Subject Area: Dickinson, Emily

Critical Study of Emily Dickinson's Letters. The Prose of a Poet
1996 0-7734-2270-6


Duty, Body and World in the Works of Emily Dickinson. Reorganizing the Estimate
2000 0-7734-7850-7
This study does not ‘explain away’ the poet according to this or that school of contemporary criticism or psychological bias, but takes her at her own word as a late transcendental poet. Part I deals with the common fallacies of Dickinson studies, the conflict of world views between critic and poet, the substitution of biographical speculation for literary criticism, etc. Part II engages the substance of what she has to say about life and living it. Part III presents a new interpretation of her style and language for a metaphysical point of view.

Emily Dickinson as Philosopher
1981 0-88946-546-0
The first book on Emily Dickinson as philosopher to be published in the USA. Relates the similarities of Dickinson's philosophical themes to those of famous philosophers.

Emily Dickinson's Experiential Poetics and Rev. Dr. Charles Wadsworth’s Rhetoric of Sensation
2007 0-7734-5282-6
This study examines Emily Dickinson’s experiential poetics and her position within and against the changing orthodoxy during the Second Great Awakening, which is best demonstrated by the orthodox sermons of her contemporary, Reverend Dr. Charles Wadsworth. Wadsworth’s published sermons and his “rhetoric of sensation” reflect the characteristics of the changing orthodoxy that arose from the conflict between the liberal Unitarians and the conservative Congregationalists. The tension of knowing and not knowing that existed between these two divergent and convergent faiths created the perfect literary situation in which Dickinson could thrive as a poetic figure. Therefore, this context will shed new light on the study of Dickinson and her work.

Emily Dickinson's Use of Anglo- American Legal Concepts and Vocabulary in Her Poetry Muse at the Bar
1997 0-7734-8639-9
Emily Dickinson's life was bounded and circumscribed by lawyers. Her grandfather, father, brother, and the men who were the first and last loves of her life were all lawyers. The biographical introductions consider these men and their relationship with Dickinson, drawing on letters and published writings. Other chapters discuss "legal" words and terms, Dickinson's knowledge of Anglo-American 19th-century law, her use of legal terms in her poetry, legal definitions and terminology. A secondary appendix includes photocopies of the Harvard Law School catalogue at the time her brother Austin Dickinson attended, 1853-1854.

Influence of Nineteenth- Century British Writers on Emily Dickinson. A Study of Her Library and Letters
2014 0-7734-0071-0
A rare study of the letters and family books of Emily Dickinson from Amherst College and Harvard University libraries revealing Dickinson’s poetic development, through her correspondence and reference to works of British writers and their influence on her work. This work proves her place in the canon of nineteenth-century literature is well-deserved.


Linguistic Transformations in Romantic Aesthetics From Coleridge to Emily Dickinson
2002 0-7734-7029-8


The First Post-Modernist Poets-- Edgar Allan Poe and Emily Dickinson. A New Way of Reading Classic Texts
2017 1-4955-0527-8
Demonstrates how Edgar Allan Poe and Emily Dickinson utilized postmodern literary devices in constructing their poetry and why, therefore, they should be considered the first postmoderns.