Subject Area: Greece

Function of the Ekkyklema in Greek Theatre: The Sculptural Display of Murdered Victims and the Success of Greek Tragedy for the State
2015 0-7734-3527-1
A new take on the topic with considerable new scholarship about how the ekkyklema worked semiotically, dramaturgically and politically within Greek tragedy. In this fascinating and well-documented cultural study the author explores the proposition that the success of Greek tragedy was connected to the pre-mediated use of religious tropes in the drama, thus triggering profoundly ancient and effective traditional loyalties.

Hellenica (Greek History) of Xenophon of Athens
2006 0-7734-5997-9
In the fourth century B.C., Xenophon wrote a history of his time, intended to serve as a continuation of Thucydides’ Peloponnesian Wars. The present text is the first to be based upon the four important manuscript witnesses determined to be significant in published studies by Professor Jackson. The result is a text free of many unfounded readings accepted into earlier editions and an economical critical apparatus. Professor Doty’s new idiomatic English translation which accompanies the Greek text mirrors Xenophon’s unadorned style and is the first to make use of the new text.

Hymn Fragments in the New Testament. Hellenistic Jewish and Greco- Roman Parallels
2008 0-7734-4923-X
This study investigates the three main images of Christ in the material normally designated as hymnic in the New Testament (Phil 2:6-11, 1 Cor 8:6, Col 1:15-20, John 1:1-18, Heb 1:3-4, 1 Tim 3:16), specifically the images of Christ the pre-existent divinity, Christ the Creator and Christ the Incarnate god. It is the position of the author that the closest literary antecedents for the first two images can be found in the literary world of Hellenistic Jewish wisdom speculation, specifically that subset of Hellenistic Jewish wisdom speculation influenced by Middle Platonic thought and exemplified by the works of Philo of Alexandria. The final image, that of Christ the Incarnate god, finds its’ most compelling literary antecedents in works of Greco-Roman religious thought and philosophy, specifically those myths which deal with gods taking human form and serving as slaves. The image of the god as flesh, a subset of those images which deal with Christ as an incarnate god, however, fails to be easily classified as deriving from either Hellenistic Jewish or Greco-Roman literary images.

New Approach to Rural Development in Europe - Germany, Greece, Scotland and Sweden
2004 0-7734-6515-4
Work is based on reports from a research project funded by the European Union for the purpose of investigating differential economic performance among rural areas in similar geographic and policy environments in Scotland, Greece, Germany, and Sweden. The report identifies and measures the impact of development on rural areas in relationship to economic growth or decline.

Translation From Ancient Greek Into English of Xenophon’s Manual on the Duties of a Cavalry Commander
2011 0-7734-1599-8
This text is the first translation of Xenophon’s Manual on the Duties of a Cavalry Commander in over a century.