William Penn, James Madison and the Historical Crisis in American Federalism

Author: Durland, William
Year:2000
Pages:308
ISBN:0-7734-7698-9
978-0-7734-7698-1
Price:219.95
This study alerts American citizens to the danger of the demise of American government, as it was conceived by the founders and framers. The books traces the rise of the American nation and its unique governmental creation – a delicate balance of republicanism, democracy, federalism and constitutionalism. It examines William Penn’s attempt to establish a “Holy Experiment” an utopian yet practical government, and then the new constititution which James Madison called the “American Experiment”. The book follows the daily steps of the deliberations and conversations of the participants in the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The study culminates in an examination of the third attempt at confederacy in American and new efforts to replace national government with a controlling global economy.

Reviews

“The book is both religious history and legal/constitutional history, and it is political history as well. . . the text is not only complicated and scholarly, it also calls on the reader to make a choice. Should I get involved in public life or should I remain aloof and removed from it? . . . .This book is disturbing because it challenges the reader to think about tough issues and to act on one’s beliefs.” – from the Preface by Dr. William Bruening

Table of Contents

Table of contents:
Preface by William Bruening
1. The American Experiment
2. The Holy Experiment
3. The Iroquois Confederacy and American Congresses
4. The First American Confederacy
5. Convening the Constitutional Convention
6. Completing the Constitutional Convention
7. Federalism Survives American History
8. The Rise of the Third American Confederacy
9. Devolution from Within and Without America
10. The 21st Century Crisis in American Federalism
Appendices: William Penn’s Pennsylvania Frame of Government (1682); the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union of the United States of America (1781); Delegates Who Attended the Constitutional Convention of 1787; The Virginia Plan (1787); The New Jersey Plan (1787); the Constitution of the United States (1787)
Bibliography; Notes; Index