Subject Area: Algeria

Algerian Guerrilla Campaign Strategy and Tactics
1997 0-7734-2292-7
This study uses extensive primary source material to explore new concepts in understanding the Algerian guerrilla campaign. Besides the history of traditional and modern querrilla in world context, detailed statistical analysis of FLN campaigns derived from French newspaper reports of incidents is also used. Chapter topics include: Experiences of Guerrilla Warfare and the Gap between Systematic Theory and Reality (includes analysis of guerrilla warfare in China, Cuba, Vietnam, et al); Traditional Algerian Guerrilla Resistance from 1830-1908; the Genesis of Algerian Nationalism; the FLN - Military Zones, the Summam Conference, the FLN-Urban Guerrilla Network; French Counter-Guerilla Policy and Practice; the Impact of Jihad on Warfare.

Concise History of Political Violence in Algeria 1954-2000
2002 0-7734-7047-6


Concise History of Political Violence in Algeria 1954-2000
2002 0-7734-7049-2


French and Algerian Identities From Colonial Times to the Present a Century of Interaction
1993 0-7734-9233-X
These essays, by a range of British, French, and Algerian scholars, concentrate specifically on the distinctive cultural identities which have been created in each country due to interaction. General chapters offer methodological overviews and place the problematic within its historical context. Part One deals with the colonial period up to 1954, Part Two with the War of Independence, and Part Three with the post-colonial period since 1962. In each case, the shifting identities are explored from a variety of disciplinary perspectives.

History of the Algerian Banking Industry 1830-2010
2014 0-7734-0047-8
This important in-depth analysis of the institutional framework of the Algerian banking industry from 1830 to 2010 is a must read for academics, policy makers and individuals interested in the economics of emerging countries and specifically Algeria. It charts the banking evolution and development during Algeria’s post-independence and socialist periods; its relationship to global monetary policy; its free market transformation and its de facto inefficiency. The book also provides insight into the banking change agents from a political cultural perspective and suggests important reforms that would stabilize the Algerian banking industry in the future.

Political and Economic Thought and Practice in Nineteenth-Century France and the Colonization of Algeria
2002 0-7734-7296-7


Politics and Aesthetics of Kateb Yacine from Francophone Literature to Popular Theatre in Algeria and Outside
1999 0-7734-7871-X
This book analyses Kateb Yacine’s writing throughout his career. It illustrates Yacine’s intellectual journal from the literary novel through the conventional forms of drama to the creation of the authentic, popular style of performance that he took to the people. His quest for identity became comprehensible in Nedjma and was constantly being renewed and reborn throughout his works in a way that reflected the changing social conditions of Algeria as it gained independence and sought to establish itself as a nation state. The contrast between pre- and post- Independence Algeria runs through the whole book and helps the reader gain new insight into the consistency and evolution of Kateb Yacine’s work.

Politics, Language and Gender in the Algerian Arabic Novel
2002 0-7734-7124-3
This book examines the development of the Arabic novel in post-independence Algeria. It focuses on novels by Abdelhamid Benhadouga, al-Tahar Wattar and Rachid Boudjedra during the period 1972-1988, considering the possibilities for critical expression in the state which emerged from colonial rule and anti-colonial struggle. It investigates the authors’ attempts to negotiate the constraints arising from authoritarian rule and restrictive ideologies of language and gender. This is the first extended study of Algeria’s post-independence Arabic literature in a European language. It provides an alternative view which helps to contextualize and extend the study of French-language literature from North Africa, and also contributes to the field of Arabic literary studies by extending its focus beyond the eastern part of the Arab world. It is given added significance because the issue of language has been of critical importance within the current conflict in Algeria. It examines the situation of language under colonial rule, its place within the nationalist ideology, and the manipulation of language policy by a state seeking legitimacy. Its detailed examination of the arena of culture and identity contributes to an understanding of the conflict in Algeria and the legacy of colonial rule.

Politics, Poetics and the Algerian Novel
1999 0-7734-7957-0
This book examines the development of the Francophone Algerian novel, the circumstances of its emergence, and the various phases of its progress through the pre-independence period, and the extent to which this parallels the political evolution of Algerian nationalism exemplified in the nationalist leader Ferhat Abbas. In focuses on the major themes discussed in the novels, and surveys the criticism of both French and Algerian intelligentsia. The conclusion examines the post-independence literary movement.

Study of Land and Milieu in the Works of Algerian-Born Writers Albert Camus, Mouloud Feraoun, and Mohammed Dib
2005 0-7734-6296-1
The Generation of ‘52 in Algeria produced three writers: Albert Camus, Mouloud Feraoun and Mohammed Dib, who represent three remarkably different perspectives on the Algerian land and milieu. Although Algeria is the birthplace of all three, what emerges from a close study of their depictions of the land and milieu is an understanding of their differing writing identities.

In Noces and L’Eté, Camus excels at presenting the varied, often harsh lessons he has learned from the Algerian land: lessons of contrasts in the Algerian geography between sterile desert and fertile sea coast, between the blistering sun of midday and the cool peace of the evening, between Kabylian poverty and the rich beauty of the land. Yet, because of his status as a French pied-noir i.e. a person whose patrie is France but whose homeland is Algeria, he seeks to maintain an equilibrium between opposing dualities. Ultimately, Camus reveals a picture of a land in which he alone occupies the pivotal position. Thus, landscape can be understood to mirror and produce ontology.

Mouloud Feraoun, a French educated Arab-Algerian, writes from a need to present his native Algeria to French readers. His zeal to project an acceptable image to a French audience leaves no space for his own Algerianness in his text and consequently fails convincingly to present his own identity. Thus, his depiction of the land appears alienated from his identity as an Algerian writer.

Mohammed Dib grounds his narrative in an unmediated portrait of his watan-- the Arabic equivalent to patrie. No apology or explanation for his “difference” is offered to his French readers. His unquestioning approach to Algeria effects a reconciliation of the inner and outer landscapes that comprise his identity. Dib’s characters have an autochthonous quality mirroring and confirming the author’s own deep roots as an Arab and an Algerian.

In this continuum from the pied-noir’s vision of his landscape to the Arab-Algerian’s concept of watan, there is discerned a meaningful connection between land and identity.

The author’s reading of the position each author appropriated for himself in the land of his birth in the chosen Algerian pre-independence narratives, attempts to link the three sides of the Algerian trilogy of land, self, and writing. For the Franco-Algerian writers, such an understanding is an important step in knowing the associations that brought divergent reactions to the same land by its colonizers and its colonized. Though time and space specific to the Algeria of 1950s, it furthers an appreciation of present-day reactions and counter reactions that may arise because of the dynamics of self and place. And, also of more importance, the present day (sometimes explosive) issues of self, culture and land in a rapidly changing multicultural climate of our world today.