Subject Area: Korea

Americans and Chinese at the Korean War Cease-Fire Negotiations 1950-1953
2001 0-7734-7424-2
This study applies the most recently released government documents from Russian and Chinese archives and updated English scholarship to the analysis of both US and Chinese diplomatic activities.

Ancestor Worship and Christianity in Korea
1989 0-88946-059-0
Written entirely by Korean Christians, this study analyzes the tension between ancestor worship and Christianity from several perspectives: traditional folk religion, Korean Christianity, Confucianism, and Japanese religion during the Korean occupation of Japan.

Confucian Roots of Fundamentalist Ethos in the Korean Presbyterian Church
2006 0-7734-5738-0
This study locates the cultural roots of the fundamentalist ethos of the Korean Presbyterian Church in Confucian social conservatism and Korean Neo-Confucian fundamentalism.

Family Lineage Records as a Resource for Korean History
2007 0-7734-5339-3
This book presents, amplifies, and breathes life into a sample of a Korean lineage records, and as such, seeks to fill the gap in scholarship that lies between simple recognition of the existence of these chokpo and a deeper comprehension of their contents. It erases the mystique surrounding Korean lineage records and makes these records accessible to any English speaking reader. By examining one family line in great detail, readers will be introduced to this unique Korean asset, and the wealth of material hidden in these volumes. This book contains 12 Color Photos and 15 Black and White Photos

Gorbachev’s Foreign Policy Toward the Korean Peninsula, 1985-1991 Power and Reform
2000 0-7734-7817-5
This is the first volume in English to comprehensively analyze Gorbachev’s foreign policy toward the two Koreas. Drawing on interviews with key officials of South Korea and the Soviet Union/Russia and utilizing materials written in English, Korean, and Russian, Joo systematically explores the Soviet Union’s shifting goals and behavior toward the two Koreas, while focusing on the influence of Gorbachev’s shifting power position within the Soviet leadership on his Korea policy. Insightful and informative, this volume will be of interest to students of Soviet, post-Soviet, and Korean foreign relations, and to all those interested in the dynamic relationship between Gorbachev’s power consolidation at home and his foreign policy behavior.

Ham Sŏkhŏn’s Pacifism and the Reunification of Korea
2006 0-7734-5651-1
This book explores the extent to which Ham Sŏkhŏn’s Quaker involvement affected his approach to Korean Reunification Theology (KRT), and the degree to which elements of KRT can be located within Quaker Peace Testimony (QPT). For this, QPT, Ham’s ideas of peace, and KRT are explored in turn, and in particular Ham’s ideas of peace are considered as a bridge between QPT and KRT.

It is suggested that the twentieth-century QPT was peace-centric, tolerant, and based in pluralism clearly different from the nineteenth century anti-war testimony. It is argued that liberal Quakerism influenced the shifts of QPT. Conscientious Objection and relief are considered as concrete expressions of the twentieth century QPT.

Ham S?kh?n’s ideas of peace are analyzed in terms of three key ideas: pacifism, non-violence and the minjung. It is argued that Ham’s Christian pacifism was awakened by the QPT and it stimulated Ham’s ideas of peace. It is also suggested that Ham’s Quaker experience was parallel to his pacifist practice. The book explores the thought that Ham’s ideas of reunification are based on his ideas of peace, and that they influence KRT. Five reunification theologians’ thinking and key ideas are explored and then Ham’s influence on them is considered. It is suggested that QPT and Ham’s ideas of peace share common ground in their ideas of pacifism, non-violence and humanitarianism (of the minjung), and that KRT was influenced by Ham’s ideas of reunification particularly in regard to his ideas of peace. Consequently, connection between the QPT and KRT can be considered through Ham’s ideas of peace.

This book proves that there is a connection between parts of QPT, Ham’s ideas of peace and KRT, provides an original contribution to knowledge, and increases the academic understanding of both Ham’s life and thought, and the nature of KRT.

History of the Orthodox Church in China, Korea and Japan
2006 0-7734-5886-7
This book describes the history and development of the Orthodox Church in China from its origins in 1242 A.D., its Eastern Church forebears, and its development in the other nations of North Asia – Korea and Japan.

By 1955, on the eve of its establishment as an independent entity, the Orthodox Church in China reached its greatest numbers. There were more than 100,000 communicants in former Russian territory in Manchuria, with 200 priests and 60 parishes, as well as monasteries and a seminary. Elsewhere, in China, there were another 200,000 Orthodox Christians and 150 parishes. These conservative figures mean that at that time, around 6% of Chinese Christians were adherents of the Orthodox Church.

The activities and achievements of the Orthodox Church, especially since the 17th century, have been understated in many historical studies of Christianity in China.

It is a similar story in regard to the first impact of Christianity with the cultures of Japan and Korea. Eastern Christianity came to Japan from China between the seventh and ninth centuries. There is also evidence that Eastern Christian missionaries were present in Korea during the sixth century. This book details the nature and evidence of these early activities.

Homeland Conceptions and Ethnic Integration Among Kazakhstan’s Germans and Koreans
2004 0-7734-6311-9
Through comparative analysis of the reactions of Kazakhstan’s Germans and Koreans to the emergence of an independent Republic of Kazakhstan, this book enhances understanding of firstly, the conflicting dynamics of socio-political integration in post-Soviet space; secondly the role played by “kin-states” in the creation or negation of “return myths,”; and thirdly, the significance of small-scale homelands in the process of de-and re-territorializing identity. The analysis in this study combines library/archival research with survey and interview data from the late independence period (1996-2002) in an effort to elucidate the interactive nature of place, power, and identity.

Idea of Human Dignity in Korea
2007 0-7734-5324-5
This study explores the idea of human dignity in the Human Dignity Clause stipulated in the Constitution of South Korea, maintaining that to indigenize the imported idea of human dignity in Korean society, the idea must not only be translated into terms resonant with Korean culture but must also be implemented in the institutions of Korean society. This study will contribute toward an exploration of a more integrative understanding of the notion of human dignity as the basis for human rights, both in the Western conception, derived from Cicero’s formula, “dignitas hominis”, which was expanded in the Christian idea of the dignity of “God-like person-in-community”, as compared with similar kinds of discourse in Korean intellectual history, namely the idea of the supreme and relational worth of a “Heaven-like (han?l kat’?n) person-in-Han-community”. This work will contribute to an interdisciplinary understanding of the question of human dignity and should appeal to scholars in law, sociology, philosophy, ethics, theology, and comparative religious studies.

Korean and American Monastic Practices a Comparative Case Study Songgwang-Sa Son Buddhist Monastery, Korea, and the Abbey of the Genesee, Cistercian Monastery, U. S. A.
1997 0-7734-2251-X
This is a case study of contemporary monasticism in cross-cultural perspective with particular reference to one Korean Son monastery in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, and one Cistercian monastery in the Roman Catholic tradition in North America. Korea has preserved one of the oldest and richest Buddhist traditions in Asia, and Korean Son monasticism has remained most faithful to what may be considered closest to the traditional form of Buddhist monastic life, and offers an alternative practice to the usual Western portrayals of Ch'an/Zen Buddhism. Compares historical backgrounds; motivational dispositions; and structures of monastic life. A final part is an appraisal of contemporary monastic ideal and trends in its development.

Life and Thought of Henry Gerhard Appenzeller (1858-1902), Missionary to Korea
1989 0-88946-069-8
Biography of the pioneering founder of Methodism in Korea who played a crucial role in opening Korea to the West.

Perspectives on Christianity in Korea and Japan the Gospel and Culture in East Asia
1995 0-7734-8868-5
These essays resulted from a project on "Christianity in East Asia" co-sponsored by Meiji Gakuin University's Institute for Christian Studies and the Global Mission Unit of the Presbyterian Church (USA), and are written by scholars who are themselves mainly from East Asia. The papers, using an intraregional approach (i.e. Christianity in Japan from a Korean perspective and vice-versa) deal with various aspects of the transplantation and historical development of Christianity, explore various aspects of the Christian encounter with indigenous religions and societies, and consider some of the major difficulties faced by the transplanted religion. The perspectives offered here will be useful to scholars in Asian studies and religion, to those engaged in theological education and mission studies, and to church administrators responsible for policy and direction in mission planning.

Political Unification of Korea in the 1990s: Key to World Peace
1989 0-88946-595-9
The first comprehensive scholarly analysis of the subject of the unification of Korea. Presents a systematic way to consider the unification issue from theoretical and practical aspects and in the light of the future.

Religion and Politics in Korea Under the Japanese Rule
1986 0-88946-056-6
A documented study of major religions and their relationship to politics in Korea from 1910-1945. ". . . a balanced treatment of this intensely controversial subject. . . . we are fortunate in having this even-handed study to cover what has hitherto been a relatively neglected era of modern Korean religious history. . . . a valuable contribution to the history of religions in modern Korea." _ International Bulletin of Missionary Research

Technology Policy of the Korean State Since 1961: Successful Development of Science and Technology
2009 0-7734-4883-7
This book examines the differences in technology development across industries in Korea, and the ruling government at the time of policy enactment.

U. S.-South Korean Alliance, 1961-1988: Free-Riding or Bargaining?
2002 0-7734-7345-9
In this study, Lee and Heo confront the conventional wisdom about burden-sharing in military alliances through a detailed and extensive examination of the USA-Korean military pact. Domestic politics, as much as international concerns, emerge as the key factors that define the context within which the USA and Korea negotiated the level of Korea’s contribution to the alliance.

Women and Politics in Japan and Korea
2004 0-7734-6374-7
This book is about the role of women in Korean and Japanese politics over the past century. It is exceedingly rare to have a comparative analysis of politics in Japan and the Republic of Korea, which gives this book a special status. At the same time these are countries with remarkably low levels of political participation by women, so it is very important to have an analysis of the reasons for this outcome. In the 1970s women accounted for less than two percent of legislative representatives in Japan, and less than one percent in Korea; today women constitute about seven percent of the members in each legislature, but these levels are still comparatively low in the developed world: about forty-three percent of Sweden’s legislators are women, and women constitute more than 30 percent of Germany’s Bundestag; the level in the U.S. Congress is about thirteen per cent.

The explanation for this phenomenon is by no means simple, and the author traverses a complex argument beginning with the “late” industrialization of both countries, followed by long periods of military rule and excesses of nationalism in both that until relatively recently subordinated women to state-sponsored goals of rapid development and national unity, to the situation today where, at least in Korea, the role of women in politics is growing rapidly. Her account is based on numerous interviews in Korea and Japan, a deft use of public opinion polls, and a wide comparative reading in the literature on the history and politics of both countries. After examining a host of theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding the role of women in politics, she combines an historical analysis with an examination of patriarchal culture in Japan and Korea, and then scrutinizes the way in which the two respective political systems have both formal and informal mechanisms that militate against women’s participation. Furthermore at many points in the text she makes comparative judgments concerning women’s participation in Europe and the United States.

Both Korean and Japanese history in the early 20th century were marked by women who fought multiple battles on several fronts: to get any recognition at all outside the demands of the home, to fight discrimination against any woman who would dare challenge the suffocating society-wide support for family-based patriarchy, to suffer ostracism for joining socialist groups (which tended to more open to women) or for living lives independent of men (for which they were labeled promiscuous and even a threat to national unity). Ichikawa Fusae, the founder of Japan’s Women’s Suffrage League in 1924, suffered much ridicule from the society for decades, only to be forced into supporting Japan’s wars in Asia. Korea was then a colony, not a nation, but from the early point of the massive March First Movement in 1919 right down to the present, when thousands of civic groups and NGOs co-exist in Korea’s strong civil society, women have often been the leaders of protests. This sharp contrast with Japan makes for one of the most interesting aspects of this book.

Her discussion of how the postwar Japanese political system excludes women (without necessarily intending to do so) is also particularly illuminating. The Liberal Democratic Party, in power continuously since 1955 (with one brief interruption in 1993), is made up of factions which resemble one-man political machines or groups, with strong ties of patronage and favoritism in the local areas. These virtually all-male informal networks of patron-client ties, reinforced by male bonding rituals in drinking houses all over Japan, represent a formidable barrier to the entry of women into political careers. Even civic and grass-roots organizations seeking progressive goals tend to be run by men in Japan.

On the other hand, the largest number of women representatives in the history of the Republic of Korea is seen under the system of the Revitalization Congress. However, given the nature of the Congress at the time, one can hardly say their representation had much to do with the peoples’ will. Ironically though, the long history of the dictatorial military regimes gave Korean women the opportunity to hear their own political voices, and through their participations in anti-dictatorial protest movements they gained political experiences necessary to engage in politics in the future. She interviewed and observed many women involved in grassroots political organizing; their future seems to be a comparatively bright one compared to women in Japan, who still have not found a route to significant participation in the world’s second-largest economy.

Won Buddhism a History and Theology of Korea's New Religion
1997 0-7734-8436-1
This groundbreaking work is the first full-length study in English of Won Buddhism, now regarded as one of the major six religions in South Korea.