Subject Area: American Civil War

African American Pastor Before and During the American Civil War Volume 4: The Literary Archive of Henry Mc Neal Turner, 1880-1892
2015 1-4955-0352-6
This volume recovers the lost voice within American and African American History of Henry McNeal Turner one of the most prolific writers and speakers during his time. Post-reconstruction in the United States and Turner’s election as bishop in the A.M.E. Church gave him a larger platform to share his views.


How Confederate Women Created New Self-Identities as the Civil War Progressed. The Study of Their Diaries
2008 0-7734-5148-X
This study explores the connection between periodic life writing and the formation of ethnic identity, and argues that the practice of keeping a diary enabled Confederate women to actively maintain and build power structures which privileged “white” Southerners.

Karl Marx’s Letters About Abraham Lincoln and His Strategic Goal in the Civil War: The Destratification of American Society
2015 1-4955-0268-6
Karl Marx did not view Lincoln as fighting to quell a rebellion, but to start a revolution to end worker exploitation by abolishing a stratification system that was not in the workers’ interest. Even Lincoln’s conscription policy during the Civil War was said to support the workers.
The author cites, in full or part, Marx’s various writings (articles and letters, including one Marx wrote to Lincoln and a reply by Ambassador Charles Adams on Lincoln’s behalf) in which Marx analyzes Lincoln’s actions (e.g., his dismissal of McClellan, The Emancipation Proclamation, conscription), as well as Union (northern) elections and discusses military campaigns.


Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 1
2009 0-7734-4717-2
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 2
2009 0-7734-4719-9
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 3
2009 0-7734-4721-0
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 4
2009 0-7734-4723-7
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view.


Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 5
2009 0-7734-4735-0
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 6
2009 0-7734-4725-3
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 7
2009 0-7734-4729-6
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 8
2009 0-7734-4731-8
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 9
2009 0-7734-4733-4
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view.

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume10
2009 0-7734-4737-7
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Power Politics, Diplomacy, and the Avoidance of Hostilities Between England and the United States in Wake of the Civil War
1998 0-7734-8398-5


Role of Southern Free Blacks During the Civil War Era: The Life of Free African Americans in Richmond, Virginia 1850-1876
2015 1-4955-0278-3
This book will appeal to a broad audience of professional historians, undergraduates, and local historians interested in African America, Civil War, Antebellum, and Reconstruction History. It examines the impact of the Civil War on free blacks in and around Richmond, VA., by drawing on private, public, court, church, military, and government documents thus offering a unique perspective on the lives of both urban and rural free blacks.

The argument is that free blacks adapted to the reality of living in a slave society by developing communities and alliances in the antebellum years that served to protect and advance their interests. These communities and alliances were predicated on a number of variables including a person’s professional skills, family connections, criminal record, and place of residence. While free blacks were ostensibly pushed toward slave status and membership in a monolithic black community, the reality was that in the Richmond area, internal divisions among blacks, combined with the benefits that came from benevolent despotism granted to individual blacks, made it preferable for free blacks to form networks of alliances based on shared interests rather than unite as one community.

The Civil War rendered these social groups obsolete forcing former antebellum free blacks and slaves to adapt to new conditions. While some free blacks sought to maintain prewar communal relationships based on class, most free blacks recognized the importance of political and community unity as necessary in order to respond effectively to the horrors of Reconstruction.



Southern Evangelists and the Coming of the Civil War
2001 0-7734-7658-X
This book examines the connection between evangelical religious beliefs and antebellum southern culture. Evangelical assumptions and ideas seemed not only to justify slavery and patriarchy, but these assumptions made comprehensible life’s mysteries and heartaches. Southerners thus had a moral, as well as a material, investment in their culture. As they came to believe that the Republican Party threatened that investment, the religiously-minded southerners could accept and support secession. This moral ardor underlay much southern martial ardor during the Civil War. Rather than treat religion as purely a set of formal rituals or as membership in a church, this work treats the religious assumptions, rituals and symbols as a part of culture.

Tracing the Civil War Veteran Pension System in the State of Virginia. Entitlement or Privilege
1999 0-7734-8198-2
This study traces the history of the Confederate veteran pension system in Virginia, tracing all relevant state laws that had an impact on Confederate servicemen and their families. Another of the main goals was the development of information on all Confederate veterans and their widows who have received Virginia pension payments. This study will interest state regimental historians, American historians, policy-analysts examining state benefit programs, genealogists, individuals interested in the Civil War, librarians and archivists seeking access to the original veteran pension applications in the Virginia State Library's Archival Department in Richmond, state and Federal-level decision–makers examining the strengths and weaknesses of state-designed, -administered, and –implemented social programs, those interested in the policy process, and researchers interested in the destiny of the military loser. Includes photographs.

U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 1.
2002 0-7734-7121-9


U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 2. U. S. Rifles-Muskets of the Civil War.
2002 0-7734-7117-0


U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 3. Arms Imported From Europe During the American Civil War, 1861-1865.
2002 0-7734-7119-7


U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 4. U. S. Civil War Carbines.
2002 0-7734-7111-1