Use of Instructional Technology in Dealing with Disasters: How Universities Used It During Hurricane Katrina

Author: McClue, Brucetta; Ashraf Esmail and Mary Friend Shepard
Year:2009
Pages:152
ISBN:0-7734-3887-4
978-0-7734-3887-3
Price:139.95
This qualitative multiple case study examines the problems of six colleges on the Gulf Coast of the United States that physically closed for an extended period following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The study determines how communication was maintained with employees and students, and how instruction was continued. Findings revealed that IT staff had not been included in the highest-level disaster-preparedness planning, which hampered the institution’s ability to maintain contact and delivery of instruction.

Reviews

“As the authors state, higher education planners must now view instruction and communication, “in the context of what might happen in a worst-case scenario.” That is what they provide in this highly important and eminently relevantresource for today’s higher education administrators and, in fact, any educator who wants to plan for an uncertain future.” – Prof. Paula Dawidowicz, Walden University

“. . . an important piece of literature that can be utilized in preparing higher education institutions as well as K-12 schools a tool for how to maintain operation if a natural disaster at the level of Hurricane Katrina were to hit again. The information shared by the IT leaders provided valuable information in helping learning communities the ability bounce back very quickly structurally if a natural disaster would occur again and still be effective.” – Prof. Camacia Smith-Ross, Dillard University

“. . . recognizes the importance of IT leaders as they prepare an effective platform for online instruction in this global environment and the need to prepare faculty and teachers to teach in this platform in the event of a future disaster.” – Prof. Anna Lamikanra, Thomas Edison State College

Table of Contents

Foreword by Prof. Paula Dawidowicz, Walden University
Preface
Acknowledgments
1. Introduction to the Study Introduction
IT Crisis Preparedness in Higher Education
Online Distance Education Delivery
Problem Statement
Nature of the Study
Research Questions
Purpose of the Study
Theoretical Framework
Operational Definitions
Assumptions
Limitations
Scope
Delimitations
Significance of the Study
Summary
2. Literature Review
Introduction
The IT Leadership Role
IT Restructuring
Disasters and Higher Education Preparedness
Online and Distance Education Delivery
Theoretical Framework
Restructuring Approaches
Multiple Case Study Theory Methodology
Summary
3. Methodology
Introduction
Research and Interview Questions
Qualitative Design
The Role of the Researcher
Protection of Participants’ Rights
Participants
Data-Collection Process Recording Responses to the Questions Concluding the Interviews
Data Analysis and Data-Coding Procedures
4. Findings
Introduction
Data Gathering
Transcriptions
Methods of Tracking Data
Discrepant or Nonconforming Data
Patterns and Repetitions of Relationships of IT Issues
Analysis of Data: Illustration Models
Regain Student Population
Communication
Individual Support
Timeline
Scheduling Faculty Training
Resistance to Change
Directives: Local and State
Institutional Culture
Dissemination of Information
Course Design and Development
Infrastructure Implications: IT Immediate Issues Following a Disaster
Short-Term and Long-Term Planning
Mental Modeling
Personal Mastery Actual Change

Training
Remote Site
Networking with Other Institutions
Transition
Shared Vision
Systems Thinking
Teams
Anxiety of the Institutional Environment at the Time
Leader to Contact Staff Management
Communication
Time to Implement Change
Internet Access
Support
Summary
5. Conclusions and Recommendations
Overview
Interpretation of Findings
Implications for Social Change
Recommendations for Action
Recommendations for Further Study
Reflection
Conclusion
References
Index