Subject Area: Celtic Studies

Case Study of Ireland and Galicia’s Parallel Paths to Nationhood
2004 0-7734-6237-6
This is an important original study that contributes new knowledge in the field of Celtic Studies as it offers serious consideration to the connections between Ireland and Galicia Dr. White traces the connections between these two Celtic lands through literature, history, mythology and science. White shows that Ireland and Galicia had parallel cultural and national awakenings in the nineteenth century. She demonstrates how these awakenings had roots in the native language movements and how that connection between language and cultural identity eventually led to national identity and political action towards autonomy. Dr. White specifically recounts the role played by elite members such as W.B. Yeats and Vicente Risco and associations such as the Gaelic League and as Irmandades da Fala. White also discusses the role of language as socio-political tool in the works of nineteenth-century national poets, Thomas Moore for Ireland and Rosalía de Castro for Galicia and their twentieth-century counterparts: Seamus Heaney and Celso Emilio Ferreiro. Finally, Dr. White introduces a new term peripheral colonialism to describe Ireland and Galicia’s condition as unofficial colonies of England and Spain respectively.

Celtic Literature of Defeat. An Extraordinary Assortment of Irregularities
1993 0-7734-9332-8
This book attempts to define a genre, called the literature of defeat, in a context made up of its various historical geneses, characteristic style, individual forms, sustaining symbols and motifs, prevailing themes, and relationship to the mainstream. Its existence seems dependent first of all upon the historical circumstance of a military defeat or civil violation of a culture, and the withdrawal of that culture into itself as a way of life, a set of attitudes, a manner of visualizing things. This study also maintains that the literature of defeat is the chief mode of the insular Celts, who never suffered their defeat and occupation by the English gracefully; but carried with them into their secret places their icons and signs and sacraments, all of which shaped their visual art and writings. This book is an account of the writings, past and present, in Wales and Ireland.

Celts and Their Games and Pastimes
2002 0-7734-7171-5
In addition to examining their games and pastimes, this study examines the Celtic psyche and culture. It examines all the Celtic peoples: Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Cornwall, Isle of Man, Brittany, Basque Region, Icelandic Connections; children’s Celtic games; and dance and music. This book fills a gap in the recreation literature of the warrior people known as the Celts and knits together the common threads that exist between the various Celtic nations.

Form and Function of Ritual Dialogue in the Marriage Traditions of Celtic-Language Cultures
2007 0-7734-5328-8
The study examines the form and function of ritual dialogue in marriage traditions, paying particular attention to the betrothal ceremony or rèiteach in Gaelic Scotland, along with analogues in Brittany and Wales, while also exploring the relationship between the ritual dialogues and traditions such as flyting and bardic contest. What emerges is a picture of the multi-referential potential of this form of ritual speech and the symbolic significance which lies behind the surface meaning. The human drama of marriage is seen to be submerged within an all-encompassing symbolic event which adopts as its structure the spirit of conflict, dramatising the give and take of the relationship the community both desires and fears.

Function of the Living Dead in Medieval Norse and Celtic Literature
2007 0-7734-5353-9
This study examines the nature and function of the dead in medieval Norse and Celtic literature. It is demonstrated that agents of the living dead in these literatures have a functional and formulaic role, largely manifested as a process of wish-fulfillment. While the authors of these stories provide resonances of past beliefs regarding the dead, they also appear to have adapted these ideas for their own purposes in order to involve the dead as role-players in their stories. This book contains 11 color photographs.

Galatian Language A Comprehensive Survey of the Language of the Ancient Celts in Greco-Roman Asia Minor
2001 0-7734-7480-3
The Celtic language of Galatian is a unique example of a language which migrated into the heart of the Greco-Roman world during classical times and there survived for centuries. This study collects and analyses for the first time the entire corpus of the Galatian language, using inscriptions, papyri, and references in the classical authors. The study also explores the linguistic viability of Galatian in ancient Asia Minor and the relation of Galatian to the Celtic languages of western Europe.

On the Erudition of the Historical St. Patrick
2000 0-7734-7738-1
This monograph supports and advances the revolutionary views of Celtic scholar David R. Howlett. This work discusses points such as the compositional skill level of the historical St. Patrick and the thematic level of understanding in his use of a pentagonal structure of the Pentateuch, as well as the five collections of the sayings of Jesus in the Gospel of St. Matthew on which he likely modeled the thematic structure of his Confession according to Howlett. This monograph demonstrates that the historical St. Patrick might well be considered not only as a first-rate Biblical theologian but as a wise monastic spiritual director versed in moral and pastoral theology.

Werewolves, Magical Hounds, and Dog-Headed Men in Celtic Literature: A Typological Study of Shape-Shifting
2010 0-7734-3714-2
This book is a typological study of canids and canid imagery in Medieval Celtic cultures. It explores texts ranging from early Irish legal tracts and heroic narrative to exempla from Welsh, Breton, and later Scottish sources.

Women in Celtic Law and Culture
1996 0-7734-8760-3
This study presents a global view on the early Celtic experiment in gender equality, focusing on pre-Roman Celtic groups (Celtiberi, British, Gaulish) as well as the six major Celtic societies which survived into the Middle Ages (Breton, Cornish, Irish, Manx, Scottish, and Welsh). Employing an interdisciplinary approach, it avoids parochialism by cross-referencing, where possible, Pagan, secular Christian, and Christian Church authors. In the cases of conflicts in dates, all sides of the conflicts, and types of evidence from such varied disciplines as archaeology, history, women's studies, anthropology, classical studies, comparative law, economics, linguistics, political science, and psychology are cited.