Subject Area: Liberia

African American Quest for Institutions of Higher Education Before the Civil War: The Forgotten Histories of the Ashmun Institute, Liberia College and Avery College
2010 0-7734-1309-X
This study advances the understanding of black education during the antebellum era. It investigates the important ideological divisions that drove access to higher education for African Americans : the African Colonization Movement (A.C.S.), 1817–1862; and the Abolitionist Movement, 1830–1865. This study also provides some of the actual histories of those individuals who succeeded in obtaining an education as well as the histories of the institutions that served them. This book contains nineteen black and white photographs.

Alexander Crummell (1819-1898) and the Creation of an African - American Church in Liberia
1990 0-88946-074-4
A pioneering work that draws on extensive research in archives in England and the United States to shed new light on Alexander Crummell, generally regarded as the leading black intellectual of the nineteenth century. Charts Crummell's extraordinary career as a writer, teacher, orator, and minister and explores his relationships with such persons as E. W. Blyden, John Edward Bruce, and W. E. B. DuBois. Pays particular attention to Crummell's work as a missionary with the Protestant Episcopal Church in West Africa. Uncovers for the first time his role in the creation of a national (Episcopal) church in Liberia and sheds new light on the genesis of his romantic racialism.

Cultural Politics of Religious Change A Study of the Sanoyea Kpelle in Liberia
1986 0-88946-177-5
A detailed study based on American Lutheran missionary accounts and other unpublished documents.

Culture in Liberia an Afrocentric View of the Cultural Interaction Between the Indigenous Liberians and the Americo-Liberians
1998 0-7734-8333-0
This study argues that despite political antagonism between the minority Americo-Liberians and the majority indigenous Liberians, there was a healthy and effective interaction, which created a sort of cultural dualism in Liberia to the benefit of the African heritage.

Dependency and the Foreign Policy of a Small Power the Liberian Case
1992 0-7734-9813-3
The book assesses the relationship between the economic dependence of Third World States and their foreign policy orientations, specifically examining the impact of dependency on the foreign policy of Liberia. Using three major indices - foreign aid, trade and investment - the study gauges the dependency-foreign-power nexus in a sample of eight cases; four capitalist states (United States, Britain, the Federal Republic of Germany, France), and four socialist states (the then USSR, People's Republic of China, German Democratic Republic, and Romania).

Effects of United States' Political Communication and the Liberian Experience (1960-1990). An Afrocentric Analysis
1997 0-7734-2210-2
This study examines the dynamics of U.S. communications and information systems, and the extent to which they are used to maximize American interests in Liberia in particular and in Africa in general. This conceptual approach delineates the foundation and hence the implementation of U.S. economic, cultural, political and military interests vis-a-vis other nation-states.

History of Agriculture in Liberia, 1882-1970 Transference of American Values
1990 0-88946-518-5
While historians have argued that Americo-Liberians neglected agriculture and remained addicted to trade, this study shows that Americo-Liberians seriously attempted to correct this imbalance and, in the course of doing so, introduced a formal agriculture and transferred some social and economic values from the New World.

Issues of Sovereignty, Strategy and Security in the Economic Community of West African States ( ECOWAS ) Intervention in the Liberian Civil War
2003 0-7734-6806-4
Using the ECOWAS experience in Liberia, the book analyses the strengths and weaknesses of regional intervention in internal wars. It convincingly argues that in conditions of state collapse sovereignty cannot be invoked; that economic, political and military issues must be addressed for any successful regional intervention; and that security outcomes of an intervention help to judge its success or failure.

Memoirs of a Liberian Ambassador: George Arthur Padmore
1996 0-7734-8744-1
It is a rarity that participants of the Liberian political scene commit to writing their impressions of events. Ambassador Padmore joins perhaps only the late Vice-President C. L. Simpson and Professor T. O. Dosumo-Johnson in providing eyewitness glimpses into recent decades of Liberian political history. His fascinating memoirs highlight events such highlights as the transfer of power from President King to President Barclay in 1930, the Barclay to Tubman succession in 1944, and the Ambassador's own eventful tour of service as Liberia's Ambassador to the United States, 1956-1961. The portrayal of the character, personality and leadership style of President Barclay, a Liberian philosopher-king (if ever there was one) stands as yet another dimension of the contribution of this rare socio-political recollection to scholarship.

Popular Political Culture, Civil Society, and State Crisis in Liberia
2003 0-7734-6617-7
This study focuses on deeply embedded political values that are shared by the vast majority of Liberia’s population. The book’s conclusions that Liberian politics failed because of civil society’s illiberal overemphasis on stability and order at the expense of tolerance, accountability, and adaptability challenge much of conventional scholarship both about Liberia and about Africa in general. In terms of policy, the book suggests that far more attention will need to be paid to local norms and perspectives if strategies linked to democratization and economic rationalization are to succeed. While the overall theoretical concerns of the book are drawn from the fields of political science and history, it contains a large amount of anecdotal material on popular political culture and civil society, from wedding showers, pop songs, disciplinary practices at schools, and folk tales, to the constitution of a village soccer club. Using tools and methodology from anthropology, theology, and folklore, it interprets deep cultural values found in all segments of Liberian society.