Translation Theory and Practice Reassembling the Tower

Author: Will, Frederic
Year:1993
Pages:216
ISBN:0-7734-9234-8
978-0-7734-9234-9
Price:179.95
Essays on translation, not as a brainless, sterile theory, but as a conversation of the mind itself. The topic of this inner talk is power and beauty in different languages, the return of that power onto the translator's self, and the philosophical import of that circuit of energies. Interleafed with actual translations are essays on the nature and yield of translating: Translation and Criticism; reworked parts of three issues of Micromegas -- American Indian, Mexican Indian, and Manx; Untranslatability; Translating the Conceptual; and more.

Reviews

"Fred Will has been translating since the early fifties, writing about translation since the early seventies -- and he packs the fruit of both labors into the brilliant jumble of boxes that comprise this book. . . . he gives us three rambling passages from Micromegas exploring the practical and theoretical problems of translating into English from Manx and various American and Mexican Indian languages. At the same time he runs us through complex philosophical ruminations that constantly push at the boundaries of normative thinking about translation without ever slipping out of his own brand of translation morality -- "good" translation in the deepest and broadest sense of the word. Throughout these personal, poetic, and philosophical meanderings runs Will's restless intelligence and sensitivity along with an enormous willingness to take stylistic and emotional risks. . . . a deeply felt and thoroughly thought-out amateurism, which often beats the pros at their own game because it draws on such deep wells of experience and personal integrity." -- Philosophy and Literature