Shakespeare and the Christian Tradition

Author: Batson, E.
Year:1994
Pages:200
ISBN:0-7734-9425-1
978-0-7734-9425-1
Price:159.95
Eight essays by prominent Shakespeare scholars explore ways in which the Christian tradition intersects Shakespearean drama. Recognizing that post-modern methods of criticism pose new questions, the first essayist raises some of these knotty questions, urges that such questions not be ignored, and challenges scholars to explore thoughtfully their implications in the studying and teaching of Shakespeare. Subsequent contributors offer a wide range of responses. Some examine particular post-modern methods, scrutinize ways in which they may enlarge understanding, or in other instances, dim illumination of dramas, while others insist that a sense of history is essential in a scholarly examination of Shakespearean drama. Some clearly demonstrate how the Christian tradition may be studied and taught in the classroom.

Reviews

"...this volume...is as much concerned with the problems of teaching Shakespeare today from a Christian perspective as with strictly historical issues of interpretation. . . . five essays consist of readings of individual plays, primarily Henry VIII, The Merchant of Venice and the late romances. They include typically detailed and informative pieces by Roy Battenhouse and Peggy Muñoz Simonds..." --Modern Language Review

". . . rewarding reading, offering stimulating insights to both Christian readers as well as to those who call their approaches to the plays by other names." - Christian Scholar's Review