Why Do People Run?: Competitive Sport, Daily Exercise, or Community Event

Author: Evans, Catherine
Year:2010
Pages:124
ISBN:0-7734-1431-2
978-0-7734-1431-0
Price:139.95

Nominated for the 2012 Society of Midland Authors Award
This work examines the evolution of road racing in America from elite marathons to charity races for the masses. It also analyzes the role of advertising and marketing in this transformation.

Reviews

“…a fantastic tale of high-level paradoxical dilemmas in the running world as a sport, and technological ‘window’ on the competitive world.” -Professor Gary I. Wade, Drake University

“…approaches the culture of running in America… informative and entertaining…”- Dr. Traci A. Statler, California State University, Fullerton

“Evans has compiled an engaging, accessible resource for this audience, no doubt appealing to a wide variety of readers, whether they are intrigued by running specifically, or by popular culture or marketing more...” -Dr. McHee Hyun, Antioch University

Table of Contents

Foreword by Gary I. Wade
Acknowledgements
Introduction 1
American running culture is understandable through the eyes of many beholders. Catherine Evans
Chapter 1
The truth and fallacy associated with the history of the first Marathon.
Carolyn J. Evans
Chapter 2
Road races as experiential marketing for an unexpected brand.
Sandra L.M. Henry
Chapter 3
Philanthropy runners race for funds and awareness.
Catherine Evans
Chapter 4
Motivation and intentions of marathon runners have evolved over time.
Carolyn Evans, Catherine Evans, and Alyssa Frakes
Chapter 5
Disability and medical developments challenge the morals and ethics of running culture.
Amy Heger, Catherine Evans, & Jenna DeLong
Chapter 6
Paradoxical sponsorship associated with marathons as a popular race form, charitable fundraiser, and lucrative investment.
Brinjal Patel
Bibliography