THE ETHICAL DISCOURSE OF CHINESE CHILDREN: A Narrative Approach to the Social and Moral Intricacy of Lying About Good Deeds

Author: Gao, Minghi
Year:2010
Pages:196
ISBN:0-7734-3632-4
978-0-7734-3632-9
Price:159.95
This study identify differences in youngsters’ concepts and practices of lying about good deeds are rooted in variations in the way they react to authority figures, socio-cultural rules, peers, and personal feelings.

Reviews

“This is a beautifully written, scholarly, exacting analysis. It is both bold and cautious at the same time. Gao writes with a passion and a conviction admirably grounded in careful empirical analysis.” – Prof. Robert L. Selman, Harvard Graduate School of Education

“In revealing to us the multiple-dimensions of Chinese children’s ethical discourse, Gao’s work provides empirical evidence in support of how a narrative approach could help disclose the personal inner world to which other research approaches may have little access. This is an insightful study. It is creatively conceived in theory, and the research is carefully carried out in the field.” – Prof. Eleanor Duckworth, Harvard Graduate School of Education

Table of Contents

Foreword by David Perkins
Acknowledgements
Introduction
The Phenomenon
Existing Literature
A Narrative Approach
CHAPTER 1
Conceptual Framework
Ethical Discourse
Tipton’s Typology
Chinese Socio-Moral Culture
Obedience to Authority
Conformism to Socio-Moral Rules
Considering Relationship
Expression of Feelings
CHAPTER 2
Methodology
The Pilot Study
The Main Study
Research Site
Participants
Research Instruments
Procedures
Data Coding and Analysis
Validity Issues
CHAPTER 3
Descriptive Statistics of Chinese Children’s Ethical Discourse
Story Narratives
Stories of Good Deeds
Stories of Lying about Good Deeds
Ethical Statements
Four Orientations
Integral Multiplicities
Ethical Discourse
Four Styles
Frequency Distribution of the Four Styles
Age Difference in Ethical Discourse
CHAPTER 4
Four Styles of Chinese Children’s Ethical Discourse
The Authoritative Style
Teacher as Authority
Parents as Authority
The Rule-Governed Style
Lying about Good Deeds per se as a Rule
Discovery as a Rule
Humility as a Rule
Learning from Role Models as a Rule
The Social Consequential Style
Peers’ Distrust
Peers’ Negative Evaluation
Hurting Peer Relationships
Peers’ Jealousy
Peers’ Ridicule or Mockery
The Expressive Style
Self-Satisfaction
Embarrassment
Desire of Fulfilling a Personal Right
CHAPTER 5
Discussion, Implications, and Suggestions
Discussion
Sources of Moral Knowledge: Institutional vs. Non-Institutional
Ethical Discourse: Consistency vs. Controversy
Social Interactions: Authority vs. Peers
Social Distrust: Performance vs. Self Protection
Implications
Suggestions
Appendices
Bibliography
Index