Subject Area: American Civil War

An African American Pastor Before and During the American Civil War Volume 4: The Literary Archive of Henry Mc Neal Turner, 1880-1892
2015 1-4955-0352-6
This volume recovers the lost voice within American and African American History of Henry McNeal Turner one of the most prolific writers and speakers during his time. Post-reconstruction in the United States and Turner’s election as bishop in the A.M.E. Church gave him a larger platform to share his views.


British American Loyalists in Canada and U.S. Southern Confederates in Brazil. Exiles From the United States
1993 0-7734-9384-0
The first sociological study (using social anthropology techniques) of the descendants of British American Loyalists in Canada (Fredericton, Montreal, Toronto, et al.), and of the Southern Confederates in their capital Americana in Brazil. It examines the way political exiles who left their country (persuaded that their political causes were lost) decided to concentrate their efforts in the host countries on the survival of their cultures only. It documents the techniques through which the two groups (original exiles and their descendants) achieved that cultural survival and prominent places in their host-countries.

Civil War Letters (1862-1865) of Private Henry Kauffman
1991 0-7734-9684-X
These letters will be of interest to any Civil War enthusiast. Though registered as "Blacksmith" in the Company Descriptive Book of the 110th Reg't of the Ohio Infantry, Kaufmann insisted upon serving as a front-line infantryman throughout the war. His unit was involved in some of the more intense fighting in the war, particularly in the Shenandoah Valley. He was captured by the Confederates at one point and "paroled'. He deserted, was apprehended, and returned to duty. Later he was wounded and finally mustered out of a military hospital. The book also contains maps and photographs.

Civil War Letters of Joseph K. Taylor of the 37th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry
1998 0-7734-8449-3
These letters, written mostly to Taylor's father, illustrate many specific attitudes of Union soldiers. They reflect army morale, attitudes toward stay-at-homes, "copperheads" and commanding generals. They add new texture to the burgeoning social history of the American Civil War. Well educated and quite literate, Taylor gives expression to the values of many soldiers, defining 19th-century ideas of manhood, duty, courage and community, and confirm some themes in the new scholarship while contradicting others. Taylor volunteered in August, 1862 and served in the Army of the Potomac until August, 1864, when he died of wounds sustained in a skirmish near Charlestown, WV. He left the sophomore class at Amherst College to enlist, was promoted to sergeant in the 37th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, which participated at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and the 1864 Shenendoah Valley campaign.

Civil War Professional Soldiers, Citizen Soldiers, and Native American Soldiers of Genesee County, New York
2006 0-7734-5718-6
There are probably more books published on the Civil War than any other event in American history. Many volumes focus on the heroic efforts of a single individual or a single unit. The authors portray the individual or unit in Homeric prose as they explain how these extraordinary men preserved the Republic. The truth is, however, that over 2,100,000 ordinary individuals in thousands of ordinary regiments from hundreds of ordinary counties accomplished the extraordinary task of preserving the United States and liberating millions of enslaved persons. This work captures the trials, tribulations and triumphs of these ordinary soldiers by examining the role played by the citizen-soldiers of Genesee County, New York. The citizen-soldiers from Genesee County were ordinary individuals. They were farmers, mechanics, merchants and workers who were moved by their civic responsibility and faithfully performed their duty. This is the first work that examines the contribution of soldiers of Genesee County to the preservation of the union. The work examines the roles played by two Genesee County residents (Emory Upton and Ely Parker) along with three regiments with large contingents of Genesee County residents (12th NY Infantry, 15th NY Cavalry and 8th NY Heavy Artillery) in the Civil War. The well being and security of any republic depends on the commitment of its citizen-soldiers to both cause and comrade. The men of Genesee County exemplified this commitment.

History of the 134th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the American Civil War
1997 0-7734-8551-1
The NYSV was one of the few regiments to serve in both the eastern and western theatres of the war. It also had the misfortune to be, for a good deal of its tenure, attached to the ill-fated Eleventh Corps. Highlights of the regiment's service were its near-annihilation at Gettysburg; action around Chattanooga; the brutal march to and from Knoxville; its almost daily action during the Atlanta Campaign, followed by the March to the Sea; and the Campaign of the Carolinas. It contains excerpts from primary source documents, including diaries, memoirs, letters, local newspapers, Company order books, and medical records from the National Archives never before researched, capsule biographies of all 1100 who served, maps and statistical data, and photographs.

History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Colored Infantry in the Civil War. The Real Story Behind the Movie Glory
2012 0-7734-2629-9
Junne describes the history behind the African Americans who fought in the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of the Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. His contention is that there are very few resources for scholars and laypeople to fully understand the impact that African-Americans had on American military history, and that this book will fill in that gap. In documenting a historiography of black oppression prior to the Civil War, Junne shows why African-Americans have been left out of the discussion, and then argues why they must be included to understand the war’s entire story. His claim, and it is provocatively argued, is that African-American soldiers played such an important role in the Union Army that the outcome of the war would have been tipped in favor of the Confederacy had they been forbidden from fighting. What is lost in contemporary discussion of the war is that this was a hotly debated question at the time, with Lincoln deciding in favor of letting them fight which secured thousands of men (and their wives who cooked and did laundry for soldiers) which had an immeasurable impact on the war, and forever changed the future of America.

How Confederate Women Created New Self-Identities as the Civil War Progressed. The Study of Their Diaries
2008 0-7734-5148-X
This study explores the connection between periodic life writing and the formation of ethnic identity, and argues that the practice of keeping a diary enabled Confederate women to actively maintain and build power structures which privileged “white” Southerners.

Immigration in the American South 1864-1895
2006 0-7734-5725-9
After the Civil War, the southern states experienced a decline in the labor force, particularly those needed to work the fields. Consequently, the South gathered together to recruit immigrants, both foreign as well as domestic. This book examines these efforts, focusing on major southern immigration conventions and their objectives and accomplishments.

During the last years of the 1860s, the individual southern states were occupied publishing descriptive handbooks expounding the reasons to relocate to their state. In 1876, 14 states gathered at a convention in New Orleans to address the issue of immigration. In 1883, the Southern Immigration Association of America was formed under the leadership of A.J. McWhirter. The following year, this organization held a three-day convention in Nashville. In 1888, the Southern Interstate Immigration Association held the first of at least three conventions in the town of Montgomery, followed in 1890 at Asheville and again in 1894 at Augusta.

Included in this book are proceedings of the Southern Immigration Association Convention and the first convention of the Southern Interstate Immigration Association. Newspaper coverage of these major conventions and other smaller conventions is included. As the southern railroads played a major part in immigration efforts, this book also includes information on their role and activities in encouraging immigrants to relocate to southern states. In the concluding chapter, state-by-state charts analyze the state population statistics from 1870 to 1900.

Karl Marx’s Letters About Abraham Lincoln and His Strategic Goal in the Civil War: The Destratification of American Society
2015 1-4955-0268-6
Karl Marx did not view Lincoln as fighting to quell a rebellion, but to start a revolution to end worker exploitation by abolishing a stratification system that was not in the workers’ interest. Even Lincoln’s conscription policy during the Civil War was said to support the workers.
The author cites, in full or part, Marx’s various writings (articles and letters, including one Marx wrote to Lincoln and a reply by Ambassador Charles Adams on Lincoln’s behalf) in which Marx analyzes Lincoln’s actions (e.g., his dismissal of McClellan, The Emancipation Proclamation, conscription), as well as Union (northern) elections and discusses military campaigns.


Memoirs of Thaddeus S.C. Lowe, Chief of the Aeronautic Corps of the Army of the United States During the Civil War
2004 0-7734-6522-7
Although Thaddeus Lowe is a known figure to some historians, his scientific contributions such as the portable gas generators that filled his balloons and the compression ice machine that introduced “artificial” ice to the world, remain largely hidden. Ironically, it is very possible to find literature that references his work and his Civil War experiences, yet it is nearly impossible to read the book that this related literature is based upon – Lowe’s autobiography. This book has been painstakingly prepared from one of the only known copies of Lowe’s difficult-to-decipher text. This amplified autobiography includes photographs of the inventor and his balloons as well as photos of artifacts such as correspondences (including a handwritten note from President Lincoln) and receipts. It also contains relevant maps and supplementary information to enhance understanding of Lowe’s journeys and the battles he participated in.

Photographic History of the Civil War
2009 0-7734-5585-X
The Civil War photographs by Mathew Brady hold a canonical place in American history. This complete collection was published in 1912. It has been unavailable for nearly 100 years.

An extremely valuable resource for students and scholars.

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 1
2009 0-7734-4717-2
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 2
2009 0-7734-4719-9
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 3
2009 0-7734-4721-0
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 4
2009 0-7734-4723-7
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view.


Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 5
2009 0-7734-4735-0
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 6
2009 0-7734-4725-3
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 7
2009 0-7734-4729-6
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 8
2009 0-7734-4731-8
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume 9
2009 0-7734-4733-4
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view.

Photographic History of the Civil War: Volume10
2009 0-7734-4737-7
Today Americans remember their Civil War in a romantic way. The battle heroes have been glamorized and the political leaders have been mythologized. But the truth is that the Civil War wreaked more death and destruction than any previous war.

The Civil War was the first industrialized war. The destruction to cities, homes, and roads was enormous. The numbers of dead exceeded anything known before. But after the war was over, the cities were rebuilt, the dead were buried, and these horrors of war were hidden from our view

Power Politics, Diplomacy, and the Avoidance of Hostilities Between England and the United States in Wake of the Civil War
1998 0-7734-8398-5
Using archival sources, this study documents the delicate diplomatic negotiations between England and the United States during a period of great of tensions and threat of war.

Relief and Recovery in Post Civil War South Carolina. A Death by Inches
1997 0-7734-8437-X
In this study of relief and recovery efforts in South Carolina after the Civil War, the emphasis is on people, and in particular on those people who seem to be excluded from, or barely mentioned in, the conventional studies of the era. By delving deep into the primary source material of the period, this study allows readers to discover an expanded past, one that for the most part has remained as 'hidden history.'

Role of Southern Free Blacks During the Civil War Era: The Life of Free African Americans in Richmond, Virginia 1850-1876
2015 1-4955-0278-3
This book will appeal to a broad audience of professional historians, undergraduates, and local historians interested in African America, Civil War, Antebellum, and Reconstruction History. It examines the impact of the Civil War on free blacks in and around Richmond, VA., by drawing on private, public, court, church, military, and government documents thus offering a unique perspective on the lives of both urban and rural free blacks.

The argument is that free blacks adapted to the reality of living in a slave society by developing communities and alliances in the antebellum years that served to protect and advance their interests. These communities and alliances were predicated on a number of variables including a person’s professional skills, family connections, criminal record, and place of residence. While free blacks were ostensibly pushed toward slave status and membership in a monolithic black community, the reality was that in the Richmond area, internal divisions among blacks, combined with the benefits that came from benevolent despotism granted to individual blacks, made it preferable for free blacks to form networks of alliances based on shared interests rather than unite as one community.

The Civil War rendered these social groups obsolete forcing former antebellum free blacks and slaves to adapt to new conditions. While some free blacks sought to maintain prewar communal relationships based on class, most free blacks recognized the importance of political and community unity as necessary in order to respond effectively to the horrors of Reconstruction.



Southern Evangelists and the Coming of the Civil War
2001 0-7734-7658-X
This book examines the connection between evangelical religious beliefs and antebellum southern culture. Evangelical assumptions and ideas seemed not only to justify slavery and patriarchy, but these assumptions made comprehensible life’s mysteries and heartaches. Southerners thus had a moral, as well as a material, investment in their culture. As they came to believe that the Republican Party threatened that investment, the religiously-minded southerners could accept and support secession. This moral ardor underlay much southern martial ardor during the Civil War. Rather than treat religion as purely a set of formal rituals or as membership in a church, this work treats the religious assumptions, rituals and symbols as a part of culture.

Story of Joshua D. Breyfogle, Private, 4th Ohio Infantry (10th Ohio Cavalry) and the Civil War
2001 0-7734-7497-8
At the age of 54, Joshua Breyfogle, a tailor from a small town in Central Ohio, left his wife and six children and enlisted in the Union army, serving for four years as a soldier in infantry and cavalry units in both the Eastern and Western theaters of the conflict. These letters and account books are gems in terms of detailed and descriptive accounts of what was happening to him and to his sons all through the War, providing an excellent source for a social history of the United States in the 19th century, as well as shedding new light on the Civil War soldier as an individual.

Student's View of the College of St. James on the Eve of the Civil War. The Letters of W. Wilkins Davis (1842-1866)
1988 0-88946-674-2
A series of sixteen letters that tell the story of a religiously oriented boarding school founded in 1842 as an educational institution that differed somewhat from the usual academy in that it would function as "a church family, a Christian home" in which the rector would serve as father to the whole community.

Tracing the Civil War Veteran Pension System in the State of Virginia. Entitlement or Privilege
1999 0-7734-8198-2
This study traces the history of the Confederate veteran pension system in Virginia, tracing all relevant state laws that had an impact on Confederate servicemen and their families. Another of the main goals was the development of information on all Confederate veterans and their widows who have received Virginia pension payments. This study will interest state regimental historians, American historians, policy-analysts examining state benefit programs, genealogists, individuals interested in the Civil War, librarians and archivists seeking access to the original veteran pension applications in the Virginia State Library's Archival Department in Richmond, state and Federal-level decision–makers examining the strengths and weaknesses of state-designed, -administered, and –implemented social programs, those interested in the policy process, and researchers interested in the destiny of the military loser. Includes photographs.

U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 1.
2002 0-7734-7121-9


U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 2. U. S. Rifles-Muskets of the Civil War.
2002 0-7734-7117-0


U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 3. Arms Imported From Europe During the American Civil War, 1861-1865.
2002 0-7734-7119-7


U.S. and Confederate Arms and Armories During the American Civil War. Vol. 4. U. S. Civil War Carbines.
2002 0-7734-7111-1