Writing and Reform in Sixteenth-Century England. Interdisciplinary Essays

Author: Blakeley, John and Mike Pincombe
Year:2008
Pages:264
ISBN:0-7734-4834-9
978-0-7734-4834-6
Price:199.95
Volume brings together nine essays developed from papers given at the Tudor Symposium Conference of 2002, held at the University of Newcastle. In broad terms all are concerned with the relationship between literature and the religious upheavals of the Tudor period. The collection includes an exploration of the iconographic representation of suffering in Foxe’s Acts and Monuments. This book contains three black and white photographs.

Reviews

“It is a great strength of the volume that it considers not only how the values of the Reformation shaped literary practice but also how literature shaped the expression and understanding of religious beliefs. . . . The volume succeeds in illuminating the richness of the genres in which the experience of the Reformation was portrayed. . . . succeeds in renewing our attention to the scope of Reformation writing in the period and it is extremely valuable in extending our attention beyond the ‘high’ literature of the 1590s.” - Prof. Dermot Cavanaugh, University of Edinburgh

“This volume shows how protestant ideas affected an extraordinary variety of modes and discourses, shaping and challenging the ways in which imaginative and polemical writing should be conducted. It engages with a range of neglected and non-canonical writing from across the Elizabethan period that should feature far more prominently in our understanding of the period. It is also refreshing to see a volume that includes so many contributors from across Europe and one that balances well-established voices with newer ones.”- Prof. Jennifer Richards, Newcastle University

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Foreword by Dr. Tom Betteridge
1. Supplementing the Word: Spiritual Endurance and Bodily Suffering in Foxe’s Acts and MonumentsDr. Rufus Wood
2. Confounding Purgatory in Elysium: Allegories of the Afterworld in Sir Thomas Smith’s De recta et emendate linguae Anglicae scriptione (1568) – Dr. Mike Pincombe
3. ‘Unclean Spirits Like Frogs’: Polemical Protestant Dialogues and the Campion Affair – Dr. Antoinina Bevan Zlatar
4. Style and Religious Reform in late Sixteenth-Century England – Dr. Jon D. Orten
5. Stammering, Snoring and Other Problems in the Early Modern English Dialogue – Dr. Cathy Shrank
6. Richard Mulcaster’s Politicized Defense of Traditional Spelling – Dr. Maria O’Neill
7. “Dance the Wild Morris in a Needle’s Eye”: Form and the Ovidian Feminine in Tudor Love Poetry – Dr. Amina Alyal
8. ‘This Realm I Have to Strangers Subject Made’: Mary Sidney’s The Tragedie of Antonie as a Catalyst of Political and Cultural Reform – Dr. Marguérite Corporaal
9. Profiting from Prodigality: Robert Greene’s Repentance and the Material Condition of the Professional Writer – Dr. John Blakeley
Endword
Bibliography
Index