What Newspapers, Films, and Television Do Africans Living in Britain See and Read? The Media of the African Diaspora

Author: Ogunyemi, Ola
Year:2012
Pages:352
ISBN:0-7734-2920-4
978-0-7734-2920-8
Price:239.95
Sociologists can learn a lot from studying a group’s media consumption patterns. In this study, Ogunyemi researches what stories are most resonant with Black Africans living in England. The book tries to discover whether or not this minority group adopts normative approaches to media coverage, by not only consuming but participating in media. It also discusses the omission of African stories by the mainstream media in England. This book will contribute to understanding ethnic media trends.

Reviews

“The ambition of the book is as laudable as it is necessary. It aims to provide a welcome antidote to Anglo-American and nationally based studies of media production and consumption. There is a distinct lack of work which attempts to interrogate the mainstream from the perspective of the outsiders.”

-Prof. Martin Conboy,
University of Sheffield


“Ogunyemi’s study is not only useful to students and scholars of diasporas. Journalism Studies has much to learn from this book. For too long journalism practice has been focused on models from the West; we see here there is much to learn from African experiences.”

-Prof. Chris Atton,
Edinburgh Napier University

“The economic, political, and social significance of the African diaspora has increased in recent years as recognized by national and global politicians and policy-making organizations like the Bretton Woods institutions (the World Bank and IMF). This book will be useful for Africanist scholars in media and communication as well as area studies – but academics with a global focus could be enriched by this book.”

-Prof. Okoth Fred Mudhai,
Coventry University

Table of Contents

Foreword by Professor Martin Conboy

Chapter 1: Introduction: Theorizing the Media of African Diasporas

Chapter 2: Organization and Production Practices

Chapter 3: Content: Professional Values, Orientation and Connective Functions

Chapter 4: Audiences: Media Habits and Migratory Experiences

Chapter 5: Internet Habits, Representation and Participation

Conclusion: Future: What does the future hold for media of African Diasporas?

Bibliography
Index