Subject Area: Magazines, Weeklies, Journals, Newspapers

Academic Perceptions of Italian American Immigration as Seen in Scholarly Journals of the 1880s
2004 0-7734-6239-2
Book attempts to highlight anytime “Italian immigration” or “Italian immigrants” are mentioned in a scholarly periodical, including both passing notations and in-depth critical analyses of these topics. These references allow us to examine the initial and evolving perceptions of the academic community toward mass Italian American immigration from its basic beginnings in the early 1880s through the end of that decade. In addition, references about Italian immigration from the popular periodical press of the time are juxtaposed with the scholarly references to allow further insight into the erudite community’s perceptions as they are framed within the public opinion of the day.

American Moral and Sentimental Magazine ( New York 1797-1798). An Annotated Catalogue
2005 0-7734-6137-X
This New York semi-monthly periodical edited by Thomas Kirk appeared from July 1797 through May 1798 under a voluminous title that marks it as a hybrid serial-anthology/magazine: The American Moral & Sentimental Magazine, consisting of a Collection of Select Pieces, in Prose and Verse, from the Best Authors, on Religious, Moral, and Sentimental Subjects, calculated to Form the Understanding and Improve the Heart. Kirk was especially zealous to defend the “sacred and eternal obligations of Virtue and Religion” as that “affords a pleasure truly rational and refined.” Readers were invited to forward their own or any compositions to the editor, but from the outset, it was apparent that the editor would provide a “Collection of Select Pieces” and had material in hand that might or might not be supplemented by local contributions. In particular, as is documented in this annotated catalogue, Kirk provided a great deal on the “moral” and only a modest number of “sentimental” articles. As the annotations here demonstrate, just as travel narratives could serve the cause of religion, morality could be served by a judicious selection from the literature of sentiment, works wherein rough passions were modestly checked by refined emotions and a rational sensibility.

An Anatomy of Reprintings and Plagiarisms. Finding Keys to Editorial Practices and Magazine History, 1730-1820
2001 0-7734-7657-1
Gathers a variety of studies of British and American magazines in which the reprinted articles when traced to their origins reveal practices of editors that otherwise might go undetected. Some of these practices are false sales figures, false charges of plagiarism against those from whom the magazines most frequently plagiarized, the disguised reprinting of something old as something new, disclosure of scandal in the lives of persons invented to permit scandal to be disclosed, and promises of wonderful things to appear which never would or were intended to appear.

Best of Gentleman's Magazine, 1731-1754
1987 0-88946-457-X
An anthology of articles on politics, religion, science, exploration, marriage and family life, theater and the arts, medicine, and popular culture from the most influential periodical of the eighteenth century.

British Magazine January 1760-December 1767, Part 1. An Annotated Index of Signatures, Ascriptions, Subjects, and Titles of Literary Prose
2000 0-7734-7791-8
There is a heavy reliance on extracts from pamphlets and reprintings from contemporary magazines and newspapers.

British Magazine, 1746-1751, Part 2
2002 0-7734-6934-6
Whatever the strengths of the magazine through five volumes, the final volume of five numbers (January-May 1751) is conspicuously poorer in quality. There is a heavy reliance on extracts from pamphlets and reprintings (some veiled) from contemporary magazines and newspapers. Consequently, readers must have noticed the decline in quality and abandoned the magazine during the first half of the year. The final number for May was published late (about mid-June 1751), and then the British was silenced.

Charles Lamb as the London Magazine’s “Elia”
2003 0-7734-6592-8
Examines Charles Lamb’s satiric exuberance as an important component of Romantic emotional intensity. Lamb’s essays comment importantly – and in ways not previously recognized – on the poetry of such major romantics as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and Byron, several of whom he knew personally. Lamb’s original essays in the London Magazine differ from their collected form in the Essays of Elia and have never been reprinted. This volume contains the original London Magazine essays, with Lamb’s original spelling, with commentary following.

Comick Magazine or, Compleat Library of Mirth, Humour, Wit, Gaiety and Entertainment by the Greatest Wits of All Ages & Nations (London: Harrison & Co., March-December 1796)
2006 0-7734-5595-7
An annotated catalogue of The Comick Magazine (March-December 1796). Included in the catalogue is a Register of the Monthly Contents, a Title and Initial-Wording Index in Prose form, a Title and Initial-Wording Index in poetry form, an Index of Authors, Signatures, and Sources, as well as section of Works Cited and Consulted

Court, City, and Country Magazine, 1761-65
2002 0-7734-7055-7
The Court, City and Country Magazines was published from September 1761 to November 1765, but initially monthly numbers appeared under the title of Court Magazine, then in March 1763 they were changed to Court and City Magazines, and another change followed in February 1764 to The Court, City and Country Magazine, and this is the title to the end of the magazine's run, and the title used for the collected final volume.

Daily Life in Georgian England as Reported in the Gentleman’s Magazine
2002 0-7734-7351-3
This is a fully annotated scholarly anthology of selected excerpts from the Gentleman’s Magazine concerning topics of crime, medicine, science and natural history, archaeology, religion, parliamentary reporting, the American Colonies, the French Revolution, riots and radicalism, and literary criticism. Established in 1731 and generally considered the first major magazine in England, it constitutes an enormous and scarcely tapped source for scholarly investigation of Hanoverian culture and society. After a general introduction, nine chapters contain annotated excerpts from the first hundred years of publication, arranged topically, chosen to cover the widest possible range of aspects of Georgian life.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. An Annotated Initial Wording Index
2003 0-7734-6744-0
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 1. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
2003 0-7734-6747-5
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest. Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 2. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
2003 0-7734-6745-9
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Eighteenth-Century British Magazine Essayists. Vol. 3. An Annotated Initial Wording Index.
2003 0-7734-6749-1
This multi-volume series will help scholars and students of the period find their way quickly to the source of unacknowledged or incompetently ascribed reprintings of literary prose. The volumes will assist one in particular to trace reprintings in the periodicals and anthologies published outside of Great Britain. There are copious entries for passages other than the first line of a text, necessitated where a reprinting had edited out original first lines or significantly altered them; as plagiarism was customary, the many disguises of a text can only be captured by providing some of the first wording for key thematic statements. The Index is based on the following texts, supplemented by selective indexing of literary prose in those magazines for which abbreviations have been assigned below, with, in particular quite thorough indexing of the principal essay serials and several magazines of the 1745-85 periods, including The Museum, Rambler, Covent-Garden Journal, The Student, Inspector, Adventurer, Midwife, Craftsman, Gray’s-Inn Journal, Connoisseur, World, Prater, Old Maid, Universal Visiter, Idler, Centinel, and Beauties of the Magazines. Indexing for the Universal Magazine, London Magazine, and other long-run periodical is done with an emphasis on literary and moral essays with broad contemporary or modern interest.

Subscribers to the series will receive each volume for the subscription price of $59.95/£39.95. Individual volumes will be priced on page count.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 1
2002 0-7734-7107-3
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 2
2002 0-7734-7103-0
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

Fiction in American Magazines Before 1800. Vol. 3
2002 0-7734-7101-4
A three-volume set providing author and title indexing for fiction in about 75 eighteenth-century periodicals from the British colonies in America and later the USA.

How Arab Journalists Translate English-Language Newspaper Headlines: Case Studies in Cross-Cultural Understanding
2010 0-7734-3838-6
This work is a comparative descriptive analysis of seventy English language headlines and their Arabic translations gathered from the Arab national and international press and news agencies over the period of January 1, 2002 through August 1, 2002, a period that happened to include the months leading up to the second Iraq war. The headlines considered in this study are selected for their relevance to Middle East issues and for their importance. While headline translation has received some attention from scholars, there is little or nothing in the literature that deals specifically with the translation of English language headlines into Arabic.

Japanese Translations of the Jesuit Mission Press, 1590-1614
2002 0-7734-6918-4
Through examples, the methods of translation and editing used by the mission press in its attempt to produce a native Christian literature for Japan is explored. Part One examines two translations of De Imitatio Christi - Contemptus mundi jenbu and the Kontemutsusu munji, a later version. Part Two examines Guia de Pecadores - Giya do pekadoru. The study details their background, structure and style, with a textual analysis and comparison. The author identifies the translations' Buddhist terminology, the only religious language available to the Jesuits in Japan, and explains how Buddhist terms were used to convey Christian ideas.

John Wesley's Book Stock and the Arminian Magazine Catalogue of 1789
2006 0-7734-5541-8
This study is an attempt to place John and Charles Wesley and their Methodist organization within the general context of the eighteenth century book trade in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, and parts of British North America. John Wesley proposed to spread his evangelical message through the sale and distribution of books and depended on the income of those books to allow for the mission’s operation and conduct. The Book Stock fulfilled these two objectives, albeit with personal and organizational difficulties. The Arminian Magazine “Catalogue” of 1789, the subject of this study, helps demonstrate and define Wesley’s role as an eighteenth century publisher.

Ladies Magazine, 1749-53
2002 0-7734-6979-6
Considered a publication with information and articles specific for "ladies of society" in Colonial America.

Lady’s Monthly Museum First Series: 1798-1806 an Annotated Index Under Contributors’ Names, Pseudonuymous Signature, and Ascriptions
2000 0-7734-7836-1


Le Journal Historique, Politique, Critique et Galant (1719) by Justus Van Effen. A Critical Edition
2008 0-7734-5136-6
Le Journal historique, politique, critique et galant (1719) by Justus van Effen attempts to give the news of the day in “all of Europe”and presents a fascinating moment in European history, paying special attention to the Quadruple Alliance and the impending war. . . In addition to providing insight into an interesting hybrid periodical, Le Journal historique, politique, critique et galant gives a remarkable view of life in early 1719 from the perspective of seasoned journalist Justus van Effen. In French.

Letters From Nineteenth Century American Children to Robert Merry’s Museum Magazine
2001 0-7734-7505-2
Published from 1841 to 1872, Robert Merry’s Museum was the premiere American children’s magazine of its time (its editors included Samuel Goodrich, S. T. Allen, John N. Stearns, and Louisa May Alcott), and the first American periodical for children to publish letters from its subscribers. They often told ‘Uncle Robert’ all about themselves, their families, and their activities: the result is a record of the lives of ordinary people in nineteenth-century America. Here is the growing pre-War sectionalism, the Civil War and its aftermath, attitudes toward minorities and public figures, women’s rights, and major events. The collection of over 600 letters will appeal to those interested in American social history, women’s studies, media history, and popular culture.

Letters to Mr. Urban of the Gentleman's Magazine, 1751-1811
1997 0-7734-8427-2
Gentleman's Magazine, begun in 1731, soon featured a section devoted to letters from various correspondents on many subjects, from all parts of Britain and abroad. Many of the letter-writers were clergymen, many were antiquaries. Some accompanied their letters with drawings, inscriptions, and sketches. There was virtually no subject left untouched, and there is information of one kind or another, neglected by scholars in many branches of learning. Readers of this volume will find biographical information, literary criticism, Shakespeare criticism, theatrical data, and bibliographic material. Table of Contents: Richard Greene, Curator of His Own Museum; William Bickerstaffe, An Active Curate; Theophilus Lobb, Pii hominis; Samuel Watson, Another Quiet Life; Thomas Holt White, Brother of Gilbert White of Selborne; John Kynaston, A Neglected Shakespearean; Joseph Boerhadem, Old-Fashined Clergyman; The Reverend Mr. Samuel Badcock, Reviewer for the Monthly Review; H. N., Unidentified Scholar; Samuel Ayscough of the British Museum, Prince of Index-Makers; Henry Lemoine, Hack of all Trades; John Elderton, Chaplain to the Earl of Cork and Orrery

Literary Magazine and British Review ( London: 1788-1794). An Annotated Catalog of the Prose and Verse ( Book One)
2005 0-7734-6134-5
Pitcher’s annotated catalogue of its contents (Literary Magazine and British Review for 1788) reveals its explicit emphasis on biography. The great majority of these articles concern French notables, or the less familiar characters attached to them, with a clear editorial interest in contemporaries active in the ferment of the French Revolution. The emphasis on things French is also reflected in reviews and articles translated from French sources (including papers published by scientific societies). The editor records details of the original poems from “Angelina,” but generally shows that the magazine reprints conventional fare. The “American Connection” is shown to be implicit from the outset of publication insomuch as the spelling adopted in early volumes is that established by Noah Webster, and not that followed by every other British magazine (or the Literary after 1791). Pitcher also remarks where the political bias of this magazine is strong and conspicuous.

Literary Magazine and British Review ( London: 1788-1794). An Annotated Catalog of the Prose and Verse ( Book Two)
2005 0-7734-6136-1
Pitcher’s annotated catalogue of its contents (Literary Magazine and British Review for 1788) reveals its explicit emphasis on biography. The great majority of these articles concern French notables, or the less familiar characters attached to them, with a clear editorial interest in contemporaries active in the ferment of the French Revolution. The emphasis on things French is also reflected in reviews and articles translated from French sources (including papers published by scientific societies). The editor records details of the original poems from “Angelina,” but generally shows that the magazine reprints conventional fare. The “American Connection” is shown to be implicit from the outset of publication insomuch as the spelling adopted in early volumes is that established by Noah Webster, and not that followed by every other British magazine (or the Literary after 1791). Pitcher also remarks where the political bias of this magazine is strong and conspicuous. Given this degree of editorial liberal-mindedness, Pitcher concludes in this two-volume study that it is a tribute to British tolerance that the magazine lasted as long as the middle of 1794, although admittedly the optimistically liberal politics championed early were sadly betrayed by le terreur (June 1793 – July 1794), and in the final two years, the Literary Magazine and British Review became increasingly less outspoken.

Literary Prose of Westminster Magazine 1773-1785. An Annotated Index Under Contributors’ Names, Pseudonymous Signature, and Ascriptions
2000 0-7734-7834-5
Table of Contents: Introduction; Annotated Index to Authors of Prose; Alphabetical file for titles of Prose Articles; Biographical Subject Index; Castles and Views Subject Index; Education Subject Index; Religion Subject Index; Trials and Executions Subject Index; Works Cited

Loiterer
2006 0-7734-5657-0
The Oxford-based weekly periodical, The Loiterer, which appeared from January 31, 1789 to March 20, 1790, was the creation of both James Austen and his younger brother, Henry. Although the work of both men would be obscured by the achievements of their sister, Jane, their own writing deserves attention. The Loiterer represents an important stage in the history and development of the periodical essay as an English literary mode or genre.

Magazine Sources for Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments, by Mr. Addison (London 1794-1797)
2004 0-7734-6575-8
The Interesting Anecdotes by “Mr. Addison” are generally identified as a multi-volume miscellany of prose and verse, collected in 1794-97, but the extant volumes dated 1797 are apparently reissues of volumes which appeared earlier. While the listings here usefully document specific borrowings, the data also suggest the way in which literary magazines had become a resource to spur growth in that part of publishing which provided miscellanies and ‘judicious selections’ to the common reader.

Mormon and Asian American Model Minority Discourses in News and Popular Magazines
2004 0-7734-6375-5
Manuscript situates news and popular magazines’ coverage of Asian Americans and Mormons within model minority discourse, explains the discourse’s problematic nature, and points out how the two discourses shape power relations between majorities and minorities in American society. The book employs critical discourse analysis, a powerful tool to uncover ideology within dominant discourses and challenge unequal power structures in society. By so doing, it aims to improve society for minority groups. The book also explores journalistic narrative. By following conventional narrative forms and shared cultural meanings, journalists often adopt established cultural norms and reinforce status quo ideologies. Chen’s goal is not simply to analyze the model minority discourse in news and popular magazines or merely to provide a critique of journalists’ conventional narrative forms. She also uses her analysis of journalistic discourse as a means of consciousness-raising—for both minority groups and journalists—and to further encourage alternative approaches to writing about minority groups.

Mustering of Support for World War I by the Ladies' Home Journal
1997 0-7734-2250-1
Concentrates mainly on the visual ways in which The Ladies' Home Journal conveyed the Journal's political and social views in its wartime editions. It demonstrates how the editor, Edward Bok, orchestrated elements of his magazine to serve his editorial vision, namely that the United States should be involved in the Great War, and in enlisting the active support of the readers.

New American Magazine (Woodbridge, New Jersey, January 1758-March 1760)
2004 0-7734-6346-1
The New American Magazine contained installment features, stories, essays, poems, news, chronicles and lists, the conventional kinds of offering of the established British magazines. The contents of the New American Magazine have been recorded here in a month-by-month Register, with all the articles separately listed by title and initial wording.

New Novelist’s Magazine (London 1786-1788)
2006 0-7734-6141-8
This “elegant collection of the many beautiful little tales and stories scattered throughout innumerable voluminous miscellanies” (Advertisement) was directly inspired by the success of Harrison and Co.’s weekly serialization of their Novelist’s Magazine (1780-88, collected in 23 volumes), but also one of a series of experiments in short-run magazine publications, mixing original with reprinted materials.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 1
2006 0-7734-5607-4
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 2
2006 0-7734-5605-8
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Magazine, or Literary Repository (1790-1797). Vol. 3
2006 0-7734-5603-1
The three volumes that make up this work are the records of the contents of The New York Magazine from the years 1790 to 1797. This study contributes to ordering the data and easing the ongoing work of assessing the worth of this magazine. Its intention is to make further examination of The New-York Magazine easier and to parade facts useful to students of the history of magazines or of popular culture.

New York Weekly Magazine. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose, 1800-1811.
2000 0-7734-7840-X
The New York Weekly began May 17, 1788, as The Impartial Gazetteer and Saturday Evening Post, published by John Harrisson and Stephen Purdy. Both profitable and popular, it culled works from such magazines as Westminster, Town and Country, European, London, Universal, and Lady’s. This catalog is designed to assist those who have learned the value of studying the lesser literature of this period. In addition to the main alphabetical listings, several special-interest headings have been used in a selective ‘subject index’.

Pennsylvania Magazine or American Monthly Museum, Philadelphia, 1775-76
2001 0-7734-7326-2
The journal's purpose was to present information and correspondence about "significant" events and cultural activities that were relevant to the Colonies and not to Europe.

Repository and Ladies Weekly Museum, Philadelphia 1800-06. An Annotated Index of the Literary Prose with Notes on Authors, Signatures, and Sources
2001 0-7734-7499-4
Reference guide to multi-faceted journal.

Royal American Magazine, 1774-75. An Annotated Catalog
2001 0-7734-7405-6
Documenting of the contents of The Royal American Magazine, or Universal Repository of Instruction and Amusement, published in Boston, January 1774-March 1775.

Royal Magazine or, Gentleman’s Monthly Companion, 1759-1769
2007 0-7734-6743-2
Intended to complement the information in volume 8 of the series, this work offers a comprehensive list of prose articles published in the Royal Magazine: or Gentleman's Monthly Companion (London: J. Coote 1759-69). Arranged chronologically by issue.

Rural Magazine or, Vermont Repository ( Rutland: January 1795 - December 1796)
2005 0-7734-6115-9
This collection was, the title page avowed, “devoted to Literary, Moral, Historical, and Political Improvement,” and editor Samuel Williams set out in particular to address the interests of the citizens of Vermont by “collecting and preserving such papers and proceedings” and such original “historical and political documents, literary, civil or ecclesiastical” as would “exhibit to the public a general account and view of the state and progress of society, in this part of the Federal Union (Preface to Number One, Volume One). The analysis of the magazine by Pitcher shows that Williams seems to have set out to model his magazine after Mathew Carey’s American Museum (Philadelphia 1787-92), especially in its divisions into several departments and interest in history and politics, and he used it as a source when he needed to fill his own columns. Williams gave substantial attention to American subjects, important archival materials of Vermont in particular, and, as befitted a “Rural Magazine,” he paid due regard to agricultural, medical, botanical and zoological matters (and subjects touching material culture in other areas).

Studia Mystica
1998
This annual journal includes contributions on mysticism and visionary literature in any cultural or religious tradition, and essays that explore connections among mysticism, the arts, and the humanities, employing interdisciplinary and comparative approaches.

Study of German Political-Cultural Periodicals From the Years of Allied Occupation 1945-1949
2000 0-7734-7781-0
Focusing on five journals, Aufbau, Ost und West, Der Monat, Der Ruf, and Frankfurter Hefte, it reveals the scope and nature of opinion in Germany during occupation rule and before formal division. These journals provide a representative sample of opinion on a range of subjects. Prominent among these issues are Europe, cultural and political representation, collective guilt and denazification. Some areas of enquiry, notably Third Way politics and the exploration of guilt and national history, were subsequently undervalued in the dominant historical narratives of the Cold War. With their wide range of contributors and concerns, these journals chart this intense debate, highlight the course of cultural politics in East and West, and shed light on the extent of Cold War intrusion on the post-war recovery of German thought and discourse.

Universal Spectator (London 1728-1746)
2004 0-7734-6409-3
The Universal Spectator was published in 907 weekly issues from October 12, 1728 through February 22, 1746. With the exception of the essay journals conducted by Addison and Steele, there is no literary periodical of the first half of the eighteenth century with a better claim to originality and variety.

Weekly Miscellany Sherborne, 1773-83. Vol. 1
2002 0-7734-7000-X
Contains volumes of a weekly periodical printed and edited in Sherborne by Robert Goadby.

Weekly Miscellany Sherborne, 1773-83. Vol. 2
2002 0-7734-6605-3
Contains volumes of a weekly periodical printed and edited in Sherborne by Robert Goadby.

Wit's Magazine, or Library of Momus ( London: Harrison & Co., 1784-85)
2006 0-7734-5599-X
This catalogue embraces the poetry, stories, anecdotes, and essays of this “Library of Momus” published in seventeen monthly numbers (January 1784 through May 1785). The copious minor verses pieces (rebuses, paradoxes, epitaphs, epigrams, distiches, etc.) in “The Sphinx” have not been indexed by first line or title, but such entries are given short notice, with authors’ names and signatures recorded, in the Register of each monthly part. There are no reviews, political sections or news departments in the magazine. Materials for the magazine were to be selected from the best authors to supplement original contributions in prose and verse, and that articles would not be confined to the humorous or witty.