Rightward drift of Mexico’s Former Revolutionaries. The Case of Antonio Diaz Soto y Gama

Author: Lucas, Jeffrey Kent
Year:2010
Pages:296
ISBN:0-7734-3665-0
978-0-7734-3665-7
Price:199.95
Unlike other historical works, which have suggested that the national abandonment of revolutionary reform was due largely to corruption, this work reveals that often corruption had little to do with it; rather, old cultural beliefs worked their way to the surface within individuals.

Table of Contents

Preface
Foreword
Introduction
Part One: ON THE LEFT
Chapter 1: Childhood, Adolescence, and Liberalism, 1880-1903
The Roots of Opposition
Education and Early Antagonism
Young Activism
Militant Liberalism
Staunch Anti-Porfirismo
The Seeds of Discontent
Chapter 2: Toward Agrarismo, 1903-1914
Brief Exile
The Return Home
Renewed Activism
Disillusionment with Madero, Early Agrarismo, and Anarchism
Anarcho-syndicalism
Transition to Zapatismo
Chapter3: With Zapata in 1914
Early Months in Morelos and the Carrancista Mission
The “Flag” Speech
Division in the Revolutionary Convention
Chapter 4: The Long, Difficult Years: 1915-1920
The Early Convention Government
The Convention and Land Reform
Otilio Montaño’s Trial
Soto y Gama’s Religious Conversion and Zapata’s Demise
Diplomatic Initiatives
Chapter 5: Life after Zapata, 1920-1928
Alliance with Obregón
The Land Debate
Land Legislation and Politics in General
Sudden About-Face
Obregón and Calles
The Cristiada and Obregón’s Death
Chapter 6: Soto y Gama Goes to the Opposition, 1928-1940
Uninhibited Vituperation
The Escobar Rebellion and Party Politics
Growing Conservatism
Anti-Cardenismo
The Genius of Cárdenas
The 1940 Presidential Campaign
Chapter 7: From World War II to Tlatelolco Sinarquismo
Anticommunism vs. the Allied War Effort
The 1946 Presidential Campaign
Political Turmoil at the National University
The Cold War Years
The Eve of Tlatelolco
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index