Subject Area: Protestant: Anglican & Episcopalian

1892 Book of Common Prayer
1993 0-7734-9322-0
This study examines the 1892 revision historically, focusing on its reflection of the issues confronting the church in the late nineteenth century and on the process by which it was adopted. It attempts to uncover the place of the revision in the evolving self-understanding of the Episcopal Church. The 1892 revision represented a stunning departure from previous attitudes about the immutability of the prayer book, helped redefine the church's ethos at the start of a new century, and was the sine qua non for future revision. Little has been written on it since the turn of the century, and this is the only definitive work on this revision.

Achievement of the Anglican Church (1689-1800) the Confessional State in Eighteenth Century England
1995 0-7734-8990-8
This strongly revisionist account seeks to redress the harsh judgments on the Hanoverian Church by Victorian and later historians. This lucid work, drawing on much recent scholarship, advances an interpretation that is far more favorable. The Church's involvement in politics is explained and vindicated. An examination of the social status of the clergy, and of the professionalization of the ministry suggests that period was one of progress and advancement, and the discharge of episcopal and clerical duties is considerably more distinguished than hitherto conceded. Much of the evidence supports the Clark thesis that eighteenth century England was a 'confessional state', in which the ethos and aspirations of the Anglican Church predominated. Drawing on a wealth of primary and secondary sources, this book ably synthesizes both qualitative and quantitative evidence to encourage the view that for the Church the period was one of accomplishment rather than decline.

Anglican Church in 19th-Century Britain Hymns Ancient and Modern (1860-1875)
1989 0-88946-829-X
Discusses the theory and function of hymnody, Anglican hymnody, compilation, printing, and circulation, with an eye to proving that each hymn within a collection had its own purpose and its own intended use.

Canadian Anglicanism at the Dawn of a New Century
2001 0-7734-7571-0
This volume is composed of articles by Anglican scholars across Canada, and includes an essay by the Primate of Canada. It examines the current state of the Anglican church, and the challenges it faces, from culture wars to medical ethics and environmentalism.

Church Courts 1680 - 1840
2006 0-7734-5945-6
This book examines the development of the courts of the Church of England from 1680, William Sandcroft’s first year as Archbishop of Canterbury, to the Church Discipline Act of 1840. By illustrating the law and practice of the courts during this period, the author suggests that there was movement away from the traditional jurisprudence established by the canon law of the Church of England to regulation by Parliamentary legislation.

The author begins by looking at the ecclesiastical courts as they existed throughout much of the period. The procedures were regulated by the canon law, and the author examines these and the nature of the criminal proceedings that comprised the jurisdiction of these courts. He notes the origins and training of those who staffed these courts, the advocates and proctors, and finds them firmly rooted in the civil and canon law. The power of the church courts to censure and punish both the clergy and laity for spiritual offenses is explored in some detail. This leads inevitably to the particular issue of clerical discipline and the role of the bishop in trying to enforce canon law as it applied to his clergy. The legislative intervention of Parliament by Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act of 1753 to prevent clandestine marriages might have been seen to have been an encroachment into an area traditionally within the cognisance of the church courts and the canon law. Even more directly, the Clergy Discipline Act of 1840 now sought to determine how the bishop might discipline his clergy.

There is much here about the ecclesiastical and canon law of the Church of England itself in this period, the courts in which it was administered, criminal procedure and its technicalities, including the power to punish and discipline. Individual cases and contemporary correspondence, frequently drawn from archival sources, are extensively used to exemplify the changes that were taking place in the courts over this period.

Clergy of Winchester, England, 1615-1698: A Diocesan Ministry in Crisis
2011 0-7734-1580-7
This book attempts to assess the ministry of the Church in Winchester – a premier diocese – in the seventh century – a time of outstanding upheaval – as it underwent the awesome challenges of Archbishop Laud’s Arminianism, abolition during the wars and emergence after the Restorations into an age of Toleration.

The focus is the parish. While the hierarchy was immersed in national policy, the parish clergy were the front line – the interface – between Church and people. They performed the essential rites of passage in the communities, from baptisms to communion – and with the churchwardens, oversaw the fabric of their church, its fittings and charity. Five critical points – 1615, 1637, 1663, 1675, and 1697 – form the basis of this study. Early chapters examine such characteristics as ‘class,’ education, and income of the clergy; later chapters, likewise, parochial activity over the century.

It is the contention of this survey that the mid-century upheavals smashed traditional loyalties but that the parish clergy and their overlords, when restored, reverted to type and failed to heed the lessons of the 1640s/50s. Problems from outmoded parochial boundaries to pluralism and working into old age remained unaddressed, depriving the church of the vigorous ministry needed in the changed circumstances of post-restoration Britain.

Concordat of Agreement Between the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
2003 0-7734-6701-7
Although the Concordat of Agreement passed the 1999 Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Churchwide Assembly, there was still a solid bloc of Lutherans who refused to receive its theology. This study examines the decision-making process which led to the failure of the Concordat at the 1997 ELCA Churchwide Assembly for the deeper causes of the ongoing non-reception. Using insights from several theological disciplines (canon law, ecclesiology, ecumenism, and sacramental theology), as well as organizational behavior and management, it analyzes the verbatim transcripts of the 1997 assembly. The data gained from this research identifies and analyzes both the method of bilateral dialogue and the content of the theological propositions regarding historic episcopacy and three-fold ministry which form the causes of the non-reception of the Concordat. The findings identify a flaw in the method used in the ELCA bilateral dialogues – the lack of inter-governance to balance the intercommunion. This insight challenges other bilateral dialogues to examine their method as well. Also, by reviewing these findings from the standpoint of ecclesiology, it is able to generalize how the flaws could affect the communion at the global level.

Dissenting Thought and the Life of the Churches Studies in an English Tradition
1989 0-7734-9931-8
Reveals the diversity of English Dissenting thought. Some essays treat such themes of perennial importance to Dissenters as the nature of the Church and the relations between Church and state. Others show how, in the eighteenth century, doctrinal changes prompted by the Enlightenment influenced church life on the ground. The essays concerning the nineteenth century reveal the varied responses of prominent Dissenters to the shift of theological landmarks associated with the rise of modern biblical criticism and evolutionary thought. Finally, there are essays which demonstrate the continuing relevance of Dissenting thought to current ecumenical debate. Will be of interest to Dissenters, students of Christian thought, and ecumenists.

Ecclesiology of Archbishop William Temple (1881-1944)
2004 0-7734-6433-6
The thought of William Temple (1881-1944) (Archbishop of Canterbury 1942-1944) is highly esteemed and often referenced by the Anglican theologians who have come after him. However, because Temple’s work is often considered to be limited to his time and place, his writings have rarely been used as a foundation on which later theology can be constructed. The author disagrees with this judgment on the limits of Temple’s thought. This book explores a way in which Temple’s writings can be used to develop an understanding of the nature and tasks of the Church, primarily as that Church is situated in Western, industrialized, democratic nations.

The method of study is a “tradition-constituted” inquiry. This acknowledges the impact of specific written sources on Temple’s thought. However, it places greater emphasis on an attempt to understand the intellectual, spiritual, social and political influences to which he does not explicitly refer, but which have shaped his character and manner of thinking. Such influences would be both “high” and popular culture, participation in family and community life, and contact with a long spiritual tradition of preaching and worship.

There are few extended essays in which Temple’s ecclesiology is set forth, and this has led scholars such as Ronald Preston and Alan Suggate to conclude that Temple had no distinctive vision of the Church. However, a reading across the majority of Temple’s writings indicates that this view must be challenged. A careful reading of Temple’s works, treated synchronically, can produce a doctrine of the Church that is deeply engaged with the social and political life of a democratic nation. Such an ecclesiology points to the Church’s responsibility both to uphold and critique the nation, thereby enabling and encouraging it to grow in conformity with the biblical vision of the Kingdom of God.

Temple’s work provides a different ecclesiology from those offered by other modern Anglicans. This ecclesiology is at once more engaged than that proposed by John Milbank, and more humble and realistic than that envisioned by Oliver O’Donovan.

Gilbert Burnet's Discourse of the Pastoral Care
1997 0-7734-8537-6
Before his appointment in 1689 as Bishop of Salisbury, Gilbert Burnet had served as Professor of Divinity at Glasgow University, and during his exile in Holland he had served as a chaplain and advisor to William and Mary. Burnet accompanied William to England during the invasion that led to the change in monarchs. They rewarded Burnet with his episcopal see. His Discourse of the Pastoral Care, first published in 1692, with a new preface and chapter added to the third edition of 1713, was a pastoral care manual for ministers of the Church of England, and was in use throughout the 18th and well into the 19th century. Since the church had lost the power of coercive discipline, the treatise attempted to show pastors how to exert moral and spiritual discipline through the reliance on reason and moral persuasion. This critical edition provides an introduction to the life and thought of Gilbert Burnet, and provides an annotated text, giving biblical and bibliographical citations, as well as definitions of archaic terms.

Growth of " New London " in Suburban Middlesex (1918-1945) and the Response of the Church of England
2007 0-7734-5352-0
This groundbreaking book sheds much-needed light on the neglected ecclesiastical history of urban England in the twentieth century. Working from detailed field evidence Rex Walford has investigated the fate of the Church of England in suburban Middlesex (“New London” north of the Thames) between the two World Wars. Quite contrary to a widely-held view, the Anglican Church flourished and expanded in this area during this time. More Anglican Churches than cinemas were built in the Diocese of London between 1918 and 1945 and many of them were significant in architecture, liturgy and new strategies of mission. The story of the genesis of The Forty-Five Churches Fund, of T.S. Eliot’s involvement with the Fund and the spread of new churches is accompanied by five detailed case-studies as well as a wealth of evidence from parishes which were created in these new suburban areas in the 1920s and 1930s. The book is copiously illustrated with maps and photographs and provides a highly readable narrative of an exciting period of church development, as well as a penetrating analysis of the myth of “secularization”. There are 24 black and white photos in this book.

Lutheranism and Anglicanism in Colonial New Jersey an Early Ecumenical Experiment in New Sweden
1988 0-88946-673-4
The Lutheran Church of Sweden's ministry and mission began in the New World in 1636 with the short-lived colony of New Sweden and continued until 1789, or until about the time that the Swedish Lutheran churches of the Delaware Valley began joining the Episcopal Church (1784-1846). The story of the Swedish churches in colonial America constitutes a fascinating chapter in the history of ecumenical relations in America.

Non- Stipendiary Ministry in the Church of England a History of the Development of an Idea
1989 0-7734-9936-9
A scholarly study on how Paul interacted with his churches after he established them.

Professionalization of the English Church From 1560 to 1700 Ambassadors for Christ
1999 0-7734-7982-1


Religion and Society in Transition. The Church and Social Change in England, 1560-1850
1982 0-88946-804-4
A study of the interrelation between the history of the Christian Church in England and England's social history during the period of transition from medieval to modern society.

Richard Hooker’s Use of History in His “defense” of Public Worship: His Anglican Critique of Calvin, Barrow, and the Puritans
2011 0-7734-1591-2
This study examines how Hooker’s historical perspective developed in response to two theological opponents, Thomas Cartwright and Henry Barrow. Both the primitivism of Cartwright, the presbyterian puritan, and the apocalyptic primitivism of Barrow, the separatist, are contextualized and shown to be relevant to the overall argument presented in Hooker’s magnum opus, Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity.

Role of the Book of Common Prayer in the Formation of Modern Anglican Church Identity: A Study of English Parochial Worship, 1750-1850
2010 0-7734-1442-8
This research draws on a broad range of original sources, many neglected in existing studies, to offer a re-assessment of the role of the Book of Common Prayer in defining the identity of the Church of England and its worship from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. Contrary to conventional accounts, this book argues that the decades after 1750 were also a time of significant renewal and reform.

Selected Sermons for Christian Students on Campus
1993 0-7734-9247-X
This book is the first to contain 15 sermons chosen specifically for students. The list of contributers includes the former Archbishop of Canterbury, the Archbishop of York, the former Moderator of the Free Church, and the Bishops of Liverpool. It will appeal to young people, clergy, and to the general public.

Theology of John Macquarrie (1919-2007) A Comprehensive and Contextual Exploration
2010 0-7734-3611-1
Contribution to Scholarship: This is the only book on John Macquarrie to provide a comprehensive and contextual account of his theology This work also as situate Macquarrie broadly within the tradition of Anglican theology, and, to a more limited extent, Roman Catholic theology.

Turmoil in Hong Kong on the Eve of Communist Rule the Fate of the Territory and Its Anglican Church
1993 0-7734-2242-0
Probes the question of whether the current insights and actions of Anglicans adequately anticipate potential political realities as the Church moves from British to Chinese communist rule. The resulting analysis is supported by reflection on the Church's history in Hong Kong and its relationship to the British and Chinese communities. Scrutinizes the potential for freedom of religion in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China, in light of the Beijing-promulgated Basic Law, Hong Kong's future miniconstitution. Considers three political scenarios for China that might alter the Anglican agenda, and five scenarios for the Church in relation to China's possible attitudes toward religion. Recommends two strategies for pre-1997 Church action.