Study on the Idea of Progress in Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Critical Theory

Author: Tassone, Giuseppe
Year:2002
Pages:368
ISBN:0-7734-7281-9
978-0-7734-7281-5
Price:239.95
This book challenges the current general mood of disillusionment of belief in progress. By confronting the nihilistic – Nietzsche and Heidegger – and the utopian – Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse – critiques of progress, it pursues a revitalization of the humanist tradition.

“. . . an ambitious and challenging book on the philosophy of history that explores the theme of progress from an original perspective. His method is both historical and conceptual, combining an intellectual history of the concept of progress with the development of a number of distinctions within the field of progressive philosophies of history. His work also has a critical edge, uncovering progressive philosophies of history at the core of theoretical works that profess to renounce progress. . . . The core of the book is a fascinating interpretation of the work of Nietzsche with an original and provocative reading of Thus Spake Zarathustra. This makes an important contribution to Nietzsche studies . . . an original and thoughtful contribution to a number of issues currently in the history of philosophy and social theory.” – Howard Caygill

Table of Contents

Table of contents (main headings):
Preface; Introduction
1. The Loewith-Blumenberg Debate
2. Longing for the Eternal (Rousseau)
3. How Nietzsche the Hyperborean comes to Grips with the Brakes of History
4. Zarathustra’s Double Will
5. The Prophet of Nothing (Nihilism)
6. The Checkmate of Reason (Max Weber)
7. The Anti-Demon of Dialectic (Horkheimer, Marcuse, Habermas, Adorno)
8. The Empyrean Heights of Technology (Habermas, Simpson, Marcuse)
Conclusion; Bibliography; Index