Subject Area: American Congress & Senate

American Mid-Term Elections of 1922
2007 0-7734-5304-0
This study offers an original account and analysis of the political fortunes of the Harding Administration at its mid-point, and of the public verdict upon the perceived record of the so-called “Do Nothing” Sixty-seventh Congress. This work reveals much about the political culture of the early 1920s, and the extent to which it reflected the many economic, social and cultural changes of the decade. It fills a surprising gap in the political history of the 1920s and paves the way for a proper understanding of the 1924 presidential election in which so many of the issues and personalities resurfaced.

Congressional and Presidential Relations in the United States. Studies in Governmental Gridlock
1991 0-7734-9742-0
A number of distinguished political scientists, historians, and present and former Congressmen address the issue of governmental gridlock from structural and psychological perspectives. Because the issue may be traced to the South's ticket-splitting in the 1950's, it's appropriate to assess this phenomenon of American politics from both national and southern perspectives.

Debate in the U.S. Senate About the War in South Vietnam and Cambodia. Chronicling the Struggle for Power Between the Congress and the Presidency
2008 0-7734-4961-2
Examines how the war in South Vietnam was reflective of a larger battle within the United States between the executive and the legislative branches of government over war-making powers.

Developments in the National Security Policy of the United States Since 9/11. The Separate Roles of the President, the Congress, and the Supreme Court
2008 0-7734-4997-3
An examination of United States National Security Policy, since the events of September 11, 2001, from the perspective of American constitutional law.

Examination of the Budgetary Relationship Between the U.S. Supreme Court and Congress, 1789-2005
2010 0-7734-3832-7
The primary audience of this work will be scholars who study judicial process and behavior at the federal level of government. The data cover in excess of 205 years of American history. No comprehensive work on this subject has ever been published.

Gilbert Hitchcock of Nebraska - Wilson's Floor Leader in the Fight for the Versailles Treaty
1997 0-7734-8476-0


Interest Groups and Lobbying in United States and Comparative Perspectives. Essays in Ethics, Institutional Pluralism, Regulation, and Management
2009 0-7734-4692-3
This collection of original research on interest groups and lobbying around the world offers the most wide-ranging set of scholarly analyses of organized interest behavior available to date. While there is an enormous amount of research already available on groups in the American political process, and a smaller though still sizeable body dealing with interest representation in the other Western democracies, this collection provides scholars with perspectives on an unprecedented range of nations.

Making of Criminal Justice Policy in the United States. Essays on the Role of the President, the Congress, and the Public
2008 0-7734-4963-9
This work analyzes the interplay between the American political system and criminal justice policy, providing a comprehensive examination of the vital role politics plays in defining key elements of the criminal justice system.

Philosophical Reflections on the United States Constitution. A Collection of Bicentennial Essays
1989 0-88946-104-X
A search for the roots of the United States' failures and successes, accenting the American philosophers of the Golden Age - Peirce, Holmes, Dewey - while taking note of classics from Plato to Hegel.

Political Principles of Senator Barry M. Goldwater as Revealed in His Speeches and Writings
2012 0-7734-2587-X
This book presents a selected compilation of Senator Barry M. Goldwater’s speeches and writings from the 1950s to the 1990s. Arranged chronologically, these primary source documents reveal the Senator’s position on deficit spending, defense, politics, foreign policy, Gay Rights, Native Americans, Civil Rights, the news media, natural resources, constitutional rights, freedom, evangelical preachers, and other topics dealing with the making of modern American political principles. With a comprehensive introduction, appendix of related speeches and writings, and list of suggested readings, this volume will be a welcome addition for librarians, historians, political scientists, government officeholders, and other people and groups interested in United States political history during the second half of the twentieth century.

Principles and Practice of Political Compromise. A Case Study of the United States Senate
1984 0-88946-657-2
An empirical and ethical examination of the role of compromise in American politics. Interviews of 34 Senators and 20 staffmembers, as well as with several lobbyists and journalists, provide a rare glimpse into the world of political decision-making. Valuable not only for studying the process of political compromise, but also for its historical account of Congress during the session during which the research took place.

Strategic Calculations and the Admission of New States Into the Union, 1789-1960. Congress and the Politics of Statehood
2008 0-7734-4965-5
Examines the political party and balance of power and policy considerations behind each state’s admission to the Union.

Transition From Congressional Government to Presidential Government in the Late Nineteenth Century. The Key Role of Grover Cleveland in the Process
2012 0-7734-3066-0
The book argues that the imperial presidency began, not with Franklin Delano Roosevelt, but rather with Grover Cleveland. The role of the president was enlarged, and the role of congress diminished during his time in office.

Once the concept of the modern presidency is clearly defined according to its attributes, it becomes clear that it has evolutionary roots that extend to the late 19th century. An examination of Grover Cleveland’s presidencies shows that he laid the foundation for what has become the modern presidency by actions that took place during his two separated terms. He implemented civil service reform and scaled back the number of patronage appointments significantly, took steps towards building a professional bureaucracy. He also regained the independence of the presidency by pressuring Congress to repeal the Tenure of Office Act, and pioneered the form of political leadership that presidents exhibit today.

United States Congress and National Defense, 1915-1939
2008 0-7734-5389-X
This study examines the United States’ rise to the status of world power during the first third of the twentieth century. Through necessity to defend against enemies in two world wars, the United States matured into the most powerful political entity of the era. In defining that course, commentators have frequently credited the military and presidents with this successful advance, while rarely mentioning the importance of Congress. It was Congress, however, which functioned as the initiating body for authorizing and appropriating defense legislation. To reveal Congress’s oft-hidden role, this study incorporates sources that have remained previously unexamined. Public and private documents, records of committee hearings, manuscript collections, and laws are analyzed and brought together to present a more complex portrayal of the time period.