Subject Area: Dickens, Charles

Essays on Fiction - Dickens, Melville, Hawthorne, and Faulkner
1999 0-7734-8143-5
These essays deal with the compositional and literary scope of the authors, resulting from the author's personal interest in and teaching.

Explaining the Depiction of Violence Against Women in Victorian Literature. Applying Julia Kristeva’s Theory of Abjection to Dickens, Bronte, and Braddon
2005 0-7734-5989-8
Examines the causes of the abject response in canonical novels such as Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Aurora Floyd and Lady Audley’s Secret. In Powers of Horror, Julia Kristeva outlines her theory of abjection as a simultaneous fascination and horror stemming from sensorial reminders of the subject’s primal, psychological relation to the mother. The author suggests that these psychological perspectives can potentially result in acts of physical violence, which are called “abject response”. By developing Julia Kristeva’s theory of abjection as a model for reading physical acts of violence against women, the book yields specific answers to its overriding questions: Why was a female body so threatening in nineteenth-century fiction? The answer lies in social constructions of women as powers of horror, which the male subject imbibes and which lead to domestic violence if improperly balanced.

Fairy-Tale Literature of Charles Dickens, Christina Rossetti, and George Macdonald. Antidotes to the Victorian Spiritual Crisis
2008 0-7734-5102-1
Despite growing scholarly recognition of subversive social and political content in Victorian fairy tales, their significance in relation to the oft-cited Victorian “spiritual crisis” remains largely unexplored. This interdisciplinary study addresses the critical gap by examining three literary revisions of Sleeping Beauty from the early 1860s as pointed efforts to enter the intensified religious debate following the publication of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of the Species. This book contains two color photographs.

Gender and Madness in the Novels of Charles Dickens
2004 0-7734-6334-8
An attempt to re-read the construction of the mad female characters of Dickens’ novels. A main aim is to demonstrate how social rules and forces differentiate mental derangement gender-wise, as far as its causes and manifestations are concerned, within what could be called, in Dickens’ fiction, a general human tendency toward mental derangement. A further aim is to qualify Dickens’ reputation for misogynistic blindness and prejudice.

Nation as Invisible Protagonist in Dickens and Dostoevsky
2007 0-7734-5478-0
Contributes greatly to the study of two important authors from the 19th century, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Charles Dickens. Acknowledging the radically different national traditions that influenced Dostoevsky’s and Dickens’ novels, such studies failed to make a serious attempt to define this difference or to place it within the proper historical context. The historical significance of “national” is usually overlooked. In the 19th century, reference to “National” is highly charged with special meaning since many nations as we know them now appeared during this period and so nationalism was a major influence both in the political and literary arenas of the time. This study examines the impact of nationalism on the content and form of Dostoevsky’s and Dickens’ novels.