, setting forth four essential questions: 1.) Is this disciple meant as a real person who followed Jesus during his ministry? 2.) If so, who was he? 3.) What does "disciple whom Jesus loved" mean? 4.) Why does the Gospel refer to him without using his name? The author makes a thorough case that Lazarus of Bethany was the Beloved Disciple. A more significant contribution follows; Lazarus is identified as Eleazar, son of Boethus, whose sisters Miriam and Martha appear briefly in rabbinic literature. This identification is based on evidence in the Fourth Gospel, in Josephus, in second-century Christian tradition, and in the Talmud and Midrash. The assumption that the Synoptics are more reliable than the Fourth Gospel is challenged. The study raises new questions about the political situation during Jesus' ministry, and the profound theology of the Fourth Gospel is explained in view of Eleazar's background as the High Priest.

Life and Ministry of Jesus as Enactment of the Great Commission: A New Proposal for Interpreting Matthew 28:16-20 in Light of Matthew’s Gospel
2015 1-4955-0333-X
This stimulating book fills a lacuna in New Testament studies on the interpretation of the missional paradigm of the “Great Commission” by energizing an interdisciplinary dialogue and fresh inquiry into the passage, it’s biblical theology, it’s missiological theory and it’s contemporary cultural perspective which are deeply rooted in Jesus’ mission and His vision for the coming kingdom of God.


Luke. A Critical Study
1993 0-7734-9326-3
Schleiermacher's Luke (1817) displays what he took to be an accurate portrayal of the Redeemer's self-proclamation within the early church. This brilliant exegetical work specializes in higher-critical techniques then emerging. In particular, his use of redaction criticism in effect serves to discover "Q" and is scarcely surpassed in Lukan studies today. This portrayal is also crucial for his epoch-making Christian Faith (1821-1822). Editor Terrence N. Tice offers emendations to the 1825 translation by Connop Thirwall and essays placing the original and translated editions in historical perspective. The considerable appartus includes an analytical index on Luke passages with references to sermons and the Life of Jesus lectures, hereby resurrecting an important work virtually inaccessible for over 130 years.

Major Events in Luke's Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. Passages that are Critical to the Meaning of Other Passages and / or Luke's Entire Work
2014 0-7734-4335-8
The purpose of this present study is to explore and interpret ten passages in Luke-Acts that in my years of study and teaching have emerged for me as more important than others in Luke’s work because their significance extends far beyond their present context to affect the meaning of many other passages.
A cogent, compelling, precise, scholarly, insightful and informative exegetes on the Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles drawing certain ‘moments’ or parts, that are of extraordinary significance to Luke-Acts as a whole; exploring the meaning of each of these elements beyond its context in the narrative to imbue with meaning other parts of Luke-Acts and often the whole.


Making of Mark
1996 0-7734-2393-1
This seminal work in New Testament scholarship is the culmination of forty years study by A. Q. Morton into authorship attribution. During this time his principal aim has been to establish objectively (i.e., by scientific means) exactly what is the nature of the canonical texts which form the basis of the New Testament - the four Gospels, the Epistles, and Revelations - and also to discover how they came into being. The Making of Mark addresses the historical question of its form - was it produced on a roll or a codex? The answer, suggests Morton, is found in numerical regularity that comprises the divisions within the book. Morton inquires regarding the role of the scribe in the ancient world. What influence did the Jewish-Roman War have upon the production of the book? Morton's hypothesis is that Mark was a book subject to the current means of book production and the circumstances of its time. This makes sense of what has often puzzled earlier commentators. Not only is Morton able to attribute the various sequences of sentences in the four quarters of the Mark codex, he is able to show how 'the medium is the message': that is, how the form of Mark, with its twenty different contributors (according to cusum) governs what is included and where it is inserted: such decisions depend on the form of the book.

Matthew's Gospel and the History of Biblical Interpretation Book One
1997 0-7734-2431-8
When Kealy's similar history of the interpretation of Mark's Gospel was published, it was described by Howard Clark Kee as 'an excellent comprehensive history and analysis of Marcan interpretation arranged chronologically.' This current, massive two-volume pioneering work sets all the major works on Matthew against the changing and developing background of Biblical interpretation over nearly two thousand years, from the writers of the patristic era right up through the twentieth century, form and redaction criticism, and the latest approaches.

Matthew's Gospel and the History of Biblical Interpretation Book Two
1997 0-7734-2433-4
When Kealy's similar history of the interpretation of Mark's Gospel was published, it was described by Howard Clark Kee as 'an excellent comprehensive history and analysis of Marcan interpretation arranged chronologically.' This current, massive two-volume pioneering work sets all the major works on Matthew against the changing and developing background of Biblical interpretation over nearly two thousand years, from the writers of the patristic era right up through the twentieth century, form and redaction criticism, and the latest approaches.

Mimesis and Apostolic Parousia in 1 Corinthians 4 and 5. An Apologetic Mimetic Interpretation
2010 0-7734-3719-3
The study explores the verbal, thematic, and structural connectedness of 1 Corinthians 4 and 5 and proposes an apologetic and mimetic reading of the self-referential statements in chapter 5 against the backdrop of the imitation call in chapter 4. This work is a helpful guide to the what (content) and how (rhetoric) of Paul’s calls to imitation and exemplary self-referential statements in 1 Corinthians and resource on his self-understanding of his own authority.

Miracle Stories in the Acts of the Apostles
2001 0-7734-7585-0
This study first examines how Luke adapted the miracles from the Gospel of Mark and identifies consistent patterns in the way he used his source materials; it then applies these criteria to the stories and summaries in Acts, and uncovers the basic outlines of eleven pre-Lukan miracle traditions and few legend fragments. It examines how the author of Luke-Acts used these stories, how they fit in the literary design of Acts, what the relationship is of miracle to faith and conversion. The miracles stories throw into sharp relief Luke’s own understanding of Christ, the human condition, and the sovereignty of God.

Mystery of the Acts of John an Examination and Interpretation of the Hymn and the Dance in Chapters 94 and 96 in Light of the Acts' Theology
1992 0-7734-9956-3
According to the apocryphal Acts of John, Jesus introduced to his disciples a mystery rite that included a hymn and a dance. This study examines the relationship behind this secret sacrament, the Johannine Acts, and Christian Gnosticism. Discusses the sacrament's structure and interprets this mystery according to the theology of the Acts of John.

Mystery of the Book of Revelation. Re-envisioning the End of Time
2008 0-7734-5183-8
This work represents an intersection between two important methods of interpretation. It presents a very complex theory of narrative relating to the experience of time and the production and reception of narrative is applied to the question of the eschatology of the Book of Revelation. The work argues that John of Patmos has a vision of two ages: one of a world fraught with conflict, violence and oppression and another similarly present for the Christian faithful, in which they experience the salvation expected at the end of the ages, now, gathered under God’s protection.

Narrative Irony in Luke - Acts. The Paradoxical Interaction of Prophetic Fulfillment and Jewish Rejection
1996 0-7734-2359-1
The study shows, through narrative critical methodology, that the author of Luke-Acts sees irony in the events of the church's history, and that this irony is central to his primary theological purpose. The interaction of two prominent Lukan literary motifs, the fulfillment of scriptural prophecy and the Jewish rejection of Jesus and the gospel, produces a paradoxical irony of events that extends through the narrative and serves the author's christological and soteriological purposes. Christologically, the Jewish rejection of Jesus as Messiah demonstrates his messiahship, for it leads to his suffering and resurrection which fulfill the scriptural promises regarding the messianic event. Soteriologically, the Jewish rejection of the gospel actually promotes its worldwide acceptance, thereby fulfilling God's plan to grant salvation to all nations.

Narrative Structure and Message in Mark: A Rhetorical Analysis
2003 0-7734-6683-5
Students of the gospel of Mark have been convinced for some time that it is carefully structured so as to communicate the message its author intended, and a number of proposals have been advanced as to the nature of this structure. This book examines the major rhetorical strategies employed in the narrative in the hope of developing a suggestion that will gain wide acceptance and shed additional light on the message of this gospel. This study focuses on three rhetorical devices: chiasmus, orality, and midrash

New Testament Chronology
1992 0-7734-9920-2
The lack of correct understanding of the evolution of the Jewish calendar has been a stumbling block to biblical research. New Testament Chronology includes subjects of particular importance to both Christian and Jewish scholarship. Begins with the present western calendar and steps back to the opening of Genesis. The calendar system is then followed forward to the Bar Kokhba revolt in the second century CE and the later establishment of the modern Jewish calendar. Detailed studies are presented on Herodian chronology and Pontius Pilate. The dating of Acts completes the work.

New Testament Greek an Introductory Grammar
1989 0-88946-200-3
Created by a professor of Greek who wanted a textbook that suited his needs. Includes an excellent workbook and an instructor's manual that features exercises to augment those in the text and workbook, photocopiable examinations, and keys (instructor's manual available only to professors adopting the text). Write for your free examination copy of the textbook and workbook.

New Testament textural variations between the King James Bible and its Basis- the Bishops’ Bible (1568-1602) of the English Bible
2015 1-4955-0433-6
First published in 1568, the Bishops’ Bible was issued in its last edition in 1602. The first of the fifteen rules given for the guidance of the King James translators stated that the Bishops’ Bible was to be followed “and as little altered as the truth of the original will permit.” Rule fourteen further specified certain English translations to be used when they agreed “better with the text than the Bishops’ Bible.” The Authorized Version was both a revision of the earlier English Bibles and a translation from the original languages, all based on the Bishops’ Bible.

The immediate concern of this work, then is why the Bishops’ Bible, and the extent to which the King James Bible is indebted to it. And second arily, the degree to which the King James Bibles relies on the earlier English translations, other possible sources that might have influenced the translators, and evidence of the translators at work as they transformed the Bishops’ Bible into the Authorized Version. The book includes a detailed history of the Bishops’ Bible and its edition as well as a complete collation of the New Testament of the 1602 Bishops’ Bible with the 1611 Authorized Version.


New Testament- An Idiomatic Translation
2006 0-7734-6103-5
This translation attempts several things: first, it tries to be faithful both to the Greek and the English languages, giving ordinary English for ordinary Greek words, avoiding “Biblical” jargon. Second, the English reflects the individual style and personality of Greek writers. Third, the documents appear in the order they were actually written, enabling the reader to follow the earliest development of Christian thought. Fourth, the little introductions reveal the psychological context of the documents, showing the motivation behind them. Finally, the introductions show how the documents reveal whether their religious dimension was attached to or grew out of the actual facts that happened historically.

The first volume, “Early Letters” consists of the letters of Paul, James, Peter, Jude and Hebrews, arranged in the following order: First and Second Thessalonians, Galatians, First Corinthians, James, the second half of Second Corinthians, the first half of Second Corinthians, Romans, Hebrews, Philippians, Philemon, “Ephesians,” Colossians, First Timothy, First Peter, Titus, Second Timothy, Jude, Second Peter. The reason for the documents’ placement is explained in the introductions to each one.

In the second volume, “The Master’s Life,” the documents’ order is Mark’s report of the Good News, Luke’s Report, Matthew’s Report, and the Acts of the Emissaries. Again, the reason for the order is explained in the introduction to the volume and the introductions to the individual Reports.

The third volume, “Further Revelation,” comprises the words of John, in the following order: The second letter of John, the third letter of John, the first letter of John, John’s Report of the Good News, and Revelation. Since Revelation does not speak for itself, a commentary is supplied, giving the passages from the Old Testament that are quoted and the number-symbolism that is used, including the number of times the nouns are repeated, forming a key to the meaning of the various numbers.

New Testament. An Idiomatic Translation
2006 0-7734-6061-6
This translation attempts several things: first, it tries to be faithful both to the Greek and the English languages, giving ordinary English for ordinary Greek words, avoiding “Biblical” jargon. Second, the English reflects the individual style and personality of Greek writers. Third, the documents appear in the order they were actually written, enabling the reader to follow the earliest development of Christian thought. Fourth, the little introductions reveal the psychological context of the documents, showing the motivation behind them. Finally, the introductions show how the documents reveal whether their religious dimension was attached to or grew out of the actual facts that happened historically.

New Testament. An Idiomatic Translation
2006 0-7734-6021-7
This translation attempts several things: first, it tries to be faithful both to the Greek and the English languages, giving ordinary English for ordinary Greek words, avoiding “Biblical” jargon. Second, the English reflects the individual style and personality of Greek writers. Third, the documents appear in the order they were actually written, enabling the reader to follow the earliest development of Christian thought. Fourth, the little introductions reveal the psychological context of the documents, showing the motivation behind them. Finally, the introductions show how the documents reveal whether their religious dimension was attached to or grew out of the actual facts that happened historically.



Origin and Development of the Christian Liturgy According to Cultural Epochs. Vol. 1
2006 0-7734-5756-9
These books on the origin and development of the Christian liturgy are the result of the author’s teaching the subject to university students. It is not an original work, but rather a collection, compendium and thesaurus of historical, and especially liturgical, data through the centuries, with names, dates, and an ample bibliography. This publication is a significant contribution to the liturgical literature, since no book of the history of liturgy exists in the English language.

The history of the liturgy is divided according to cultural epochs. If liturgy is the communal manifestation of religious encounter between God and his people, then this manifestation would be influenced in each age according to certain cultural patterns. The books do not provide the liturgical data in isolation, but considers them within their political, cultural and church-historical context.

The main purpose of the work is to give some tools to readers today for distinguishing the essential, permanent elements of liturgy and its historically conditioned manifestations. At the same time, besides the scientific apparatus of specialized bibliography, the reader will enjoy the political, cultural and ecclesial overview of each epoch before becoming familiar with the changes in the liturgy itself.

Origin and Development of the Christian Liturgy According to Cultural Epochs. Vol. 2
2006 0-7734-5705-4
These books on the origin and development of the Christian liturgy are the result of the author’s teaching the subject to university students. It is not an original work, but rather a collection, compendium and thesaurus of historical, and especially liturgical, data through the centuries, with names, dates, and an ample bibliography. This publication is a significant contribution to the liturgical literature, since no book of the history of liturgy exists in the English language.

The history of the liturgy is divided according to cultural epochs. If liturgy is the communal manifestation of religious encounter between God and his people, then this manifestation would be influenced in each age according to certain cultural patterns. The books do not provide the liturgical data in isolation, but considers them within their political, cultural and church-historical context.

The main purpose of the work is to give some tools to readers today for distinguishing the essential, permanent elements of liturgy and its historically conditioned manifestations. At the same time, besides the scientific apparatus of specialized bibliography, the reader will enjoy the political, cultural and ecclesial overview of each epoch before becoming familiar with the changes in the liturgy itself.

Parable of the Woman in Childbirth of John 16:21: A Metaphor for the Death and Glorification of Jesus
2011 0-7734-1500-9
She has provided feminist theology and Johannine studies with new challenges and new creative insights and understandings with which future scholars, activists and mystics will need to engage if we are to allow the moon to come into view and not just the finger that points to it as we read and engage with this study.

Parables and Fables as Distinctive Jewish Literary Genres
2012 0-7734-2598-5
A book that concerns itself with the historical development of the fable or parable as a way of communicating knowledge and truth, in both Judaism and Christianity.

Patterns of Redemption in the Fourth Gospel. An Experiment in Structural Analysis
1998 0-7734-8396-9
The analysis of the textual structuring of the Fourth Gospel leads directly to the issue of its exegetical import. It is part of the theory and practice of concentric compositions that the structures exist in order to underline basic thematic concerns: the choice of form sets up a system of points of emphasis and points that are linked through some kind of correspondence. Thematic analysis shows that 21 large concentric compositions, arranged symmetrically, are organized in a prologue and seven parts, around two main themes of Jesus as the New Temple and Jesus as the Light and Life of the World.

Paul's Defense of His Ministerial Style. A Study of His Second Letter to the Corinthians
2011 0-7734-1557-2
This study of 2 Corinthians indicates that Paul maintained that Christian life and ministry generally, and apostolic ministry in particular, must be carried out through divine power, not human power.

Perfection in New Testament Theology. Ethics and Eschatology in Relational Dynamic
1996 0-7734-2355-9
This volume first presents comparative research in one conceptual domain of ancient Jewish/Christian thought, and secondly, points out that modern critical theology, past and present, has misunderstood ancient Jewish and Christian perfectionism. Examines three unrelated samples of perfectionistic espousal from Second Temple Judaism in a Palestinian setting contemporaneous with the rise of Christianity. The relationship between ethics and eschatology reveals certain basic commonalities and specific individual divergences. Three unrelated samples of perfectionistic espousal are also taken from the New Testament, sharing some of the same basic commonalities with the Jewish writings. They also share some basic commonalities in contradistinction to them. The real basis for Jewish perfectionism was covenantal relationship, involving conforming behavior expressive of elect relationship. The basis for New Testament perfectionism is relationship to Christ within the gracious provision of the New Covenant. Perfection is a relational dynamic, one that can coexist with and increasingly conquer sin. It is human destiny as relationship with God, presently opened to all who identify with the new work of God accomplished by Jesus.

Perspectives on John. Method and Interpretation in the Fourth Gospel
1993 0-7734-2856-9
These essays represent a broad theological spectrum, and employ diverse methodologies. Articles deal with introductory issues (especially regarding questions of authorship, sources, and historical reliability), topics related to the worship and liturgy of the Johannine community, and employ literary and redactional methods to explore specific passages or themes in John.

Portrayal of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew
2012 0-7734-1406-1
This is the first monograph on Matthew’s presentation of Jesus as “Shepherd.” Seven passages are selected and critically analysed. (Matt 2,1-12; 9,35-38; 15,21-28; 18,10-14; 25,31-46; 26,30-35; 28,16-20)

Problems of New Testament Gospel Origins a Glasnost Approach
1992 0-7734-9807-9
This study takes a fresh approach to the Gospel origins problem, in which embarrassing implications of certain patristic evidence, as well as of the internal Gospel evidence, is paid special attention. All traces of theological commitment are set aside, while noting where previous analyses went astray in failing to do so. The main findings are that Papias' Logia was the key source document, and that a modified form of the traditional Augustinian hypothesis as well explains the priorities among the synoptic gospels. Limited sections of Mark also receive priority, however, through a novel stolen-writing hypothesis that explains the motivation for the writing of Mark and why it suddenly follows Matthew's order so well after Matthew's 12th chapter and so poorly before that point.

Rabbinic Perspectives on the New Testament
1991 0-88946-689-0
Disposes of the incorrect view expressed by many Jewish apologists that there is no explicit Jewish doctrine of the afterlife; that Judaism is concerned with earthly existence only; and "warns us against useless speculation about the details of the afterlife." Explicates an elaborate doctrine of eternal punishment which is explicitly formulated and recorded in the Talmud and various Midrashim.

Raising of Lazarus and the Passion of Jesus in John 11 and 12
2003 0-7734-6694-0
This study holds that the fourth evangelist adopted and combined various traditions in chapters 11 and 12 into a single, unified eschatological statement, separately and specially conceived, as a complex literary and theological hinge of John’s Gospel, a bridge between Christ’s ministry to the world and his ministry to his disciples. The extent and unity of this statement has been disguised by the tendency to apply to John a pericopean mentality suitable for the Synoptics but foreign to John. When John 11 and 12 are viewed as a single, eschatological statement, an analysis of its three dominant literary forms (plot structure, sign and dialogue structure, and narrative dramatic structure) can help establish that the passage of 10:40-12:50 constitutes a tightly-knit literary unity. John shapes Jesus’ final discourse, 12:44-50 primarily as the natural conclusion of his eschatological statement, and secondarily as a summary of chapters 1-12 because the insertion of 11 and 12 is itself designed as the climax and summary of chapters 1-12. This new interpretation gives the passage a tight and comprehensive fit with the whole of John’s Gospel.

Resurrection Narrative in Matthew: A Literary-Critical Examination
1993 0-7734-2384-2
This work concentrates on the story that the narrative tells and highlights certain themes within the narrative from the perspective of literary criticism. Particular attention is given to the themes that unify the narrative, plot development, and Matthew's characters and their points of view. Concludes by highlighting three themes: the element of conflict between Jesus and his disciples and the religious leaders; prophecy and fulfillment; and universal mission to the nations.

Rethinking 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 through Archaeological and Moral-Rhetorical Analysis
1997 0-7734-8562-7
". . . a genuine contribution to research. The cultural practice which Paul recommends here has bedeviled interpreters for years, and thus further investigation is warranted, especially since we now have the capability to search Greek literature in a comprehensive way through computer analysis. Blattenberger argues that the custom in view is not veiling nor does Paul demand the wearing of a shawl when women pray or prophesy. The cultural practice in view relates, says Blattenberger, to the way a woman wears her hair . . . . Blattenberger has made a good case for his proposal, and his evidence must be seriously considered by scholars in identifying the practice commanded in 1 Cor. 11:2-16." - Thomas R. Schreiner ". . . provides a discussion of important issues that many will find significant for their own work in this area." - E. Earle Ellis

Role of the Rule of Faith in the Formation of the New Testament Canon According to Eusebius of Caesarea
2014 0-7734-4254-5
The book evaluates the canonization process from a new angle in that, according to Eusebius of Caesarea, the Rule of Faith served as a criterion of canonicity, encompassing both the subcriteria of apostolicity and catholicity.

Significance of Theophilus as Luke’s Reader
2004 0-7734-6384-4
Few studies of Luke’s Gospel (or Acts) give much attention to Theophilus and his potential significance despite the fact that Luke indicates specifically that he is writing ‘for Theophilus’. Those which do not recognize the importance of Theophilus nevertheless dismiss him because almost nothing is known about the individual.

Socio-Rhetorical Interpretation of the Seven Trumpets of Revelation
2012 0-7734-2567-5
An innovative biblical study that focuses on the idea of social and ideological “markers” when interpreting the text surrounding the seven trumpets found in the Book of Revelation. It is the first study to give a detailed explanation of these trumpets and what they symbolize in Revelation.

Sociology of Johannine Christianity
1996 0-7734-8753-0
This study uncovers the first-century community dynamics that occurred among the people to whom the Gospel of John is addressed. It first separates early from late passages, then portrays the local social situation around each layer of literary tradition. Following the successive portrayals, the study finds a change from the 'forum' social situation to a 'jurisdictional dispute', and then to a schism between Christians and non-Christians within a local synagogue. Following the schism came the formation of separate Jewish and Christian identities, a high christology among the Christians, and a conformance on the part of part of the Johannines to the practices of other Christian groups. Special discussions focus on Johannine conceptions of ultimacy, the desyncretizing activity among the Johannine Christians, and their similitude of modernity.

Structure and History in John 11. A Methodological Study Comparing Structuralist and Historical Critical Approaches
1991 0-7734-9942-3
Examines two methods of interpreting scriptural text, the historical critical method and the French structuralist method. The former looks beyond the text to explore issues of reference and authorial intentionality, while the latter focuses on the inner world of the text. Bridges juxtaposes an historical critical exegesis and a structuralist analysis of the story of the raising of Lazarus, successfully showing the strengths and weaknesses of both methods.

Study of Romans 6:5
1993 0-7734-9946-6
Presents a thorough history and interpretation, contributes a careful analysis of this enigmatic verse, speculating on a "union" between the believer and his/her own death to sin. Also engages in creative reflection upon the origins of the Pauline language in the verse.

Synoptic Gospels Compared
2003 0-7734-6814-5
For over two centuries of controversy has raged over priority of writing among Matthew, Mark, and Luke (the Synoptic Problem), with no solution to date that does not bristle with difficulties. But there is one approach that has not been considered: that Mark wrote the first Gospel, Luke revised and expanded it into his version, and Matthew re-edited Marks Gospel, also using and editing Luke along with it.

Syntax Criticism of Johannine Literature, the Catholic Epistles, and the Gospel Passion Accounts
1990 0-88946-618-1


Syntax Criticism of the Synoptic Gospels
1987 0-88946-610-6
The sequel to Martin's pioneering Syntactical Evidence of Semitic Sources in Greek Documents (Cambridge, Society Bib. Lit., 1974). In this study Martin applies his previously developed set of criteria for evidence of a Greek translation of a Semitic original to the Synoptic gospels, using as his methodology a calculus of the frequency of unusual syntactical formation.

Theological Significance of Jesus’ Temple Action in Mark’s Gospel
2002 0-7734-7141-3


Transfiguration of Christ in Scripture and Tradition
1986 0-88946-609-2
A study, both biblical and patristic, that bridges the gap that has developed between dogmatics and biblical exegesis. Presents the basic texts on the transfiguration of Christ in Mark and their exegesis, then discusses the interpretation of this theme in the early Greek and Latin Church Fathers. Includes translations of the basic Latin and Greek texts dealing with the transfiguration.

Understanding the Gospel of John
1992 0-7734-9640-8
Makes significant contributions to the scholarly understanding of the Gospel in three areas: understanding the Beloved Disciple not as a historic person, but as any person in the bosom of Christ as Christ is in the bosom of God, and such persons are the source of church authority; studies the dialogues which Jesus has with the "spiritually dull" as a way by which Jesus shows his divinity; and sees John as a midrashic development of the Synoptic Gospels. Important to the general reader is the attention given to the literary form of the Gospel, its understanding of Jesus as divine, the discussion of key concepts -- such as light and darkness, and abiding in Christ -- and a discussion of the realized eschatology of the Gospel. The book will be useful as a text for college or church classes.

Use of Italian Renaissance Art in Victorian Religious Education: How the National Society Shaped Our Modern Idea of Christ
2011 0-7734-3641-3
This book provides an important insight into Victorian classroom pedagogy.

Use of Textual Criticism for the Interpretation of Patristic Texts. Seventeen Case Studies
2012 0-7734-3073-3
This book examines the textual emendations to patristic writings to showcase the theological preoccupations of early Christian teachings. The debate around the formation of a unified church produced several key texts in the history of Christianity, and they are discussed in these scholarly essays. These seventeen chapters examine a shift in textual interpretations, notice a change in literary genre, and also identify ancient editing techniques. Two essays actually show an intentional change in a text to make it palatable to a different audience.

Wisdom Christology in the Fourth Gospel
1992 0-7734-9947-4
This study traces the wisdom themes in the Johannine portrait of Jesus. After reconstructing the picture of Wisdom in pre-Christian Judaism, it investigates the wisdom themes in the gospel, explores the contributions which Wisdom Christology makes to contemporary Christology, giving particular attention to The Myth of God Incarnate debate and process Christology.

Writing in Greek But Thinking in Aramaic. A Study of Vestigial Verbal Communication in the Gospels
2012 0-7734-4062-3
In this monograph the author investigates the syntactic construction found in the Semitic languages known as verbal coordination as it relates to the translation and therefore the interpretation of the scriptures. In the course of his analysis, the author also discusses grammaticalization that has occurred to translate the function of the word from Hebrew to Greek. According to the author, translations of this construction account for certain awkward expressions in the Greek Gospel texts, particularly Mark and John, because the writers were thinking in Semitic and writing in Greek. There are significant implications for Bible scholars, translators and linguists.