Rethinking 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 through Archaeological and Moral-Rhetorical Analysis

Author: Blattenberger, David
Year:1997
Pages:104
ISBN:0-7734-8562-7
978-0-7734-8562-4
Price:119.95
". . . a genuine contribution to research. The cultural practice which Paul recommends here has bedeviled interpreters for years, and thus further investigation is warranted, especially since we now have the capability to search Greek literature in a comprehensive way through computer analysis. Blattenberger argues that the custom in view is not veiling nor does Paul demand the wearing of a shawl when women pray or prophesy. The cultural practice in view relates, says Blattenberger, to the way a woman wears her hair . . . . Blattenberger has made a good case for his proposal, and his evidence must be seriously considered by scholars in identifying the practice commanded in 1 Cor. 11:2-16." - Thomas R. Schreiner

". . . provides a discussion of important issues that many will find significant for their own work in this area." - E. Earle Ellis

Reviews

". . . a rare combination of thoroughness, reverence for the Scriptures, and creative scholarship. . . . also masterfully uses ancient literary texts to determine the normal contemporary usage of key phrases in the text. But it is his analysis of applicable archaeological artifacts that brings Blattenberger's work to life. Though highly relevant, abundant, and accessible, amazingly, the latter have been ignored by even the best Biblical scholars commenting on these verses. In a work that will become known as 'formidable,' if not 'definitive,' on the meaning of 'headcovering' in I Corinthians 11:2-16, David Blattenberger demonstrates Paul's passion to encourage the Church to preserve and model appropriate, God-ordained distinctions between the sexes, including through the maintenance of personal appearance. . . . But whether you agree with all of his conclusions or not, your understanding of this important section of Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians will certainly be substantially expanded." - David Ayers

"Mr. Blattenberger's important historical and exegetical investigation into 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 displays careful research, sound judgment, and good grasp of the customs of the times from a variety of historical sources. Mr. Blattenberger has provided a persuasive thesis which should be carefully considered by all who interpret 1 Corinthians as well as by all who address the intersection of Paul's ethical teachings with his contemporary culture. A fine work worthy of wide reading." - S. M. Baugh

". . . provocative and highly competent. . . makes extensive use of archaeological and linguistic data to provide a new explanation for a key passage that has puzzled interpreters for centuries. I highly recommend it." - Wayne Grudem

". . . he has wedded together a knowledge of the language, a study of rhetorical structure, and an archaeological investigation of the practice of head coverings in the first-century world. He has developed his opinions and insights painstakingly with a c