Shifting Points of View in Virginia Woolf’s Novel - Mrs. Dalloway

Author: Lambert, DC
Year:2011
Pages:124
ISBN:0-7734-1560-2
978-0-7734-1560-7
Price:139.95
Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway should be read as a companion to the novel, as it helps clarify the shifting and often confusing points of view.

Reviews

‘…fresh in-depth close readings of the novel’s opening and closing scenes bind together and hand the reader Woolf’s design for the novel, bringing to the forefront how unique, fluid, and intricate is the structure of Mrs. Dalloway.”-Prof. Diana Royer, Miami University

“…this strikes me as truly excellent work, both in terms of its critical acumen, its deft parsing of Woolf’s technique, and, even more impressive, its sheer readability.” -Prof. Robert Cohen, Middlebury College

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION
Point of View: The Remarkable Design
Organization of the book

PARTI: ROOMS
The Overarching Event:
Mrs. Dalloway as the foundation for building POV connections
Point of view and theme
Point of view as a crystal:
clear structure down to the smallest connection
Point of view building to overall vision
Mrs. Dalloway as the hidden spring
The importance of Mrs. Dalloway's walk
The motor car & the aeroplane

PART II: CORRIDORS
Point of View connections: categories
Alignment of structure and form
Comparison to "Mrs. Dalloway on Bond Street"
Woolfs use of "thought"
"Thought" as a point of view connector
"Thought" in other modernist writings
"Thought" in peri-modernist writings
Quotations marks and "thought"
Artistic purpose of "thought"
The Point of View Uncertainty Principle

INTRODUCTION
Point of View: The Remarkable Design
Organization of the book

PARTI: ROOMS
The Overarching Event:
Mrs. Dalloway as the foundation for building POV connections
Point of view and theme
Point of view as a crystal:
clear structure down to the smallest connection
Point of view building to overall vision
Mrs. Dalloway as the hidden spring
The importance of Mrs. Dalloway's walk
The motor car & the aeroplane

PART II: CORRIDORS
Point of View connections: categories
Alignment of structure and form
Comparison to "Mrs. Dalloway on Bond Street"
Woolfs use of "thought"
"Thought" as a point of view connector
"Thought" in other modernist writings
"Thought" in peri-modernist writings
Quotations marks and "thought"
Artistic purpose of "thought"
The Point of View Uncertainty Principle