Subject Area: Greece

Function of the Ekkyklema in Greek Theatre: The Sculptural Display of Murdered Victims and the Success of Greek Tragedy for the State
2015 0-7734-3527-1
A new take on the topic with considerable new scholarship about how the ekkyklema worked semiotically, dramaturgically and politically within Greek tragedy. In this fascinating and well-documented cultural study the author explores the proposition that the success of Greek tragedy was connected to the pre-mediated use of religious tropes in the drama, thus triggering profoundly ancient and effective traditional loyalties.

How the Images in Plato’s Dialogues Develop a Life of Their Own
2011 0-7734-3934-X
An attempt to explain how Plato’s use of imagery in his dialogues affects his philosophy.

Hymn Fragments in the New Testament: Hellenistic Jewish and Greco- Roman Parallels
2008 0-7734-4923-X
This study investigates the three main images of Christ in the material normally designated as hymnic in the New Testament (Phil 2:6-11, 1 Cor 8:6, Col 1:15-20, John 1:1-18, Heb 1:3-4, 1 Tim 3:16), specifically the images of Christ the pre-existent divinity, Christ the Creator and Christ the Incarnate god. It is the position of the author that the closest literary antecedents for the first two images can be found in the literary world of Hellenistic Jewish wisdom speculation, specifically that subset of Hellenistic Jewish wisdom speculation influenced by Middle Platonic thought and exemplified by the works of Philo of Alexandria. The final image, that of Christ the Incarnate god, finds its’ most compelling literary antecedents in works of Greco-Roman religious thought and philosophy, specifically those myths which deal with gods taking human form and serving as slaves. The image of the god as flesh, a subset of those images which deal with Christ as an incarnate god, however, fails to be easily classified as deriving from either Hellenistic Jewish or Greco-Roman literary images.

Index to the Three Works by Ioannes Lydus (de Mensibus, De Ostentis, De Magistratibus)
2012 0-7734-4528-5
The objective of this edition is textual and translational in nature. Since the works of Lydus are replete with Latin vocabulary, this book serves to bring it into English. The translation is faithful to the original and accurate so as to express Lydus’ intended thoughts. His repetitious use of certain linguistic expressions, although sometimes awkward to render to English, have been retained in order to capture his peculiar linguistic and seemingly crabbed style. The book tries to put his words into working English for the first time, and the translators were meticulous in trying to do a tight word for word translation based on the text, free from interpretation.

On Celestial Signs (de Ostentis)
2012 0-7734-4524-2
The objective of this edition is textual and translational in nature. Since the works of Lydus are replete with Latin vocabulary, this book serves to bring it into English. The translation is faithful to the original and accurate so as to express Lydus’ intended thoughts. His repetitious use of certain linguistic expressions, although sometimes awkward to render to English, have been retained in order to capture his peculiar linguistic and seemingly crabbed style. The book tries to put his words into working English for the first time, and the translators were meticulous in trying to do a tight word for word translation based on the text, free from interpretation.

On Powers, or the Magistracies of the Roman State (de Magistratibus Republicae Romanae)
2012 0-7734-4526-9
The objective of this edition is textual and translational in nature. Since the works of Lydus are replete with Latin vocabulary, this book serves to bring it into English. The translation is faithful to the original and accurate so as to express Lydus’ intended thoughts. His repetitious use of certain linguistic expressions, although sometimes awkward to render to English, have been retained in order to capture his peculiar linguistic and seemingly crabbed style. The book tries to put his words into working English for the first time, and the translators were meticulous in trying to do a tight word for word translation based on the text, free from interpretation.

On the Months (de Mensibus): Three Works of Ioannes Lydus
2012 0-7734-4522-6
The objective of this edition is textual and translational in nature. Since the works of Lydus are replete with Latin vocabulary, this book serves to bring it into English. The translation is faithful to the original and accurate so as to express Lydus’ intended thoughts. His repetitious use of certain linguistic expressions, although sometimes awkward to render to English, have been retained in order to capture his peculiar linguistic and seemingly crabbed style. The book tries to put his words into working English for the first time, and the translators were meticulous in trying to do a tight word for word translation based on the text, free from interpretation.

Tragedy and the Philosophical Life
2006 0-7734-5847-6
These books respond to Martha Nussbaum’s interpretation of Plato in The Fragility of Goodness: luck and ethics in Greek tragedy and philosophy. The author focuses her arguments on three issues: 1) Plato’s views did not change as radically as Dr. Nussbaum claims; 2) Plato is not anti-tragic; and 3) Plato’s dialogues go beyond tragedy, both in their form and in their content, without being anti-tragic. These claims are supported in four ways: 1) by applying Aristotle’s criteria for tragedy as a literary genre to Plato’s texts; 2) by applying a definition of tragedy as a worldview to Plato’s texts; 3) by examining Plato’s texts from the perspective of the literary traditions of his day; and 4) by a close analysis of the text. These books present a unique view of the philosophical life as a path out of tragedy and a unique understanding of how the character of Socrates exemplifies that life. Part One is a summary of Dr. Nussbaum’s view and of current research on these particular issues in Plato. Part Two is the author’s own contribution to the debate. Part Three is a closer examination of Dr. Nussbaum’s view and exactly where the author and Dr. Nussbaum disagree.

Tragedy and the Philosophical Life
2006 0-7734-5858-1
These books respond to Martha Nussbaum’s interpretation of Plato in The Fragility of Goodness: luck and ethics in Greek tragedy and philosophy. The author focuses her arguments on three issues: 1) Plato’s views did not change as radically as Dr. Nussbaum claims; 2) Plato is not anti-tragic; and 3) Plato’s dialogues go beyond tragedy, both in their form and in their content, without being anti-tragic. These claims are supported in four ways: 1) by applying Aristotle’s criteria for tragedy as a literary genre to Plato’s texts; 2) by applying a definition of tragedy as a worldview to Plato’s texts; 3) by examining Plato’s texts from the perspective of the literary traditions of his day; and 4) by a close analysis of the text. These books present a unique view of the philosophical life as a path out of tragedy and a unique understanding of how the character of Socrates exemplifies that life. Part One is a summary of Dr. Nussbaum’s view and of current research on these particular issues in Plato. Part Two is the author’s own contribution to the debate. Part Three is a closer examination of Dr. Nussbaum’s view and exactly where the author and Dr. Nussbaum disagree.

Tragedy and the Philosophical Life
2006 0-7734-5923-5
These books respond to Martha Nussbaum’s interpretation of Plato in The Fragility of Goodness: luck and ethics in Greek tragedy and philosophy. The author focuses her arguments on three issues: 1) Plato’s views did not change as radically as Dr. Nussbaum claims; 2) Plato is not anti-tragic; and 3) Plato’s dialogues go beyond tragedy, both in their form and in their content, without being anti-tragic. These claims are supported in four ways: 1) by applying Aristotle’s criteria for tragedy as a literary genre to Plato’s texts; 2) by applying a definition of tragedy as a worldview to Plato’s texts; 3) by examining Plato’s texts from the perspective of the literary traditions of his day; and 4) by a close analysis of the text. These books present a unique view of the philosophical life as a path out of tragedy and a unique understanding of how the character of Socrates exemplifies that life. Part One is a summary of Dr. Nussbaum’s view and of current research on these particular issues in Plato. Part Two is the author’s own contribution to the debate. Part Three is a closer examination of Dr. Nussbaum’s view and exactly where the author and Dr. Nussbaum disagree.

Translation From Ancient Greek Into English of Xenophon’s Manual on the Duties of a Cavalry Commander
2011 0-7734-1599-8
This text is the first translation of Xenophon’s Manual on the Duties of a Cavalry Commander in over a century.

Utopian Communities of the Ancient World: Idealistic Experiments of Pythagoras, the Essenes, Pachomius and Proclus
2010 0-7734-3736-3
This is the first comparative study of lived Utopian communities in antiquity. The examined communities provide examples of somewhat successful utopian experiments that belie the twentieth century notion that the application of utopian ideals must always lead to dystopia or not work at all.

Xenophon’s cyropaedia: A Late Byzantine Recension with Facing Page English Translation (two Book Set)
2010 0-7734-3843-2
This edition of Cyropaedia includes the readings preferred in Byzantine times and those discarded to produce a full critical apparatus. The work provides scholars with a new text of the semi-historical life of the founder of the Persian Empire and insight into the methods of scholars from the last great Byzantine renaissance.