Third World Health Promotion and Its Dependence on First World Wealth

Author: MacDonald, Théodore
Year:2001
Pages:364
ISBN:0-7734-7387-4
978-0-7734-7387-4
Price:239.95
This book addresses the issue of the promotion of third world health. That major health problems are worsening, that the differences between first and third world responses are more largely determined by fiscal constraints than by ethnocentric differences and variations in ‘health belief models’ are taken as hypotheses to the present argument. The author examines these in well-researched detail, demonstrates how they inter-relate and then focuses on possible solutions. Because of his extensive third world experience both in medicine and education, MacDonald is able to marshal a wealth of epidemiological and statistical evidence. Ideal for students of human rights and sustainability in development, this book fills a crucial niche in the field as the new millennium begins and as the G7 nations strive to protect first world gains while ensuring that thirds world access to them remains optimally possible.

“Professor Theo MacDonald has added to his already impressive list of publications a searing analysis of the effects of global capitalism on the health of the peoples of the third world – and also of the first world. His broad conceptual approach is a major advance in our understanding of the factors which impinge on world health. The widening gap between the public service ethos and the profit motive are starkly illustrated. His examples are wide-ranging and incisive: from the effects of the export of drugs rather than food; immigration; deforestation; war; the promotion of infant foods, the promotion of cigarettes by British and American tobacco companies in China and the evolving tragedy of AIDS and HIV infection in Africa.” – David A. Player

Reviews

“There is no question that this book is set to make a distinct and lasting contribution to scholarship in the area of economic an social development within the majority world nations. MacDonald’s vast experience, both as teacher and physician, in many areas of the world, equip him admirably for the challenge he addresses in these pages. But as an added bonus, he is a consummate writer, and can hold the attention even of the lay reader and arouses a sense of urgency in the minds of specialists and non-specialists alike. Particularly brilliant is the manner in which he constructs his basic argument across a series of apparently diverse concerns – ethnic differences in health beliefs, local resource management, political ideologies, etc. – unifying their disparateness under the umbrella of development in first world market forces. I have rarely read such an incisive and carefully documented critique.” – John Evans

Table of Contents

Table of Contents (main chapter headings):
Foreword; Introduction
1. Global Health Promotion as Distorted by Trading Relations
2. Negative Impacts on First World Communities of Third World Debt
3. Structural Adjustment and its Effects on Third World Health
4. The Conflict Between Global health and Global Finance: A Case Study Approach
5. Environmental Costs of the Global Market
6. Milk and Imperialism
7. The Impact of First World Wealth on Third World Health: British & American Tobacco in China
8. An African Health Promotion Remit – HIV/AIDS
9. Western Democratic Values Will Save You!
10. Peru – A Detailed Case-Study of one Third World Country
11. Cuba – Model or Maverick?
12. Pivotal Strategies for Creating a Favourable Context for Global Health Promotion
Appendices; Index