Subject Area: Nazism

American Intelligence’s Employment of Former Nazis During the Early Cold War: A Revisionist History
2009 0-7734-3878-5
This work examines the history and ramifications of the employment of former Nazi intelligence officers by the American intelligence community during that critical period of the Cold War, from the fall of Berlin through the end of the Eisenhower administration.

American Prisoners of War in German Death, Concentration, and Slave Labor Camps
2003 0-7734-6657-6
Using 16 personal interviews, government documents from Germany and the US, the author explores the experience of American POWs who were held in German concentration, death and slave labor camps. The work provides detailed accounts that document the presence of American POWs in these camps, and explores the reasons why the US government systematically suppressed information about them. It affirms that German policy was to kill as many prisoners as possible from all the allied nations, and systematically legalized its actions. It shows that the murder of POWs in death and concentration camps was not a matter of isolated incidents or random acts, but a planned policy. Other allied nations accepted the reports of their returning troops, but the US government denied the facts and covered them up.

Anglo-American Biomedical Antecedents of Nazi Crimes
2007 0-7734-5502-7
This study seeks to trace the development and implementation of the various Nazi crimes in Europe and to analyze these crimes in relation to certain antecedents prevalent in modern American and British history. By tracing the development and implementation of racism, romantic nationalism, and positive and negative eugenics in the history of these three nations, the author is able to demonstrate the lack of novelty in Nazi actions. Most chapters begin by considering British and American concepts relating to individual Nazi crimes before moving on to illustrate the particular developments in Germany that led to the grotesque reality of the Holocaust.

Berlin State Theater Under the Nazi Regime - A Study of the Administration, Key Productions, and Critical Responses From 1933-1944
2004 0-7734-6354-2
This study uses semiotic methodology to explain how artists and state appointed administrators at the Berliner Staatstheater created and implemented an aesthetic that fulfilled the political needs of the Nazi Party in Germany from 1933 through 1944. Three propaganda plays, two classic repertory plays, and a resistance play are analyzed to determine how stage designs, costumes, repertory, publicity, and acting choices translated or resisted Nazi cultural policy in production practice.

Analysis of the changes occurring in the Berliner Staatstheater during Hitler’s reign reveals specific production elements used by the Nazis to aesthetically translate their ideology for general, bourgeois distribution. Findings indicate that, while plays written as pure propaganda by avid party members like Hanns Jost dies quickly in repertory, avenues of propaganda remained open through carefully staged NSDAP productions of classic plays by playwrights such as Goethe and Schiller. Casting, character portrayals, thematic emphasis, design elements, and publicity for these productions displayed pointed references to Nazi cultural aims.

The study verifies that theater became a means by which a centralized power structure consciously manipulated public sentiment. Nevertheless, the study also provides a counter approach to the main argument by offering a brief look at the famous Staatstheater production of Shakespeare’s Richard III that attempted to resist and refute NSDAP policy. Conclusions regarding the destructive use of propaganda in current and future cultural endeavors close the report. An appendix includes a fully translated version Joseph Goebbel’s May 7, 1933 speech before German theater leaders. This speech represents a key statement of nazi cultural policy, which criticized the individualism of Weimar theater and proposes a united commitment to use theater as a means to promote “the virtue of community”.

Catholic Bishops of Europe and the Nazi Persecutions of Catholics and Jews
2012 0-7734-2932-8
The book describes the role way some Catholic Bishops attempted to resist the Nazi extermination of the Jews and other populations during the Holocaust. It shows that many Catholic Bishops throughout Europe risked life and limb sheltering Jews and other victims. While other scholars forward different opinions on the matter, Lapomarda’s analysis of Pope Pius XII uses factual evidence to show the Pope acted against the Nazis' treatment of the Jews, and facilitated massive movements against the final solution.

Childhood in the Third Reich World War II and Its Aftermath
2002 0-7734-3425-9


Church Confronts the Nazis Barmen Then and Now
1984 0-88946-762-5


Confessing Church, Conservative Elites, and the Nazi State
1986 0-88946-816-8
Examines the close relationship between aristocratic Prussian landowners and the leadership of the Confessing Church and shows the limits of German conservative-elite opposition to Nazism. Contends that the opposition of the Confessing Church to the Nazi regime was highly ambiguous and argues that the so-called church struggle was but a special case of class struggle.

Conservative Critique of Liberalism in the Weimar Republic Paving the Way to Nazism a Translation of Edgar Julius Jung's Die Herrschaft Der Minderwertigen/the Rule of Inferior People Volume One
1995 0-7734-9054-X
This translation of Jung's major political treatise (2nd edition, 1930) makes available for English readers the ideology of the neoconservative movement in the Weimar Republic. While the neoconservatives were not identical with the Nazis and even opposed them, the close similarities between the two should not be overlooked. As the purpose of this translation is to revive the work as a document of political science, rather than of history, only the first four parts of the work are presented, dealing with the intellectual foundations of statecraft, the society and state, culture, and economics, and five chapters of the last part dealing with the theoretical aspects of Jung's political views.

Conservative Critique of Liberalism in the Weimar Republic Paving the Way to Nazism a Translation of Edgar Julius Jung's Die Herrschaft Der Minderwertigen/the Rule of Inferior People Volume Two
1995 0-7734-9056-6
This translation of Jung's major political treatise (2nd edition, 1930) makes available for English readers the ideology of the neoconservative movement in the Weimar Republic. While the neoconservatives were not identical with the Nazis and even opposed them, the close similarities between the two should not be overlooked. As the purpose of this translation is to revive the work as a document of political science, rather than of history, only the first four parts of the work are presented, dealing with the intellectual foundations of statecraft, the society and state, culture, and economics, and five chapters of the last part dealing with the theoretical aspects of Jung's political views.

From Weimar Philosemite to Nazi Apologist the Case of Walter Bloem
1988 0-88946-349-2
The work describes one of Germany's best-known nationalists, Walter Bloem, his philosophical transformations, and his controversial contributions to German literature. His philosemitic novel Brotherhood represents a socio-political perspective in 20th-century Germany. His work is best understood in the semi-autobiographical light which Morris' book provides.

German Church Struggle
1990 0-7734-9995-4
A volume of basic studies by world-renowned specialists in nazism. Contributors include Eberhard Bethge, Wilhelm Niemöller, Henry Friedlander, Elie Wiesel, and Theodore Gill.

Hitler's Bavarian Antagonist
2006 0-7734-5735-6
This book examines an important but previously relatively unknown chapter in the Roman Catholic opposition to the rise of the Nazi Party between 1923 and 1933. In 1929, Dr. Georg Moenius (1890-1953), a Catholic priest from the Archdiocese of Bamberg, became editor of the highly-respected Munich weekly journal, the Allgemeine Rundschau, which had been published in Munich since 1904. The journal had been a relatively conservative Catholic journal noted for its support of the Catholic Centre Party and Bavarian Catholic culture. Under Moenius’ editorship, the Allgemeine Rundschau attained great notoriety in Central Europe for its fearless and bitter critique of the rise of the German right wing extremist groups, especially the ascendant National Socialist Party of Adolf Hitler, whom Moenius denounced as the ‘anti-Christ.’ Indeed, Moenius’ constant warnings of the peril of Nazism and Hitler were so shrill and persistent that he was accused (even by many who were otherwise sympathetic to him) of being afflicted by a ‘Moenomania.’

The Allegemeine Rundschau was banned in 1933, and Moenius fled Germany to escape arrest. The headstrong priest had to emigrate from one country to another as the Nazi Reich expanded between 1938 and 940, until finally he found refuge in the small colony of German emigrants in Los Angeles. Of those associates who remained in Germany after the Nazi seizure of power, many were banned from journalism. Others were placed in concentration camps.

This book is based on an extensive array of archival material from Germany, Austria and Switzerland and relevant primary sources from those countries. Given the important developments in German historiography in the twentieth century, which saw the breakdown of German statist tradition and that Germany is now of the most important members of the European Union, the significance and importance of the prescient critique of the Allgemeine Rundschau cannot be overstated.

Jesuits and the Third Reich
2005 0-7734-6265-1
Describes Nazi persecutions of the Jesuit order during the Third Reich and the fates of many Jesuits in Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, the Baltic States, Russia, Rumania, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Italy, the Low Countries, and France. Also focuses on Jesuit efforts in defense of human rights, particularly those of Jews, and provides a corrective to such views of the Roman Catholic Church of the Nazi period as that popularized by Rolf Hochhuth in The Deputy.

Jews in Leipzig, Germany Under Nazism, Communism, and Democracy
2011 0-7734-1514-9
A thorough examination of the enormous differences between the attitudes toward Jews of the First Republic, the Third Reich and the German Democratic Republic, or East Germany, the last regime of which has not been studied with the depth, due not least to the relatively recent opening of sources.

Nazi Appropriation of Shakespeare
2005 0-7734-6014-4
For the Nazis, Shakespeare was a major cultural icon, whose works belonged to German culture more than to English and were therefore to be exploited for political-propagandistic purposes like those of any other German “classical” writer. Following an overview of the importance of Shakespeare in German culture, this book’s three major sections investigate the controversy over the appropriate translation Shakespeare’s plays to be read and performed, the effect of the new political-cultural climate on Shakespeare-scholarship, and the attempts of the Nazis to “co-ordinate” Shakespeare’s works on the stage for propagandistic ends. This is the first complete study, entirely in English, to present the total picture of Shakespeare’s fortunes in Germany between 1933 and 1945 in the context of Nazi cultural policy.

Nazi Germany and Its Aftermath in Women Directors' Autobiographical Films of the Late 1970s in the Murderers' House
1992 0-7734-9851-6
An in-depth analysis of three pivotal works for students of German film history and post-war culture as it leads to the present political developments, the study puts films by West German film directors Helma Sanders-Brahms, Jutta Brückner, and Marianne Rosenbaum in the context of both German film politics/feminist film theory and the West German cultural, socio-political context of the last decade. Their films take an insistent close-up look at the average German family during the 1950s and how the fascist experience affected the interpersonal relationships and German children's upbringing in the post-fascist years, showing the deep-reaching transformations individual Germans and the family structure had undergone. The films' points of departure are distinctly new and intend to go beyond the known both in film and in patriarchal culture.

Nazi State and New Religions Five Case Studies in Nonconformity
1982 0-88946-865-6


Netherlands and Nazi Genocide Papers of the 21st Annual Scholars' Conference
1992 0-7734-9516-9
These papers highlight the contradictions in the Netherlands which led on one hand to a Dutch Nazi Party and a very low rate of survival among Dutch Jews, and on the other hand to facets of considerable resistance. Papers also discuss the symbolic message of Anne Frank. Others, written by those personally involved, pay the tributes of Dutch survivors and narrate the experience of Dutch rescuers. Others give fresh insight into such specialized topics as the experience of survivors in the DP camps after the war, the confrontation with Holocaust revisionists, the present day use of film and drama to convey the Holocaust, and the personal struggle with the Holocaust, e.g. the case of Gottfried Wagner.

Nobel Novelist Knut Hamsun During the Nazi Occupation of Norway: The Final Chapter that Was Omitted From Marie Hamsun’s Autobiography of Their Life Together
2011 0-7734-3944-7
This is Marie Hamsun's personal narrative from the years 1940-1952, i.e. from the invasion and occupation of Norway until the death of Knut Hamsun. She illuminates personal, psychological, and political facets of Knut Hamsun's character and traces the roots of his deep-seated Germanophilia and Anglophobia, respectively. Her insights are based on her forty-three-year marriage to the controversial Nobel Prize winning Norwegian writer and World War II Nazi collaborator. This edition is the first authorized English edition of Marie Hamsun's memoir, a work, which is indispensable to the understanding the life and works of Knut Hamsun.

Polish Intelligentsia in Nazi Concentration Camps and American Exile a Study of Values in Crisis Situations
1998 0-7734-8388-8
Based on interviews carried out in Chicago in 1955 with Polish intellectuals who survived wartime internment in Nazi concentration camps and later emigrated for political reasons to the US. Contributes to the study of life in the camps, emigration and assimilation studies, and theoretical studies of values. It begins with a brilliant exegesis of the social origins and occupations of the pre-war Polish intelligentsia, and of their aspirations and way of life analyzed under the headings of personalism, patriotism, spiritual leadership, liberal education, social refinement, and lifestyle. It emerges that pre-war intellectual values proved stronger in the camps (where her informants managed to maintain their roles as spiritual leaders) than in the seemingly lesser ordeal of exile. In Chicago, where they found only factory or low-level clerical jobs, had no access to higher intellectual and cultural milieux, and were distrusted or ignored by the Poles of an earlier emigration, the old values were often irrelevant.

Struggle for Life During the Nazi Occupation of Poland
1998 0-7734-8378-0
Testimony of the author's experience, hardships, suffering, and survival of the Nazi occupation of Poland. Includes photographs and reproductions of documents such as false birth certificate, 'true-passage' document, false travel document made by the underground, false train ticket made by the underground, example of anti-Semitic propaganda flier.

Theresienstadt Deception: The Concentration Camp the Nazis Created to Deceive the World
2012 0-7734-4059-3
The author describes the social structure, created by the prisoners themselves at Theresienstadt: the library, banks, schools, orchestra, medical facilities, and economic life. The book’s author provides eye witness information about the organization of this camp created by the Nazis in order to deceive the world about their true purpose.

Theresienstadt Deception: The Concentration Camp the Nazis Created to Deceive the World (softcover)
2013 0-7734-4061-5
The author describes the social structure, created by the prisoners themselves at Theresienstadt: the library, banks, schools, orchestra, medical facilities, and economic life. The book’s author provides eye witness information about the organization of this camp created by the Nazis in order to deceive the world about their true purpose.

Varieties of Protestantism in Nazi Germany. Five Theopolitical Positions
1990 0-88946-790-0
Examines the history of Christianity in the area of the relationship between theology and politics, particularly as applied to the encounter of German Protestantism and National Socialism, a topic usually treated as the German church struggle. Goes beyond the narrow and limited concerns of the church struggle by both historically deepening and methodologically broadening the perspective through a combined historical and systematic approach. Feige's five-pronged typology of Protestant responses to National Socialism opens up a comparative vantage point from which to address the strengths and weaknesses of the individual responses more fully. The five types are represented by the confessional position of Karl Barth, the neo-conservative Paul Althaus, the National Socialist Emanuel Hirsch, the liberal Martin Rade, and the religious socialist Paul Tillich. The typology is a heuristic device in the sense that equal attention is given to all five types.